11

Full disclose, this is for a homework question:

It should have a private property of type [Circle]. An array of circles. The method should remove any circles that have a radius larger than the minimum requirement, and smaller than the max requirement.

It seems obvious that I should use removeAtIndex() to remove array items that don't meet a condition determined in the loop. However, many have pointed out before the perils of removing items in a loop because of what I guess is a "iterator/index mismatch".

Ultimately I ended up creating an empty array and using .append() to push the values that meet the "good" condition to a filteredCircles array, but I can't help but to feel that this this doesn't meet the criteria for the assignment.

Is there a solution that actually removes the items from the array in a loop?

  • 2
    Start with the last index and loop until you reach the first. Removing items only affects the indices of the items that follow. – vacawama Jan 30 '16 at 11:19
  • @vacawama How do I do that in Swift? the loop syntax doesn't allow for index-- like other languages, so I am not sure how to count backwards. – nipponese Jan 30 '16 at 11:22
  • @vacawama Nm... just learned about circles.enumerate().reverse(). Thank you! – nipponese Jan 30 '16 at 11:23
  • Have a look at Remove matched item from array of objects?. – Martin R Jan 30 '16 at 11:31
13

If the FOR LOOP is not mandatory (and I don't see this requirement in the quoted text) you should use the filter method.

When you invoke filter on an array you get a new array containing only the values that do respect the closure you passed to filter. The original array is not mutated.

struct Circle {
    let radius: Double
}

let circles = [Circle(radius: 1), Circle(radius: 5.1), Circle(radius: 4), Circle(radius: 10.8)]

let bigCircles = circles.filter { $0.radius > 5 }

Why this approach is better than mutating the array in a FOR LOOP

  1. Since circles is a constant, you don't have problems related to multithreading programming. If circles was mutable then other threads could change it while you are looping it with very scary side effects.
  2. It's less error prone. You are not writing what the CPU should do, instead you are describing how the results should be. So less potential misunderstandings between you and the compiler :)
  3. You are writing less code which does mean less potential mistakes.

These are some of the benefits of writing Functional Programming code.

| improve this answer | |
  • I guess I should just try it, but does .filter actually modify the array? – nipponese Jan 30 '16 at 11:32
  • 1
    no. that's why he assigned the return value to the circle variable (which would have to be declared using var) – Marcus Rossel Jan 30 '16 at 11:33
  • 1
    @nipponese: No it does't. And it's a good thing because (for several reasons) circles should be a constant. But if you want you can make circle a var and reassign the result to the same variable. – Luca Angeletti Jan 30 '16 at 11:34
1

To elaborate in @vacawama's answer:

struct Circle {
    var radius: Int
}

struct MyStruct {
    private var circles: [Circle]

    mutating func removeCirclesWithRadiusWithin(range: Range<Int>) {
        for index in (circles.startIndex..<circles.endIndex).reverse() {
            if range.contains(circles[index].radius) {
                circles.removeAtIndex(index)
            }
        }
    }
}

If you want to use Double for your Circle's radius, but want to keep the nice syntax:

struct Circle {
    var radius: Double
}

struct MyStruct {
    private var circles: [Circle]

    mutating func removeCirclesWithRadiusWithin<I: IntervalType where I.Bound == Double>(interval: I) {
        for index in (circles.startIndex..<circles.endIndex).reverse() {
            if interval.contains(circles[index].radius) {
                circles.removeAtIndex(index)
            }
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Because you are changing the contents of a stored property, within a struct. Therefore if you declared an instance of MyStruct using let, you could not use this method. – Marcus Rossel Jan 30 '16 at 11:30

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