11

I want to find the last value of y over an ordered partition using a query like this:

SELECT
  x,
  LAST_VALUE(y) OVER (PARTITION BY x ORDER BY y ASC)
FROM table

But LAST_VALUE returns lots of values that aren't the last value (in this case, the largest value) of y for a given partition. Why?

(In this case, MAX can be used instead of LAST_VALUE to find the largest value, but why doesn't LAST_VALUE return the max value too?)

3 Answers 3

45

TLDR: The query you want is:

SELECT
  x,
  LAST_VALUE(y) OVER (PARTITION BY x ORDER BY y ASC
    ROWS BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND UNBOUNDED FOLLOWING)
FROM table

Possibly followed by GROUP BY to collapse duplicate output rows from the analytic function.

And of course, it's simpler to just use MAX over an unordered partition if that's all you need:

SELECT
  x,
  MAX(y) OVER (PARTITION BY x)
FROM table

Before answering this question, here's a little background on analytic functions (a.k.a. window functions). All of the below is standard SQL and not specific to BigQuery.

First, analytic functions are not aggregation functions. Whereas aggregation functions collapse multiple input rows into a single output row, analytic functions compute exactly one output row for every input row. So you need to make sure you're thinking about what the output is for every input row.

Second, analytic functions operate over a "window" of rows that is a subset of the "partition" to which the row belongs. The partition for an input row is determined by the PARTITION BY clause, or you can omit it if you want the partition to be the entire set of input rows. The window is given by the ROWS clause, but if you don't specify it (and users usually don't), it defaults to either the entire partition (when no ordering is applied) or the set of rows in the partition from the first row to the current row (when an ORDER BY is present). Note that the window can differ for each input row in a partition!

Now, back to LAST_VALUE. Although the default window described above is reasonable in many cases (e.g., computing cumulative sums), it works spectacularly poorly with LAST_VALUE. The LAST_VALUE function returns the value of the last row in the window, and by default the last row in the window is the current row.

So to fix the problem, you need to explicitly specify that the window for LAST_VALUE is the entire partition, not just the rows up to the current row. You can do so as follows:

SELECT x, LAST_VALUE(y) OVER (PARTITION BY x ORDER BY y ASC
  ROWS BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND UNBOUNDED FOLLOWING)
FROM table

To test this out, here's an example:

SELECT
  x,
  FIRST_VALUE(x) OVER (ORDER BY x ASC) first_asc,
  FIRST_VALUE(x) OVER (ORDER BY x DESC) first_desc,
  LAST_VALUE(x) OVER (ORDER BY x ASC) last_asc,
  LAST_VALUE(x) OVER (ORDER BY x DESC) last_desc,
FROM
  (SELECT 4 as x),
  (SELECT 2 as x),
  (SELECT 1 as x),
  (SELECT 3 as x)

x,first_asc,first_desc,last_asc,last_desc
1,1,4,1,1
2,1,4,2,2
3,1,4,3,3
4,1,4,4,4

Note that LAST_VALUE returns 1, 2, 3, 4 instead of just 4 because the window changes for each input row.

Now let's specify a window that is the entire partition:

SELECT
  x,
  FIRST_VALUE(x) OVER (ORDER BY x ASC
    ROWS BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND UNBOUNDED FOLLOWING) first_asc,
  FIRST_VALUE(x) OVER (ORDER BY x DESC
    ROWS BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND UNBOUNDED FOLLOWING) first_desc,
  LAST_VALUE(x) OVER (ORDER BY x ASC
    ROWS BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND UNBOUNDED FOLLOWING) last_asc,
  LAST_VALUE(x) OVER (ORDER BY x DESC
    ROWS BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND UNBOUNDED FOLLOWING) last_desc,
FROM
  (SELECT 4 as x),
  (SELECT 2 as x),
  (SELECT 1 as x),
  (SELECT 3 as x)

x,first_asc,first_desc,last_asc,last_desc
1,1,4,4,1
2,1,4,4,1
3,1,4,4,1
4,1,4,4,1

Now we get 4 for LAST_VALUE as expected.

3
  • Thank you for the explanation. This had me stumped for ages. I hit on the FIRST_VALUE by DESC workaround but couldn't understand why LAST_VALUE wasn't working.
    – snth
    Mar 1, 2019 at 10:55
  • Glad it was helpful! :-) Mar 1, 2019 at 18:43
  • Great. your answer was so complete. thank you very much.
    – milad
    Nov 12, 2019 at 16:56
2

Even that question title uses LAST_VALUE - the question itself asks for Largest Value!
I would just go with below:

SELECT x, MAX(y) OVER (PARTITION BY x) FROM table  

And if no other fields from table involved - i would just do simple GROUP BY:

SELECT x, MAX(y) FROM table GROUP BY x 

Of course, we shoudl remember that not always Largest value and MAX value are the same thing.

3
  • I asked and answered this question because we frequently get customer complaints where users think they've found a bug in LAST_VALUE, and I figured it'd be useful to make it available as a FAQ on SO. I've modified the question so that MAX isn't a valid answer, and I've added a note to my own answer. Thanks for the note! Jan 31, 2016 at 21:46
  • sure, that was my exactly thought. i was not sure though what exactly was the user's question as it was a little fuzzy because of wording :o) Jan 31, 2016 at 21:51
  • @MikhailBerlyant "..we should remember that not always.." - Am I to blunt when I append a link to what I think you refer to? stackoverflow.com/questions/9398457/… Jun 13, 2016 at 9:42
0

Other option you have is to change the query order by to desc

SELECT
  x,
  LAST_VALUE(y) OVER (PARTITION BY x ORDER BY y ASC)
FROM table
order by x desc

but the you will get the last value only for the first row

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