3

I'm new to PHP and I am stuck trying to understand this basic while/for loop. There's a couple of things I just wanted to clarify. Here is the code:

while ($row = $sth->fetch (PDO::FETCH_NUM))
{
  print ("<tr>\n");
  for ($i = 0; $i < $sth->columnCount (); $i++)
   {
     print ("<td>" . htmlspecialchars ($row[$i]) . "</td>\n");
   }
   print ("</tr>\n");
}

I know the while is evaluating for true, so it's getting the result set of the query, and then printing the tags.

However I'm stuck on the

for ($i = 0; $i < $sth->columnCount (); $i++)

I know that the first expression evaluates once, the second evaluates at the beginning and only moves on if it's true, and the third increments by +1. But what exactly is this doing in literal terms and why is it "columnCount"?

1

This is a PDO database setup.

In literal terms, the $row is a row fetched from the database, from code that lives above in a statement which didn't make your cut. It then sends an iterator into every field of the row (getting its number from the columnCount function(http://php.net/manual/en/pdostatement.columncount.php), and prints out some html.

Generally, this kind of iterator is 'less-than-ideal' code for several reasons. Generally, coding practices in PHP prefer to use foreach instead of a for iterator unless one actually needs the count as we pass through, ostensibly why the fetch is done as FETCH_NUM, although it is never used.

while ($row = $sth->fetch())
{
  print ("<tr>\n");
  foreach ($row as $key=>$value)
   {
     print ("<td>" . htmlspecialchars($value) . "</td>\n");
   }
   print ("</tr>\n");
}
  • Thank you a bunch! It helped a lot to see it in literal terms. All of the answers were helpful. So essentially that for loop creates a way to navigate through the columns of the row? The for section of code loops until it reaches the end of the columns, and then the while portion proceeds to loop again? Thanks everyone for helping me wrap my head around this. – Timothy Fisher Jan 30 '16 at 20:00
1

What that line does is making it possible to iterate on each column of the specific $row. $sth->columnCount() returns the number of columns for what seems to be a table data structure.

On the other hand, the for loop will execute the print statement i times, where i will be 0 when starting and will be increasing itself to be as the number of columns returned by $sth->columnCount() minus 1.

Why minus 1?

Because usually in programming you start counting from 0 instead of 1.

So $row[0] represents the 1st column of your row, $row[1] represents the 2nd column, and so on, until you reach the last column which is $row[$sth->columnCount() - 1]

  • Thank you! All of the answers helped me understand this. – Timothy Fisher Jan 30 '16 at 20:01
0

The for loop is starting at the beginning of the dataset and evaluating until it reaches the end of the dataset.

The dataset will always start at 0, until $i is no longer less than the value of columnCount() it will continue.

$sth is some instantiated object (variable) which has a method called columnCount(). That method likely returns the total number of columns which $sth is representing.

It may also help to say that this for loop can be rewritten as a while loop:

$i = 0;
while($i < $sth->columnCount()) {
    // do something
    $i++;
}
  • Good information and different way to think of it, thank you! – Timothy Fisher Jan 30 '16 at 20:05
0

this will iterate through all fields of one row.

columnCount()returns the number of fields in your statement.

So if your statement is:

SELECT a,b,c,d FROM test;

columnCount() return 4.

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