3

I have some DB information that is extracted into a temporary log. I need to write a regex to parse this so it can be fed into an analytics program. I need to group each "field" as follows:

  • YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS
  • Facility
  • Severity
  • Server
  • YYYY-MM-DD: HH:MM:SS
  • TimeZone
  • IPAddress
  • LegacyEmailAddress
  • FirstName (**may or may not contain several words surrounded by quotes)
  • LastName (**may or may not contain several words surrounded by quotes)
  • AcctNum
  • ProgramCode
  • UID
  • EmailAddress
  • EventType
  • Source
  • Category

I have the regex almost there but having issues grouping the fields. Specifically, FirstName and LastName. I would ideally like these captured into two fields (and strip out the quotes if they exist) but combining FirstName and LastName into one is fine too.

The problem with the current regex is, although it groups the FirstName and LastName into one field (not ideal but acceptable), there seems to be an extra field capturing a space.

Here is the regex I am trying to get there:

^(\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}\s+\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2})\s+(\S+)\.(\S+)\s+(\S+)\s+(\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}:\s\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2})\s+(.*?)\s+(.*?)\s+(.*?)\s+(?<!")(.*)(?!")\s+(.*)\s+(.*)\s+(.*)\s+(.*)\s+(.*)\s+(.*)\s+(.*)\s+(.*)$

Here are some sample events:

2016-01-29 18:19:54 local1.info server.domain.com 2016-01-29: 11:19:54 MST UNKNOWN UNKNOWN FOO "BAR BAZ" UNKNOWN UNKNOWN UNKNOWN EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM PROFILE_CHANGE ProfileChangeProcessor A
2016-01-29 18:20:25 local4.info server.domain.com 2016-01-29: 11:20:25 MST UNKNOWN UNKNOWN "F B" BAZ ABC12345 GP SOME_UID EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM EVENT_FROM_SOME_PROCESS UNKNOWN UNKNOWN
2016-01-29 18:23:10 local1.info server.domain.com 2016-01-29: 11:23:10 MST UNKNOWN UNKNOWN FOO BAR UNKNOWN UNKNOWN UNKNOWN EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM SOME_CHANGE ProfileChangeProcessor AP
2016-01-29 18:26:24 local1.info server.domain.com 2016-01-29: 11:26:24 MST UNKNOWN EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM FOO "B'Baz" UNKNOWN UNKNOWN UNKNOWN  SOME_CHANGE ProfileChangeProcessor O
2016-01-29 18:26:55 local1.info server.domain.com 2016-01-29: 11:26:55 MST UNKNOWN EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM "FOO OR BAR" BAZ SXR12646 GP UNKNOWN  SOME_CHANGE ProfileChangeProcessor M

Here is the output when I run it through Perl inline expression:

$ cat foo.txt | perl -ne '/^(\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}\s+\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2})\s+(\S+)\.(\S+)\s+(\S+)\s+(\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}:\s\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2})\s+(.*?)\s+(.*?)\s+(.*?)\s+(?<!")(.*)(?!")\s+(.*)\s+(.*)\s+(.*)\s+(.*)\s+(.*)\s+(.*)\s+(.*)\s+(.*)$/ && print "$1|$2|$3|$4|$5|$6|$7|$8|$9|$10|$11|$12|$13|$14|$15|$16|\n"' 

2016-01-29 18:19:54|local1|info|server.domain.com|2016-01-29: 11:19:54|MST|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|FOO "BAR BAZ"|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM|PROFILE_CHANGE|ProfileChangeProcessor|A|
2016-01-29 18:20:25|local4|info|server.domain.com|2016-01-29: 11:20:25|MST|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|"F B" BAZ|ABC12345|GP|SOME_UID|EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM|EVENT_FROM_SOME_PROCESS|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|
2016-01-29 18:23:10|local1|info|server.domain.com|2016-01-29: 11:23:10|MST|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|FOO BAR|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM|SOME_CHANGE|ProfileChangeProcessor|AP|
2016-01-29 18:26:24|local1|info|server.domain.com|2016-01-29: 11:26:24|MST|UNKNOWN|EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM|FOO "B'Baz"|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN||SOME_CHANGE|ProfileChangeProcessor|O|
2016-01-29 18:26:55|local1|info|server.domain.com|2016-01-29: 11:26:55|MST|UNKNOWN|EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM|"FOO OR BAR" BAZ|SXR12646|GP|UNKNOWN||SOME_CHANGE|ProfileChangeProcessor|M|

The current issue when using the above regex resides with the last two records. At grouping #13, there is an empty field. I am not sure how to account for this. If I can't get the fields with data outputted, then it can't be loaded properly into the analytics engine. Overall, I am looking to see if there is a better approach to group the fields based on what I outlined and ensure there are no groupings where a space (or similar char) is present.

  • 1
    A tip: replace .* with some more restrictive patterns. – Wiktor Stribiżew Jan 30 '16 at 8:33
  • Thank you for responding - Yes, I guess that was what I was looking for. I realize there is a lot of "greedy" matching going on and this was where I was hoping to get some help. I suppose something like .*? is what you were thinking... – rcdsox Jan 30 '16 at 19:12
  • Dot matching is not what I meant. See the answer below. – Wiktor Stribiżew Jan 30 '16 at 20:01
0

Here's what I'd do:

^\s*
# date
(?<date>\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}\s+\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2})
# facility.severity
\s(?<facility>\S+)\.(?<severity>\S+)
# server
\s(?<server>\S*)
# date
\s(?<otherDate>\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}:\s\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2})
# time zone
\s(?<timeZone>\S*)
# ip address
\s(?<ip>\S*)
# legacy email address
\s(?<legacyEmailAddress>\S*)
# first name
\s(?|"(?<firstName>[^"\n]+)"|(?<firstName>\S*))
# last name
\s(?|"(?<lastName>[^"\n]+)"|(?<lastName>\S*))
# account number
\s(?<account>\S*)
# program code
\s(?<programCode>\S*)
# uid
\s(?<uid>\S*)
# email address
\s(?<emailAddress>\S*)
# event type
\s(?<eventType>\S*)
# source
\s(?<source>\S*)
# category
\s(?<category>\S*)
\s*$

Demo with your sample data

  • First, when you have such a pattern, you have to use the x modifier so you can put whitespace into your expression
  • Then, what does $13 mean anyway? Name your capture groups, it's much better that way.
  • Since you can have empty fields, I assumed there's exactly one whitespace separator between fields. You can't really go around that
  • Adding more specific rules than \S* wouldn't hurt, but this is up to you
  • As for the names, the pattern is: (?|"(?<name>[^"\n]+)"|(?<name>\S*))
    • (?|...) is a branch reset group. It lets you reuse the same capture group numbers or names in each of its alternatives
    • "(?<name>[^"\n]+)" captures a quoted name
    • (?<name>\S*) captures an unquoted name... only one of them can match and they'll go into the same capture group.
  • Thanks for the great feedback! This works in that the quotes are removed which is awesome. I am still in the same place with regards to one of the capture groups still containing empty data (i.e. it contains a space like in the OP for the last two records). I want to make sure I understand your feedback that there is nothing I can do about that? I am confused because it is being captured into a capture group so I would think I can ensure zero whitespace with something like: (\S*) - The challenge is the engine will not parse if any captured field contains only whitespace – rcdsox Jan 30 '16 at 19:50
  • Hmm this should work according to the regex101 demo (take a look at the Match Information frame on the right, specifically matches 4 and 5 - emailAddress is empty). Maybe you should elaborate on that in your question if something's still not working as expected. – Lucas Trzesniewski Jan 30 '16 at 20:38
  • Sorry for not being clear. I am trying to only capture if it is NOT a space for this field (emailAddress). The other fields compensate by adding UNKNOWN. However, this one field looks to be an oversight. I am simply trying to compensate for it. The pattern grouping should only return non-whitespace so getting turned around as to why it is capturing a space... In code, I could simply replace this with something like UNKNOWN. However, not sure what option I have in a matching regex (without using search/replace). – rcdsox Jan 30 '16 at 21:16
  • Well... I'm afraid you don't have much choice when dealing with plain regexes... You can't substitute captured text with something not from the input string, and I'm not sure what else I can advise you without knowing the specifics. If you're using Perl you could perhaps hack something by inserting executable code into the pattern with the (?{...}) syntax, but you won't be able to modify $14 that way as it's read-only, it all depends on the rest of your code. – Lucas Trzesniewski Jan 30 '16 at 23:48
  • After some discussion, looks like it is not an issue. One final question for you: Any way to support the regex portion for the first/last name without using branch resets (engine runs on 5.8 as opposed to 5.10+ where it is supported)? – rcdsox Jan 31 '16 at 22:38
0

That can be done much simpler.

use strict;
use warnings;

while( my $line = <DATA> ) {
    # the pattern finds any text that is either 
    # surrounded by quotation marks (") or is
    # non-whitespace. each such match is returned
    # as a field (thus the /g operator).
    my @fields = ( $line =~ /"[^\"]*"|\S+/go );
    print join('|', @fields), "\n";
}

__DATA__
2016-01-29 18:19:54 local1.info server.domain.com 2016-01-29: 11:19:54 MST UNKNOWN UNKNOWN FOO "BAR BAZ" UNKNOWN UNKNOWN UNKNOWN EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM PROFILE_CHANGE ProfileChangeProcessor A
2016-01-29 18:20:25 local4.info server.domain.com 2016-01-29: 11:20:25 MST UNKNOWN UNKNOWN "F B" BAZ ABC12345 GP SOME_UID EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM EVENT_FROM_SOME_PROCESS UNKNOWN UNKNOWN
2016-01-29 18:23:10 local1.info server.domain.com 2016-01-29: 11:23:10 MST UNKNOWN UNKNOWN FOO BAR UNKNOWN UNKNOWN UNKNOWN EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM SOME_CHANGE ProfileChangeProcessor AP
2016-01-29 18:26:24 local1.info server.domain.com 2016-01-29: 11:26:24 MST UNKNOWN EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM FOO "B'Baz" UNKNOWN UNKNOWN UNKNOWN  SOME_CHANGE ProfileChangeProcessor O
2016-01-29 18:26:55 local1.info server.domain.com 2016-01-29: 11:26:55 MST UNKNOWN EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM "FOO OR BAR" BAZ SXR12646 GP UNKNOWN  SOME_CHANGE ProfileChangeProcessor M

This yields

2016-01-29|18:19:54|local1.info|server.domain.com|2016-01-29:|11:19:54|MST|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|FOO|"BAR BAZ"|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM|PROFILE_CHANGE|ProfileChangeProcessor|A
2016-01-29|18:20:25|local4.info|server.domain.com|2016-01-29:|11:20:25|MST|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|"F B"|BAZ|ABC12345|GP|SOME_UID|EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM|EVENT_FROM_SOME_PROCESS|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN
2016-01-29|18:23:10|local1.info|server.domain.com|2016-01-29:|11:23:10|MST|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|FOO|BAR|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM|SOME_CHANGE|ProfileChangeProcessor|AP
2016-01-29|18:26:24|local1.info|server.domain.com|2016-01-29:|11:26:24|MST|UNKNOWN|EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM|FOO|"B'Baz"|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|UNKNOWN|SOME_CHANGE|ProfileChangeProcessor|O
2016-01-29|18:26:55|local1.info|server.domain.com|2016-01-29:|11:26:55|MST|UNKNOWN|EMAIL@EXAMPLE.COM|"FOO OR BAR"|BAZ|SXR12646|GP|UNKNOWN|SOME_CHANGE|ProfileChangeProcessor|M

You may need to strip leading and trailing double-quote and whitespace:

foreach my $field ( @fields ) {
        $field =~ s/^\s*\"//;
        $field =~ s/\"\s*$//;
}
  • 1
    This separates the date/time fields, which should not be a big deal... but it also skips over empty fields, and that's bad as it shifts the remaining data. – Lucas Trzesniewski Jan 30 '16 at 13:55
  • Oh, I missed that. I tried my @fields = ( $line =~ /"[^\"]*"|\S+|\b \b/go ); (that's two spaces between the \b's). It's not pretty but it works for the current data. It translates the empty field to ' ' (two spaces). I think it won't work if the empty field is at either end of the line. – PerlDuck Jan 30 '16 at 14:15
  • I'd rather use (?<=\s|^)(?=\s|$) instead of \b \b, you get an empty string in the empty field. Oh, and you can drop that /o also :) – Lucas Trzesniewski Jan 30 '16 at 14:37
  • @Lucas Yes, that's better. I wrote my pattern years ago, when the use of /o was recommended. Meanwhile it's obsolete, I guess. That's probably what "o" stands for. ;-) – PerlDuck Jan 30 '16 at 14:43
  • @PerlDog This works in its original form so many thanks and would have been a great approach. However, I realize I was not clear in my original post regarding that I needed the regex itself. The problem is the engine is configured with a regex, given a dataset. The regex I was building was intended to become what would be configured for the engine. The engine would then parse the raw extracted DB data. Nonetheless, wonderful feedback. – rcdsox Jan 30 '16 at 19:31

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