5

I have a dataframe of time series data with daily observations of temperatures. I need to create a dummy variable that counts each day that has temperature above a threshold of 5C. This would be easy in itself, but an additional condition exists: counting starts only after ten consecutive days above the threshold occurs. Here's an example dataframe:

df <- data.frame(date = seq(365), 
         temp = -30 + 0.65*seq(365) - 0.0018*seq(365)^2 + rnorm(365))

I think I got it done, but with too many loops for my liking. This is what I did:

df$dummyUnconditional <- 0
df$dummyHead <- 0
df$dummyTail <- 0

for(i in 1:nrow(df)){
    if(df$temp[i] > 5){
        df$dummyUnconditional[i] <- 1
    }
}

for(i in 1:(nrow(df)-9)){
    if(sum(df$dummyUnconditional[i:(i+9)]) == 10){
        df$dummyHead[i] <- 1
    }
}

for(i in 9:nrow(df)){
    if(sum(df$dummyUnconditional[(i-9):i]) == 10){
        df$dummyTail[i] <- 1
    }
}

df$dummyConditional <- ifelse(df$dummyHead == 1 | df$dummyTail == 1, 1, 0)

Could anyone suggest simpler ways for doing this?

3 Answers 3

5

Here's a base R option using rle:

df$dummy <- with(rle(df$temp > 5), rep(as.integer(values & lengths >= 10), lengths))

Some explanation: The task is a classic use case for the run length encoding (rle) function, imo. We first check if the value of temp is greater than 5 (creating a logical vector) and apply rle on that vector resulting in:

> rle(df$temp > 5)
#Run Length Encoding
#  lengths: int [1:7] 66 1 1 225 2 1 69
#  values : logi [1:7] FALSE TRUE FALSE TRUE FALSE TRUE ...

Now we want to find those cases where the values is TRUE (i.e. temp is greater than 5) and where at the same time the lengths is greater than 10 (i.e. at least ten consecutive tempvalues are greater than 5). We do this by running:

values & lengths >= 10

And finally, since we want to return a vector of the same lengths as nrow(df), we use rep(..., lengths) and as.integer in order to return 1/0 instead of TRUE/FALSE.

7
  • 1
    The other two suggestions work too, but this was the simplest and I'm somehow inclined to use R-base solution if such exists. Thanks!
    – Antti
    Commented Feb 1, 2016 at 14:57
  • You may want to closely examine this solution. I got dummy values = 1 on days 67-75, despite the fact that these days are not a part of a consecutive 10 day run of > 5 degree temps
    – JHowIX
    Commented Feb 1, 2016 at 15:25
  • @JHowIX, can you provide an example of that? Note that the sample data uses rnorm without setting a seed so solutions are not necessary the same (since sample data may differ)
    – talat
    Commented Feb 1, 2016 at 15:30
  • @docendodiscimus - true, I am not sure how would like me to communicate sample data. However, run your solution and my solution on the same dataframe, they produce different results, which means either yours or mine is incorrect. If its mine I would like to know so I can correct it.
    – JHowIX
    Commented Feb 1, 2016 at 15:45
  • 2
    rle <-- the closest R has to an all-purpose hammer. :-) Commented Feb 1, 2016 at 16:37
5

I think you could use a combination of a simple ifelse and the roll apply function in the zoo package to achieve what you are looking for. The final step just involves padding the result to account for the first N-1 days where there isnt enough information to fill the window.

library(zoo)

df <- data.frame(date = seq(365), 
                 temp = -30 + 0.65*seq(365) - 0.0018*seq(365)^2 + rnorm(365))

df$above5 <- ifelse(df$temp > 5, 1, 0)
temp <- rollapply(df$above5, 10, sum)
df$conseq <- c(rep(0, 9),temp)
2
  • 1
    replace function(x) { sum(x) } with a simple sum ?
    – Ben Bolker
    Commented Feb 1, 2016 at 14:31
  • 1
    Suggest writing it like this: df2 <- transform(transform(df, uncond = temp > 5), head = rollsum(uncond, 10, align = "left", fill = 0) == 10, tail = rollsum(uncond, 10, align = "right", fill = 0) == 10) + 0 Commented Feb 1, 2016 at 14:32
2

I would do this:

set.seed(42)
df <- data.frame(date = seq(365), 
                 temp = -30 + 0.65*seq(365) - 0.0018*seq(365)^2 + rnorm(365))
thr <- 5
df$dum <- 0

#find first 10 consecutive values above threshold
test1 <- filter(df$temp > thr, rep(1,10), sides = 1) == 10L
test1[1:9] <- FALSE
n <- which(cumsum(test1) == 1L)

#count days above threshold after that
df$dum[(n+1):nrow(df)] <- cumsum(df$temp[(n+1):nrow(df)] > thr)

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