1482

Is there a solid way to detect whether or not a user is using a mobile device in jQuery? Something similar to the CSS @media attribute? I would like to run a different script if the browser is on a handheld device.

The jQuery $.browser function is not what I am looking for.

  • 6
    Provide a mobile URL specifically for mobile devices. This is how most major sites handle mobile devices. See m.google.com. – meagar Aug 18 '10 at 17:27
  • 6
    jQuery does not, and cannot do everything. It is provides cross-browser DOM traversal and manipulation, simple animation and ajax between browsers, and creates a skeleton framework for plugins to build upon. Please be aware of jQuery's limitations before asking specifically for a jQuery solution. – Yi Jiang Aug 22 '10 at 5:38
  • 74
    User agents are constantly moving targets, everyone reading this post should be very wary of user agent sniffing – Rob Jan 9 '12 at 10:38
  • 42
    What's a 'mobile' device? Is it a device that supports touch (including Chrome Pixels and Windows 8 laptops with mice)? Is it a device with a small screen (what about retina iPads)? Is it a device with a slow CPU? Or a device with a slow internet connection? Depending on what you want to do the answer to this question will vary. To target screen resolution or touch is easy. If you want to serve up smaller content or less intensive JS for some devices, then there's no silver bullet. Test for window.navigator.connection and fall back to (nasty, bad, ill-advised) userAgent sniffing. My 2 cents. – David Gilbertson Jul 9 '13 at 4:42
  • 2
    @Cole"Cole9"Johnson My point exactly. 'Mobile' seems to be used as an umbrella term for touch, slow CPU, slow network and small screen. But none of these are perfect assumptions. I believe that considering these individually will result in a better product than designing for some vague concept of 'mobile'. Hence me posing that question to the OP. – David Gilbertson Aug 20 '13 at 2:38

50 Answers 50

3

You can also detect it like below

$.isIPhone = function(){
    return ((navigator.platform.indexOf("iPhone") != -1) || (navigator.platform.indexOf("iPod") != -1));

};
$.isIPad = function (){
    return (navigator.platform.indexOf("iPad") != -1);
};
$.isAndroidMobile  = function(){
    var ua = navigator.userAgent.toLowerCase();
    return ua.indexOf("android") > -1 && ua.indexOf("mobile");
};
$.isAndroidTablet  = function(){
    var ua = navigator.userAgent.toLowerCase();
    return ua.indexOf("android") > -1 && !(ua.indexOf("mobile"));
};
3

This is my code I'm using in my projects:

function isMobile() {
 try {
    if(/Android|webOS|iPhone|iPad|iPod|pocket|psp|kindle|avantgo|blazer|midori|Tablet|Palm|maemo|plucker|phone|BlackBerry|symbian|IEMobile|mobile|ZuneWP7|Windows Phone|Opera Mini/i.test(navigator.userAgent)) {
     return true;
    };
    return false;
 } catch(e){ console.log("Error in isMobile"); return false; }
}
2

You could also use server side script and set javascript variables from it.

Example in php

download http://code.google.com/p/php-mobile-detect/ and then set javascript variables.

<script>
//set defaults
var device_type = 'desktop';
</script>

<?php
require_once( 'Mobile_Detect.php');
$detect = new Mobile_Detect();
?>

<script>
device_type="<?php echo ($detect->isMobile() ? ($detect->isTablet() ? 'tablet' : 'mobile') : 'desktop'); ?>";
alert( device_type);
</script>
2

I tried some of the ways and then I decided to fill a list manually and do a simple JS check. And in the end the user has to confirm. Because some checks gave false positive or negative.

var isMobile = false;
if (/Android|webOS|iPhone|iPad|iPod|BlackBerry|IEMobile|Opera Mini|Opera Mobile|Kindle|Windows Phone|PSP|AvantGo|Atomic Web Browser|Blazer|Chrome Mobile|Dolphin|Dolfin|Doris|GO Browser|Jasmine|MicroB|Mobile Firefox|Mobile Safari|Mobile Silk|Motorola Internet Browser|NetFront|NineSky|Nokia Web Browser|Obigo|Openwave Mobile Browser|Palm Pre web browser|Polaris|PS Vita browser|Puffin|QQbrowser|SEMC Browser|Skyfire|Tear|TeaShark|UC Browser|uZard Web|wOSBrowser|Yandex.Browser mobile/i.test(navigator.userAgent) && confirm('Are you on a mobile device?')) isMobile = true;

Now, if you want to use jQuery to set the CSS, you could do the following:

$(document).ready(function() {
  if (isMobile) $('link[type="text/css"]').attr('href', '/mobile.css');
});

Since the borders between mobile and fixed devices become fluent and mobile browers are already powerful, checking width and user confirmation will probably be the best for the future (assuming that width in some cases will still be important). Because touches are already converted into mouse-ups and downs.

And concerning the mobile movability, I suggest you to think about Yoav Barnea's idea:

if(typeof window.orientation !== 'undefined'){...}
  • Any sort of required user confirmation for something that should be internal and not bother him in any way is a tragic user experience detail. – mystrdat May 27 '14 at 20:06
2
function isDeviceMobile(){
 var isMobile = {
  Android: function() {
      return navigator.userAgent.match(/Android/i) && navigator.userAgent.match(/mobile|Mobile/i);
  },
  BlackBerry: function() {
      return navigator.userAgent.match(/BlackBerry/i)|| navigator.userAgent.match(/BB10; Touch/);
  },
  iOS: function() {
      return navigator.userAgent.match(/iPhone|iPod/i);
  },
  Opera: function() {
      return navigator.userAgent.match(/Opera Mini/i);
  },
  Windows: function() {
      return navigator.userAgent.match(/IEMobile/i) || navigator.userAgent.match(/webOS/i) ;
  },
  any: function() {
      return (isMobile.Android() || isMobile.BlackBerry() || isMobile.iOS() || isMobile.Opera() || isMobile.Windows());
  }
};      
 return isMobile.any()
}
2

I use this

if(navigator.userAgent.search("mobile")>0 ){
         do something here
}
2

Checkout http://detectmobilebrowsers.com/ which provides you script for detecting mobile device in variety of languages including

JavaScript, jQuery, PHP, JSP, Perl, Python, ASP, C#, ColdFusion and many more

2

Also I recommend using the tiny JavaScript library Bowser, yes no r. It is based on the navigator.userAgent and quite well tested for all browsers including iPhone, Android etc.

https://github.com/ded/bowser

You can use simply say:

if (bowser.msie && bowser.version <= 6) {
  alert('Hello China');
} else if (bowser.firefox){
  alert('Hello Foxy');
} else if (bowser.chrome){
  alert('Hello Silicon Valley');
} else if (bowser.safari){
  alert('Hello Apple Fan');
} else if(bowser.iphone || bowser.android){
  alert('Hello mobile');
}
1
var device = {
  detect: function(key) {
    if(this['_'+key] === undefined) {
      this['_'+key] = navigator.userAgent.match(new RegExp(key, 'i'));
    }
    return this['_'+key];
  },
  iDevice: function() {
    return this.detect('iPhone') || this.detect('iPod');
  },
  android: function() {
    return this.detect('Android');
  },
  webOS: function() {
    return this.detect('webOS');
  },
  mobile: function() {
    return this.iDevice() || this.android() || this.webOS();
  }
};

I've used something like this in the past. This is similar to a previous response, but it's technically more performant in that it caches the result of the match, especially if the detection is being used in an animation, scroll event, or the like.

  • Why would you need to call this code in an animation/scroll event/etc.? – reformed Sep 21 '17 at 14:44
1

This seems to be a comprehensive, modern solution:

https://github.com/matthewhudson/device.js

It detects several platforms, smartphone vs. tablets, and orientation. It also adds classes to the BODY tag so detection takes place only once and you can read what device you're on with a simple series of jQuery hasClass functions.

Check it out...

[DISCLAIMER: I've got nothing to do with the person who wrote it.]

  • +1 for the small and neat device.js. But I wouldn't exactly call it a "modern solution", at it's core it uses user agent sniffing. I also wouldn't call it "comprehensive", ua-parser on the other hand is. – Anthony Hatzopoulos Sep 13 '14 at 16:59
1

http://www.w3schools.com/jsref/prop_nav_useragent.asp

Filter by platform name.

Ex:

x = $( window ).width();

platform = navigator.platform;

alert(platform);

if ( (platform != Ipad) || (x < 768) )  {


} 

^^

1

If by a mobile device you understand a touchable one, then you can determine it by checking existence of touch handlers:

let deviceType = (('ontouchstart' in window)
                 || (navigator.maxTouchPoints > 0)
                 || (navigator.msMaxTouchPoints > 0)
                 ) ? 'touchable' : 'desktop';

jQuery is not needed for it.

1

Adding:

In some versions of iOS 9.x, Safari does not present the "iPhone" in navigator.userAgent, but show it in navigator.platform.

var isMobile = /Android|webOS|iPhone|iPad|iPod|BlackBerry/i.test(navigator.userAgent);
    if(!isMobile){
        isMobile=/iPhone|iPad|iPod/i.test(navigator.platform);
    }
1

I know this old question and there is a lot of answer but I think this function is simple and will help for detect all mobile, Tablet and computer browser it work like a charm.

function Device_Type() 
{
    var Return_Device; 
    if(/(up.browser|up.link|mmp|symbian|smartphone|midp|wap|phone|android|iemobile|w3c|acs\-|alav|alca|amoi|audi|avan|benq|bird|blac|blaz|brew|cell|cldc|cmd\-|dang|doco|eric|hipt|inno|ipaq|java|jigs|kddi|keji|leno|lg\-c|lg\-d|lg\-g|lge\-|maui|maxo|midp|mits|mmef|mobi|mot\-|moto|mwbp|nec\-|newt|noki|palm|pana|pant|phil|play|port|prox|qwap|sage|sams|sany|sch\-|sec\-|send|seri|sgh\-|shar|sie\-|siem|smal|smar|sony|sph\-|symb|t\-mo|teli|tim\-|tosh|tsm\-|upg1|upsi|vk\-v|voda|wap\-|wapa|wapi|wapp|wapr|webc|winw|winw|xda|xda\-) /i.test(navigator.userAgent))
    {
        if(/(tablet|ipad|playbook)|(android(?!.*(mobi|opera mini)))/i.test(navigator.userAgent)) 
        {
            Return_Device = 'Tablet';
        }
        else
        {
            Return_Device = 'Mobile';
        }
    }
    else if(/(tablet|ipad|playbook)|(android(?!.*(mobi|opera mini)))/i.test(navigator.userAgent)) 
    {
        Return_Device = 'Tablet';
    }
    else
    {
        Return_Device = 'Desktop';
    }

    return Return_Device;
}
1

Here is one more suggestion implemented with pure JavaScript (es6)

const detectDeviceType = () =>
    /Android|webOS|iPhone|iPad|iPod|BlackBerry|IEMobile|Opera Mini/i.test(navigator.userAgent)
        ? 'Mobile'
        : 'Desktop';

detectDeviceType();
0

These are all of the vaules I am aware of. Please help udating the array if you know of any other values.

function ismobile(){
   if(/android|webos|iphone|ipad|ipod|blackberry|opera mini|Windows Phone|iemobile|WPDesktop|XBLWP7/i.test(navigator.userAgent.toLowerCase())) {
       return true;
   }
   else
    return false;
}
0

I do this for my .NET applications.

In my shared _Layout.cshtml Page, I add this.

@{
    var isMobileDevice = HttpContext.Current.Request.Browser.IsMobileDevice;
}

<html lang="en" class="@((isMobileDevice)?"ismobiledevice":"")">

Then to check on any page in your site (jQuery):

<script>
var isMobile = $('html').hasClass('ismobiledevice');
</script>
  • 1
    This doesn't relate to jQuery i'm afraid – Andrew Lazarus Jan 8 '16 at 8:57
0

Depending on what for you want to detect mobile (meaning this suggestion won't suit everyone's needs), you might be able to achieve a distinction by looking at the onmouseenter-to-onclick millisecond difference, like I described in this answer.

-4

Use this

if( screen.width <= 480 ) { 
    // is mobile 
}
  • 2
    ...and what happens if I have my desktop browser less than 480 in size? Why 480 anyway. I'd imagine there are phones when in landscape are wider than 480. – Liam Aug 2 '17 at 12:33
-6

If you want to test the user agent, the correct way is to, test the user agent, i.e. test navigator.userAgent.

If the user fakes this they are not due concern. If you test.isUnix() you should not subsequently have to worry if the system is Unix.

As a user changing userAgent is also fine, but you don't expect sites to render properly if you do.

If you wish to provide support for Microsoft browsers you should ensure the first few characters of the content includes and test every page you write.

Bottom line... Always code to the standards. Then hack it until it works in the current version of IE & don't expect it to look good. That's what GitHub does, and they just got given 100 million bucks.

protected by Community Mar 12 '14 at 13:52

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