3

I am trying to learn python and wanted to write some text to a file. I came across two kind of file objects.

fout=open("abc.txt",a)

with open("abc.txt",a) as fout:

The following code:

f= open("abc.txt", 'a')
f.write("Step 1\n")
print "Step 1"
with open("abc.txt", 'a') as fout:
   fout.write("Step 2\n")

Gave the output:

Step 2
Step 1

And the following code:

f= open("abc1.txt", 'a')
f.write("Step 1\n")
f= open("abc1.txt", 'a')
f.write("Step 2\n")

Gave the output:

Step 1
Step 2

Why is there difference in the outputs?

6

There is only one type of file object, just two different ways to create one. The main difference is that the with open("abc.txt",a) as fout: line handles closing the files for you so it's less error prone.

What's happening is the files you create using the fout=open("abc.txt",a) statement are being closed automatically when the program ends, and so the appending is only happening then.

If you the run the following code, you'll see that it produces the output in the correct order:

f = open("abc.txt", 'a')
f.write("Step 1\n")
f.close()
with open("abc.txt", 'a') as fout:
   fout.write("Step 2\n")

The reason the lines became reversed is due to the order that the files were closed. The code from your first example is similar to this:

f1 = open("abc.txt", 'a')
f1.write("Step 1\n")

# these three lines are roughly equivalent to the with statement (providing no errors happen)
f2 = open("abc.txt", 'a')
f2.write("Step 2\n")
f2.close() # "Step 2" is appended to the file here

# This happens automatically when your program exits if you don't do it yourself.
f1.close() # "Step 1" is appended to the file here
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  • Thanks. But why the difference in output then? – Sandeep Singh Jan 31 '16 at 23:45
  • I'm still working on the answer at the moment, I'm doing it in steps :) – Jezzamon Jan 31 '16 at 23:48
  • Oh! Thanks a lot! I couldn't relate how the writing into the file was related to the closing of the file. You cleared it up! Thanks! – Sandeep Singh Jan 31 '16 at 23:56
  • Just saw the second edit. Thanks for lengthy explanation! :) – Sandeep Singh Jan 31 '16 at 23:59
  • No problem. Normally you wouldn't have two file pointers to the same file open at the same time, because it creates unusual things like this – Jezzamon Jan 31 '16 at 23:59

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