180

Is there a simple way to time the execution of a command in PowerShell, like the 'time' command in Linux?
I came up with this:

$s=Get-Date; .\do_something.ps1 ; $e=Get-Date; ($e - $s).TotalSeconds

But I would like something simpler like

time .\do_something.ps1
288

Yup.

Measure-Command { .\do_something.ps1 }

Note that one minor downside of Measure-Command is that you see no stdout output. If you want to see the output, then you can use the .NET Stopwatch object e.g.:

$sw = [Diagnostics.Stopwatch]::StartNew()
.\do_something.ps1
$sw.Stop()
$sw.Elapsed
  • 99
    You can also see output like this, Measure-Command {ps | Out-Default}. Or anything else that writes directly to the host, which may or may not be useful. – JasonMArcher Aug 21 '10 at 5:23
  • 17
    I took this solution and wrote a function that may be useful to someone else. gist.github.com/2206444 -- Example: time { ping -n 1 google.com } -Samples 10 will run the command 10 times and return the average, minimum and maximum time taken. You can add -Silent to swallow STDOUT. – joshuapoehls Mar 26 '12 at 18:11
  • 10
    My preference would be to assign the result of Measure-Command to a variable, like $t = Measure-Command {<<your command or code block>>} . Try it out and then type $t at the prompt to see your results and all the properties you have access to, like $t.Milliseconds, $t.TotalSeconds, etc. Then we can write to whatever output we want, for instance, Write-Host That command took $t.TotalSeconds to complete. – Baodad Jan 21 '14 at 19:49
  • what's faster to use? net.stopwatch, or measure-command, or just comparing two get-date vars... (I mean what's more efficient to keep permanently in a script?) – Hicsy Sep 20 '17 at 4:00
  • Perhaps include the gist of JasonMArcher's comment (so it is clear it can be used in a more fine-grained way than a whole PowerShell script)? – Peter Mortensen Nov 28 '18 at 17:27
166

You can also get the last command from history and subtract its EndExecutionTime from its StartExecutionTime.

.\do_something.ps1  
$command = Get-History -Count 1  
$command.EndExecutionTime - $command.StartExecutionTime
  • 21
    Try this sometime: Get-History | Group {$_.StartExecutionTime.Hour} | sort Count -desc to see your PowerShell usage pattern by hour of day. :-) – Keith Hill Aug 18 '10 at 21:41
  • 14
    +1 for being able to use this to find out how long something took even when you didn't expect it to take a long time when you started so you didn't think to wrap it in Measure-Command. – Chris Magnuson Feb 1 '15 at 17:34
  • 3
    powershell is awesome sometimes. – ConstantineK Aug 25 '15 at 23:42
  • I wish I can give you more than just +1 :) – Dawid Ferenczy Rogožan Nov 29 '18 at 21:37
  • Yes, this is great! I made a one-liner using: $command = Get-History -Count 1 ; "{0}" -f ($command.EndExecutionTime - $command.StartExecutionTime) – Phil Mar 27 at 16:56
91

Use Measure-Command

Example

Measure-Command { <your command here> | Out-Host }

The pipe to Out-Host allows you to see the output of the command, which is otherwise consumed by Measure-Command.

  • 1
    note that ps can be any user defined function. – TankorSmash Jan 2 '17 at 8:07
  • I think you mean Measure-Command {<your command } | Out-Host - the Out-Host is outside the script block – Peter McEvoy Jun 13 '18 at 8:24
  • @Peter - it needs to be inside the block, otherwise Measure-Command consumes the output before it goes to the console. – Droj Jun 13 '18 at 14:41
  • 1
    Gotcha... in that case, you might not even need the pipe. It should just print the results, unless you have it wrapped in some other block.... – Droj Jun 14 '18 at 19:35
  • 1
    Is Out-Default maybe better than Out-Host because compatible with scripting? jsnover.com/blog/2013/12/07/write-host-considered-harmful – MarcH Jan 4 at 21:49
17

Simples

function time($block) {
    $sw = [Diagnostics.Stopwatch]::StartNew()
    &$block
    $sw.Stop()
    $sw.Elapsed
}

then can use as

time { .\some_command }

You may want to tweak the output

  • 3
    What's about Measure-Command ? – Kiquenet Oct 9 '13 at 9:41
  • Measure-Command hides command output, so this solution is sometimes better. – codekaizen Oct 20 '18 at 4:39
  • This is a fantastic solution, which respects the command's output. You can also invoke it without curly braces for simple commands, for example: "time ls", exactly as you would in Unix. – Raúl Salinas-Monteagudo May 22 at 7:18
4

Here's a function I wrote which works similarly to the Unix time command:

function time {
    Param(
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
        [string]$command,
        [switch]$quiet = $false
    )
    $start = Get-Date
    try {
        if ( -not $quiet ) {
            iex $command | Write-Host
        } else {
            iex $command > $null
        }
    } finally {
        $(Get-Date) - $start
    }
}

Source: https://gist.github.com/bender-the-greatest/741f696d965ed9728dc6287bdd336874

  • The question was "Timing a command's execution in PowerShell". What does that have to do with timing a process using Unix? – Jean-Claude DeMars Sep 8 '17 at 22:19
  • 4
    It's a Powershell function I wrote, which shows how to calculate the execution time yourself as opposed to using Measure-Command or one of the various other ways you can time execution in Powershell. If you read the original question, he asked for something that works "like the time command in Linux". – Bender the Greatest Sep 14 '17 at 17:07
3

Using Stopwatch and formatting elapsed time:

Function FormatElapsedTime($ts) 
{
    $elapsedTime = ""

    if ( $ts.Minutes -gt 0 )
    {
        $elapsedTime = [string]::Format( "{0:00} min. {1:00}.{2:00} sec.", $ts.Minutes, $ts.Seconds, $ts.Milliseconds / 10 );
    }
    else
    {
        $elapsedTime = [string]::Format( "{0:00}.{1:00} sec.", $ts.Seconds, $ts.Milliseconds / 10 );
    }

    if ($ts.Hours -eq 0 -and $ts.Minutes -eq 0 -and $ts.Seconds -eq 0)
    {
        $elapsedTime = [string]::Format("{0:00} ms.", $ts.Milliseconds);
    }

    if ($ts.Milliseconds -eq 0)
    {
        $elapsedTime = [string]::Format("{0} ms", $ts.TotalMilliseconds);
    }

    return $elapsedTime
}

Function StepTimeBlock($step, $block) 
{
    Write-Host "`r`n*****"
    Write-Host $step
    Write-Host "`r`n*****"

    $sw = [Diagnostics.Stopwatch]::StartNew()
    &$block
    $sw.Stop()
    $time = $sw.Elapsed

    $formatTime = FormatElapsedTime $time
    Write-Host "`r`n`t=====> $step took $formatTime"
}

Usage Samples

StepTimeBlock ("Publish {0} Reports" -f $Script:ArrayReportsList.Count)  { 
    $Script:ArrayReportsList | % { Publish-Report $WebServiceSSRSRDL $_ $CarpetaReports $CarpetaDataSources $Script:datasourceReport };
}

StepTimeBlock ("My Process")  {  .\do_something.ps1 }
0

Measure-Command {echo "Good morning World!" | Write-Host}

Source - https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/issues/2289#issuecomment-247793839

  • 2
    Your answer seems a duplicate of longstanding answers already voted up on this question. As such, it risks being downvoted for not adding any value. As you are new, I won't do that myself, but others might not take the time to comment rather than downvote. – Burt_Harris Oct 11 '18 at 18:28

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