25

I'd like to try writing an atoi implementation using SIMD instructions, to be included in RapidJSON (a C++ JSON reader/writer library). It currently has some SSE2 and SSE4.2 optimizations in other places.

If it's a speed gain, multiple atoi results can be done in parallel. The strings are originally coming from a buffer of JSON data, so a multi-atoi function will have to do any required swizzling.

The algorithm I came up with is the following:

  1. I can initialize a vector of length N in the following fashion: [10^N..10^1]
  2. I convert each character in the buffer to an integer and place them in another vector.
  3. I take each number in the significant digits vector and multiply it by the matching number in the numbers vector and sum the results.

I'm targeting x86 and x86-64 architectures.

I know that AVX2 supports three operand Fused Multiply-Add so I'll be able to perform Sum = Number * Significant Digit + Sum.
That's where I got so far.
Is my algorithm correct? Is there a better way?
Is there a reference implementation for atoi using any SIMD instructions set?

  • 2
    If you are trying to do this with x86 SIMD instructions, I recommend you to tag this as assembly and x86 so the people that read the corresponding tag queues see your post. – fuz Feb 1 '16 at 9:57
  • 2
    Related SSE string-parsing question with some useful techniques: stackoverflow.com/a/31683632/224132 (packed-compare -> shuffle mask lookup). That might not be needed here, since you only need the find the end of one string. – Peter Cordes Feb 1 '16 at 11:04
  • @FUZxxl Most questions I've seen tag SIMD alongsides C since that's what they are using to implement SIMD operations with. – the_drow Feb 1 '16 at 11:13
  • @the_drow: Are you planning to target C with SSE intrinsics, or write a whole function in asm (e.g. with Intel syntax (NASM/YASM) or AT&T syntax (gcc-style))? Those are your two good options. Either way, see the links at stackoverflow.com/tags/x86/info. Inline ASM is the 3rd option, but it's a bad choice. Also, I noticed that stgatilov's SSE IPv4 address parser I linked does have some ideas for 1-3 digit strings. – Peter Cordes Feb 1 '16 at 13:39
  • 1
    BTW, a quick google for SIMD atoi turned up a few hits: software.intel.com/en-us/forums/intel-c-compiler/topic/296952 talks about the same stuff that the answers and comments here have said, mostly. (not as much detail as zx485's answer though). There's also this mersenneforum.org/showthread.php?t=11590, where a couple people were throwing around some actual code. They're talking about using double to handle the math for the full range of 32bit integers. One early post has an apparently full atoi that he says takes 70 cycles on core2. – Peter Cordes Feb 2 '16 at 13:11
18

The algorithm and its implementation is finished now. It's complete and (moderately) tested (Updated for less constant memory usage and tolerating plus-char).

The properties of this code are as follows:

  • Works for int and uint, from MIN_INT=-2147483648 to MAX_INT=2147483647 and from MIN_UINT=0 to MAX_UINT=4294967295
  • A leading '-' char indicates a negative number (as sensible), a leading '+' char is ignored
  • Leading zeros (with or without sign char) are ignored
  • Overflow is ignored - bigger numbers just wraparound
  • Zero length strings result in value 0 = -0
  • Invalid characters are recognized and the conversion ends at the first invalid char
  • At least 16 bytes after the last leading zero must be accessible and possible security implications of reading after EOS are left to the caller
  • Only SSE4.2 is needed

About this implementation:

  • This code sample can be run with GNU Assembler(as) using .intel_syntax noprefix at the beginning
  • Data footprint for constants is 64 bytes (4*128 bit XMM) equalling one cache line.
  • Code footprint is 46 instructions with 51 micro-Ops and 64 cycles latency
  • One loop for removal of leading zeros, otherwise no jumps except for error handling, so...
  • Time complexity is O(1)

The approach of the algorithm:

- Pointer to number string is expected in ESI
- Check if first char is '-', then indicate if negative number in EDX (**A**)
- Check for leading zeros and EOS (**B**)
- Check string for valid digits and get strlen() of valid chars (**C**)
- Reverse string so that power of 
  10^0 is always at BYTE 15
  10^1 is always at BYTE 14
  10^2 is always at BYTE 13
  10^3 is always at BYTE 12
  10^4 is always at BYTE 11 
  ... 
  and mask out all following chars (**D**)
- Subtract saturated '0' from each of the 16 possible chars (**1**)
- Take 16 consecutive byte-values and and split them to WORDs 
  in two XMM-registers (**2**)
  P O N M L K J I  | H G F E D C B A ->
    H   G   F   E  |   D   C   B   A (XMM0)
    P   O   N   M  |   L   K   J   I (XMM1)
- Multiply each WORD by its place-value modulo 10000 (1,10,100,1000)
  (factors smaller then MAX_WORD, 4 factors per QWORD/halfXMM)
  (**2**) so we can horizontally combine twice before another multiply.
  The PMADDWD instruction can do this and the next step:
- Horizontally add adjacent WORDs to DWORDs (**3**)
  H*1000+G*100  F*10+E*1  |  D*1000+C*100  B*10+A*1 (XMM0)
  P*1000+O*100  N*10+M*1  |  L*1000+K*100  J*10+I*1 (XMM1)
- Horizontally add adjacent DWORDs from XMM0 and XMM1 to XMM0 (**4**)
  xmmDst[31-0]   = xmm0[63-32]  + xmm0[31-0]
  xmmDst[63-32]  = xmm0[127-96] + xmm0[95-64]
  xmmDst[95-64]  = xmm1[63-32]  + xmm1[31-0]
  xmmDst[127-96] = xmm1[127-96] + xmm1[95-64]
- Values in XMM0 are multiplied with the factors (**5**)
  P*1000+O*100+N*10+M*1 (DWORD factor 1000000000000 = too big for DWORD, but possibly useful for QWORD number strings)
  L*1000+K*100+J*10+I*1 (DWORD factor 100000000)
  H*1000+G*100+F*10+E*1 (DWORD factor 10000)
  D*1000+C*100+B*10+A*1 (DWORD factor 1)
- The last step is adding these four DWORDs together with 2*PHADDD emulated by 2*(PSHUFD+PADDD)
  - xmm0[31-0]  = xmm0[63-32]  + xmm0[31-0]   (**6**)
    xmm0[63-32] = xmm0[127-96] + xmm0[95-64]
      (the upper QWORD contains the same and is ignored)
  - xmm0[31-0]  = xmm0[63-32]  + xmm0[31-0]   (**7**)
- If the number is negative (indicated in EDX by 000...0=pos or 111...1=neg), negate it(**8**)

And the sample implementation in GNU Assembler with intel syntax:

.intel_syntax noprefix
.data
  .align 64
    ddqDigitRange: .byte  '0','9',0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0
    ddqShuffleMask:.byte  15,14,13,12,11,10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0 
    ddqFactor1:    .word  1,10,100,1000, 1,10,100,1000  
    ddqFactor2:    .long  1,10000,100000000,0
.text    
_start:
   mov   esi, lpInputNumberString
   /* (**A**) indicate negative number in EDX */
   mov   eax, -1
   xor   ecx, ecx
   xor   edx, edx
   mov   bl,  byte ptr [esi]
   cmp   bl,  '-'
   cmove edx, eax
   cmp   bl,  '+'
   cmove ecx, eax
   sub   esi, edx
   sub   esi, ecx
   /* (**B**)remove leading zeros */
   xor   eax,eax               /* return value ZERO */
  remove_leading_zeros:
   inc   esi
   cmp   byte ptr [esi-1], '0'  /* skip leading zeros */
  je remove_leading_zeros
   cmp   byte ptr [esi-1], 0    /* catch empty string/number */
  je FINISH
   dec   esi
   /* check for valid digit-chars and invert from front to back */
   pxor      xmm2, xmm2         
   movdqa    xmm0, xmmword ptr [ddqDigitRange]
   movdqu    xmm1, xmmword ptr [esi]
   pcmpistri xmm0, xmm1, 0b00010100 /* (**C**) iim8=Unsigned bytes, Ranges, Negative Polarity(-), returns strlen() in ECX */
  jo FINISH             /* if first char is invalid return 0 - prevent processing empty string - 0 is still in EAX */
   mov al , '0'         /* value to subtract from chars */
   sub ecx, 16          /* len-16=negative to zero for shuffle mask */
   movd      xmm0, ecx
   pshufb    xmm0, xmm2 /* broadcast CL to all 16 BYTEs */
   paddb     xmm0, xmmword ptr [ddqShuffleMask] /* Generate permute mask for PSHUFB - all bytes < 0 have highest bit set means place gets zeroed */
   pshufb    xmm1, xmm0 /* (**D**) permute - now from highest to lowest BYTE are factors 10^0, 10^1, 10^2, ... */
   movd      xmm0, eax                         /* AL='0' from above */
   pshufb    xmm0, xmm2                        /* broadcast AL to XMM0 */
   psubusb   xmm1, xmm0                        /* (**1**) */
   movdqa    xmm0, xmm1
   punpcklbw xmm0, xmm2                        /* (**2**) */
   punpckhbw xmm1, xmm2
   pmaddwd   xmm0, xmmword ptr [ddqFactor1]    /* (**3**) */
   pmaddwd   xmm1, xmmword ptr [ddqFactor1]
   phaddd    xmm0, xmm1                        /* (**4**) */
   pmulld    xmm0, xmmword ptr [ddqFactor2]    /* (**5**) */
   pshufd    xmm1, xmm0, 0b11101110            /* (**6**) */
   paddd     xmm0, xmm1
   pshufd    xmm1, xmm0, 0b01010101            /* (**7**) */
   paddd     xmm0, xmm1
   movd      eax, xmm0
   /* negate if negative number */              
   add       eax, edx                          /* (**8**) */
   xor       eax, edx
  FINISH:
   /* EAX is return (u)int value */

The result of Intel-IACA Throughput Analysis for Haswell 32-bit:

Throughput Analysis Report
--------------------------
Block Throughput: 16.10 Cycles       Throughput Bottleneck: InterIteration

Port Binding In Cycles Per Iteration:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|  Port  |  0   -  DV  |  1   |  2   -  D   |  3   -  D   |  4   |  5   |  6   |  7   |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Cycles | 9.5    0.0  | 10.0 | 4.5    4.5  | 4.5    4.5  | 0.0  | 11.1 | 11.4 | 0.0  |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

N - port number or number of cycles resource conflict caused delay, DV - Divider pipe (on port 0)
D - Data fetch pipe (on ports 2 and 3), CP - on a critical path
F - Macro Fusion with the previous instruction occurred
* - instruction micro-ops not bound to a port
^ - Micro Fusion happened
# - ESP Tracking sync uop was issued
@ - SSE instruction followed an AVX256 instruction, dozens of cycles penalty is expected
! - instruction not supported, was not accounted in Analysis

| Num Of |                    Ports pressure in cycles                     |    |
|  Uops  |  0  - DV  |  1  |  2  -  D  |  3  -  D  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |    |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0*   |           |     |           |           |     |     |     |     |    | xor eax, eax
|   0*   |           |     |           |           |     |     |     |     |    | xor ecx, ecx
|   0*   |           |     |           |           |     |     |     |     |    | xor edx, edx
|   1    |           | 0.1 |           |           |     |     | 0.9 |     |    | dec eax
|   1    |           |     | 0.5   0.5 | 0.5   0.5 |     |     |     |     | CP | mov bl, byte ptr [esi]
|   1    |           |     |           |           |     |     | 1.0 |     | CP | cmp bl, 0x2d
|   2    | 0.1       | 0.2 |           |           |     |     | 1.8 |     | CP | cmovz edx, eax
|   1    | 0.1       | 0.5 |           |           |     |     | 0.4 |     | CP | cmp bl, 0x2b
|   2    | 0.5       | 0.2 |           |           |     |     | 1.2 |     | CP | cmovz ecx, eax
|   1    | 0.2       | 0.5 |           |           |     |     | 0.2 |     | CP | sub esi, edx
|   1    | 0.2       | 0.5 |           |           |     |     | 0.3 |     | CP | sub esi, ecx
|   0*   |           |     |           |           |     |     |     |     |    | xor eax, eax
|   1    | 0.3       | 0.1 |           |           |     |     | 0.6 |     | CP | inc esi
|   2^   | 0.3       |     | 0.5   0.5 | 0.5   0.5 |     |     | 0.6 |     |    | cmp byte ptr [esi-0x1], 0x30
|   0F   |           |     |           |           |     |     |     |     |    | jz 0xfffffffb
|   2^   | 0.6       |     | 0.5   0.5 | 0.5   0.5 |     |     | 0.4 |     |    | cmp byte ptr [esi-0x1], 0x0
|   0F   |           |     |           |           |     |     |     |     |    | jz 0x8b
|   1    | 0.1       | 0.9 |           |           |     |     |     |     | CP | dec esi
|   1    |           |     | 0.5   0.5 | 0.5   0.5 |     |     |     |     |    | movdqa xmm0, xmmword ptr [0x80492f0]
|   1    |           |     | 0.5   0.5 | 0.5   0.5 |     |     |     |     | CP | movdqu xmm1, xmmword ptr [esi]
|   0*   |           |     |           |           |     |     |     |     |    | pxor xmm2, xmm2
|   3    | 2.0       | 1.0 |           |           |     |     |     |     | CP | pcmpistri xmm0, xmm1, 0x14
|   1    |           |     |           |           |     |     | 1.0 |     |    | jo 0x6e
|   1    |           | 0.4 |           |           |     | 0.1 | 0.5 |     |    | mov al, 0x30
|   1    | 0.1       | 0.5 |           |           |     | 0.1 | 0.3 |     | CP | sub ecx, 0x10
|   1    |           |     |           |           |     | 1.0 |     |     | CP | movd xmm0, ecx
|   1    |           |     |           |           |     | 1.0 |     |     | CP | pshufb xmm0, xmm2
|   2^   |           | 1.0 | 0.5   0.5 | 0.5   0.5 |     |     |     |     | CP | paddb xmm0, xmmword ptr [0x80492c0]
|   1    |           |     |           |           |     | 1.0 |     |     | CP | pshufb xmm1, xmm0
|   1    |           |     |           |           |     | 1.0 |     |     |    | movd xmm0, eax
|   1    |           |     |           |           |     | 1.0 |     |     |    | pshufb xmm0, xmm2
|   1    |           | 1.0 |           |           |     |     |     |     | CP | psubusb xmm1, xmm0
|   0*   |           |     |           |           |     |     |     |     | CP | movdqa xmm0, xmm1
|   1    |           |     |           |           |     | 1.0 |     |     | CP | punpcklbw xmm0, xmm2
|   1    |           |     |           |           |     | 1.0 |     |     |    | punpckhbw xmm1, xmm2
|   2^   | 1.0       |     | 0.5   0.5 | 0.5   0.5 |     |     |     |     | CP | pmaddwd xmm0, xmmword ptr [0x80492d0]
|   2^   | 1.0       |     | 0.5   0.5 | 0.5   0.5 |     |     |     |     |    | pmaddwd xmm1, xmmword ptr [0x80492d0]
|   3    |           | 1.0 |           |           |     | 2.0 |     |     | CP | phaddd xmm0, xmm1
|   3^   | 2.0       |     | 0.5   0.5 | 0.5   0.5 |     |     |     |     | CP | pmulld xmm0, xmmword ptr [0x80492e0]
|   1    |           |     |           |           |     | 1.0 |     |     | CP | pshufd xmm1, xmm0, 0xee
|   1    |           | 1.0 |           |           |     |     |     |     | CP | paddd xmm0, xmm1
|   1    |           |     |           |           |     | 1.0 |     |     | CP | pshufd xmm1, xmm0, 0x55
|   1    |           | 1.0 |           |           |     |     |     |     | CP | paddd xmm0, xmm1
|   1    | 1.0       |     |           |           |     |     |     |     | CP | movd eax, xmm0
|   1    |           |     |           |           |     |     | 1.0 |     | CP | add eax, edx
|   1    |           |     |           |           |     |     | 1.0 |     | CP | xor eax, edx
Total Num Of Uops: 51

The result of Intel-IACA Latency Analysis for Haswell 32-bit:

Latency Analysis Report
---------------------------
Latency: 64 Cycles

N - port number or number of cycles resource conflict caused delay, DV - Divider pipe (on port 0)
D - Data fetch pipe (on ports 2 and 3), CP - on a critical path
F - Macro Fusion with the previous instruction occurred
* - instruction micro-ops not bound to a port
^ - Micro Fusion happened
# - ESP Tracking sync uop was issued
@ - Intel(R) AVX to Intel(R) SSE code switch, dozens of cycles penalty is expected
! - instruction not supported, was not accounted in Analysis

The Resource delay is counted since all the sources of the instructions are ready
and until the needed resource becomes available

| Inst |                 Resource Delay In Cycles                  |    |
| Num  | 0  - DV | 1  | 2  - D  | 3  - D  | 4  | 5  | 6  | 7  | FE |    |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
|  0   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    |    | xor eax, eax
|  1   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    |    | xor ecx, ecx
|  2   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    |    | xor edx, edx
|  3   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    |    | dec eax
|  4   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    | 1  | CP | mov bl, byte ptr [esi]
|  5   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | cmp bl, 0x2d
|  6   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | cmovz edx, eax
|  7   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | cmp bl, 0x2b
|  8   |         |    |         |         |    |    | 1  |    |    | CP | cmovz ecx, eax
|  9   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | sub esi, edx
| 10   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | sub esi, ecx
| 11   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    | 3  |    | xor eax, eax
| 12   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | inc esi
| 13   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    |    | cmp byte ptr [esi-0x1], 0x30
| 14   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    |    | jz 0xfffffffb
| 15   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    |    | cmp byte ptr [esi-0x1], 0x0
| 16   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    |    | jz 0x8b
| 17   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | dec esi
| 18   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    | 4  |    | movdqa xmm0, xmmword ptr [0x80492f0]
| 19   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | movdqu xmm1, xmmword ptr [esi]
| 20   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    | 5  |    | pxor xmm2, xmm2
| 21   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | pcmpistri xmm0, xmm1, 0x14
| 22   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    |    | jo 0x6e
| 23   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    | 6  |    | mov al, 0x30
| 24   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | sub ecx, 0x10
| 25   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | movd xmm0, ecx
| 26   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | pshufb xmm0, xmm2
| 27   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    | 7  | CP | paddb xmm0, xmmword ptr [0x80492c0]
| 28   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | pshufb xmm1, xmm0
| 29   |         |    |         |         |    | 1  |    |    |    |    | movd xmm0, eax
| 30   |         |    |         |         |    | 1  |    |    |    |    | pshufb xmm0, xmm2
| 31   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | psubusb xmm1, xmm0
| 32   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | movdqa xmm0, xmm1
| 33   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | punpcklbw xmm0, xmm2
| 34   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    |    | punpckhbw xmm1, xmm2
| 35   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    | 9  | CP | pmaddwd xmm0, xmmword ptr [0x80492d0]
| 36   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    | 9  |    | pmaddwd xmm1, xmmword ptr [0x80492d0]
| 37   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | phaddd xmm0, xmm1
| 38   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    | 10 | CP | pmulld xmm0, xmmword ptr [0x80492e0]
| 39   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | pshufd xmm1, xmm0, 0xee
| 40   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | paddd xmm0, xmm1
| 41   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | pshufd xmm1, xmm0, 0x55
| 42   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | paddd xmm0, xmm1
| 43   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | movd eax, xmm0
| 44   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | add eax, edx
| 45   |         |    |         |         |    |    |    |    |    | CP | xor eax, edx

Resource Conflict on Critical Paths: 
-----------------------------------------------------------------
|  Port  | 0  - DV | 1  | 2  - D  | 3  - D  | 4  | 5  | 6  | 7  |
-----------------------------------------------------------------
| Cycles | 0    0  | 0  | 0    0  | 0    0  | 0  | 0  | 1  | 0  |
-----------------------------------------------------------------

List Of Delays On Critical Paths
-------------------------------
6 --> 8 1 Cycles Delay On Port6

An alternative handling suggested in comments by Peter Cordes is replacing the last two add+xor instructions by an imul. This concentration of OpCodes is likely to be superior. Unfortunately IACA doesn't support that instruction and throws a ! - instruction not supported, was not accounted in Analysis comment. Nevertheless, although I like the reduction of OpCodes and reduction from (2uops, 2c latency) to (1 uop, 3c latency - "worse latency, but still one m-op on AMD"), I prefer to leave it to the implementer which way to choose. I haven't checked if the following code is sufficient for parsing any number. It is just mentioned for completeness and code modifications in other parts may be necessary (especially handling positive numbers).

The alternative may be replacing the last two lines with:

  ...
  /* negate if negative number */              
   imul eax, edx
  FINISH:
  /* EAX is return (u)int value */
  • 1
    @Peter Cordes: I'm not sure what you mean by that. An XMM register is 128-bit wide, a QWORD is 64-bit wide, a DWORD is 32-bit wide, a WORD is 16-bit wide and a BYTE is 8-bit wide. Therefore a 128-bit register could be considered as containing two 64-bit values(QWORDs). I chose that expression because there are four factors 1,10,100,1000 each WORD wide and applied to half an XMM register, a QWORD=4*WORD. I did that for clarity, but may have failed in that regard. – zx485 Feb 1 '16 at 14:25
  • 1
    Anyway, now that you've got what's probably the most efficient way to do the actual atoi part, there's the tricky part of masking out bytes beyond the end of the string. pcmpeqb against a vector of all-zero, maybe? Then do pmovmskb / bit-scan to find the position? Or if you're parsing it from a bigger buffer, you already have the length of the string. Filling the rest of the string/vector with ASCII '0' one way or another, or integer zero after the subtract, would work. Maybe use the length as an index into a table of masks? – Peter Cordes Feb 1 '16 at 14:51
  • 1
    I believe you (and know) that phaddd is slower. I was just trying to encourage you to provide some code, because I have checked out many alternatives... ;-) btw SDE is nice, but IIRC you can't debug the code run with it :-( – zx485 Feb 1 '16 at 15:04
  • 1
    ah ok. Well you just use pshufd xmm1, xmm0, 0x3 <<2 + 0x2 (or movhlps) to get the high two dwords into the low position of another vector, then paddd xmm0, xmm1. You're emulating psrldq xmm0, 8 and then psrldq xmm0, 4, but with non-destructive operations. If you had AVX, you'd just use vpsrldq xmm1, xmm0, 8. Since you're just taking the low dword result anyway, it doesn't matter if you end up with garbage or zeros in other elements, as long as you avoid false dependencies (so movhlps isn't good in that respect, because it merges into the dest reg). – Peter Cordes Feb 1 '16 at 15:17
  • 1
    I just checked on what pcmpistrm can do: It can check for characters that are in a range, so you can use it to mask the digit-string out of the original source, without tokenizing or copying it out of the source buffer first. It's only 3 uops for p0, but it's high latency: 9c lat. (Intel Skylake). It is the fastest of the four pcmp string insns, on Intel and AMD, though. Although to be robust, atoi needs to handle strings longer than 16B. Leading zeros are allowed, and so is just plain overflow from huge numbers. – Peter Cordes Feb 1 '16 at 15:25
5

I would approach this problem like this:

  1. Initialize the accumulator to 0.
  2. Load the next four characters of the string into an SSE register.
  3. Subtract the value '0' from each character.
  4. Find the first value in the vector whose unsigned value is greater than 9.
  5. If a value was found, shift the components of the vector to the right so that the value found in the previous step was just shifted out.
  6. Load a vector containing powers of ten (1000, 100, 10, 1) and multiply with that.
  7. Compute the sum of all entries in the vector.
  8. Multiply the accumulator with an appropriate value (depending on the number of shifts in step 5) and add the vector. You can use an FMA instruction for that, but I don't know if such an instruction exists for integers.
  9. If no value greater than 9 was found in step four, goto step 2.
  10. Return the accumulator.

You could simplify the algorithm by zeroing out all entries beginning with the wrong one in step 5 instead of shifting and then dividing by an appropriate power of ten in the end.

Please keep in mind that this algorithm reads past the end of the string and is thus not a drop-in replacement for atoi.

  • 1
    @the_drow: you can't easily - you're trying to use SIMD in an awkward way, for something that it's not really suited to. SIMD is designed for "vertical" operations rather than "horizontal" operations like this. You will need to ensure that your input string is padded out to a multiple of 16 bytes. You could copy it to a temporary padded buffer before processing though, if you really want a robust implementation (i.e. if this is not just a learning exercise). – Paul R Feb 1 '16 at 10:55
  • 1
    The only SSE or AVX integer FMAs are not useful for this: PMADDWD: vertical multiply of packed words then horizontally add pairs of adjacent dwords. And PMADDUBSW: vertical multiply of unsigned bytes in the first operand with the corresponding signed byte of the 2nd operand, then horizontally add adjacent pairs of signed words (with signed saturation). One of the AVX512 extensions has some integer FMA stuff, IIRC. – Peter Cordes Feb 1 '16 at 10:58
  • 1
    @the_drow: See this Q&A: stackoverflow.com/questions/34306933/…. Your other option is to make sure your string buffer is aligned by 16, so you can't cross a page boundary by reading a full 16B. (Or even a cache-line boundary). – Peter Cordes Feb 1 '16 at 11:01
  • 1
    @PaulR: If you write your local buffer one byte at a time while looking for the end of the string, you have to eat the latency of a store-forwarding stall. Not a throughput problem directly, though. Anyway, I think if there was a perf benefit to be had in the general case, atoi would already be implemented this way. Good point about a learning exercise, though. It's certainly a problem with easy-to-verify results, and an existing known-good implementation in libc. – Peter Cordes Feb 1 '16 at 11:08
  • 2
    @FUZxxl: It does say "I know that AXV2 supports ...". But still, I'd give you another +1 if I could for subtly criticizing the OP's lack of specificity in the question, since that doesn't explicitly say what he's targeting. It does matter which level of SSE instructions he is willing to assume, and potentially which microarch he's optimizing for. Also whether he can usefully atoi multiple strings in parallel. (Although in practice, the shuffling overhead to get one character at a time from 4 or 16 strings into a vector would be killer.) – Peter Cordes Feb 1 '16 at 13:05

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.