10

I have a school assignment I need help with. Now, I know what you're thinking, but my teacher is out of town and hasn't answered my e-mails, and my other classmates have no clue how to solve this problem. A few pointers and tips would be greatly appreciated!

The assignment is this:

We're supposed to create an array, populate it with 20 to 30 random integers in the range of 1-100. Then, by the help of subroutines, we're supposed to calculate the average of these numbers.

The problem occurs when I'm calling the subroutine back, which gives me either answer 0 or the "Illegal division by 0" error. The code I have right now is this:

#! /usr/bin/perl -w

use warnings;
use strict;

# Declaring the scalar variables and arrays.
my @AllNumbers;

# Create random data set of between 20 to 30 measures used for the 100 random intigers.
my $random_number = int( rand( 31 - 20 ) ) + 20;

# Create random data set of 100 intigers.
for ( my $i = 0 ; $i <= $random_number ; $i++ ) {
    $AllNumbers[$i] = int( rand( 100 - 1 ) );
}

# Print the 20 to 30 random numbers (range 1 - 100).
print("Your random numbers are: \n@AllNumbers");

sub average {
    my $ArrayAverage = @_;
    for (@_) {
        my $total += $_;
    }
    return $ArrayAverage / $random_number;
} ## end sub average

# Print the mean/average of the 20-30 numbers.
print( "\n\nThe average of those random numbers is: ", &average, "\n\n" );

Now, as I said, I'd like to solve this problem myself, and I've spent an entire two days with this, but can't seem to solve it no matter what I do. Any tips would be greatly appreciated. P.S. It should be mentioned that we're not supposed to use any modules/plugins.

  • 2
    BTW, if you need the range of the @AllNumbers to cover be 1 -100, you it should be done in a different way. Since this rand(100-1) which is the same as rand(99) which gives you a range 0 - 98. You need to look further into this and fix it ;) – Loukan ElKadi Feb 2 '16 at 11:54
  • 3
    Homework assistance isn't forbidden on Stack Overflow. It's just we'll help you understand it (and figure out the problem), not do it for you. – Sobrique Feb 2 '16 at 11:58
4

Nice work, so far! It's almost ok. But you are calling your average function without any parameters (&average). Try it like so:

sub average{
    my @Array_To_Average = @_; # this is now a local copy of the global @AllNumbers
    my $total = 0;
    for (@Array_To_Average) # iterate over the local copy ...
    { 
        $total += $_; # ...and sum up
    }
    return $total / $random_number;

    # instead of $random_number you could also use
    # scalar(@Array_To_Average). That's the number of items
    # in the array, i.e.
    #   return $total / scalar(@Array_To_Average);
}

print ("\n\nThe average of those random numbers is: ", average(@AllNumbers), "\n\n");

Please omit the & when calling functions. That's very old style. Prefer the style used in most other languages:

my $result1 = some_function();
my $result2 = some_other_function($param1, $param2);
  • Thank you so much for the help! I can't believe I missed that. Also, great tip about scalar(@Array_To_Average);, I had no idea that was a thing... – tobulos1 Feb 2 '16 at 11:59
  • 2
    scalar is needed if you need to force a scalar context. In particular, when you're printing. (print defaults to a list context). If you're doing a numeric operation (such as $num / @array) then the scalar context is already in place, so you don't need it. – Sobrique Feb 2 '16 at 12:22
9

There's a couple of style points I'd address first:

  • put your sub at the beginning (or if you must, at the end). Having it in the middle of code is messy.

  • Don't call subroutines with & - it's bad style, and makes for some strange behaviour. In your case: &average is effectively being called with no arguments. It's bad in general though, don't use it unless you know specifically why you're doing so. (It does have some uses, but you'll know when you see them - and you won't in your early learning of perl).

  • Capitalisation of arrays like that isn't good form, because that's how modules/packages are named. Stick with lower case variables if you can.

  • your for loop is a C style, which works, but would be better written for ( 1..$random_number ) { as you don't need the iterator.

  • You don't need -w on the shebang line, because you have use warnings. use warnings; is the better way of doing it.

  • calling your variable $random_number isn't very helpful - we can see that, because it's assigned the result for rand. Call it what it's used for - like $number_of_elements.

  • given you only really need to use $random_number once, you probably don't need to stick it in a variable. You can, if you feel it assists readability (that's a matter of taste - in good programming, being clear and readable is the only thing that's really important - most memory/performance things are premature optimisations given the state of compilers today.)

Your core problem here though, is this:

my $ArrayAverage = @_;

That sets $ArrayAverage to the number of elements in the list. This will always be the same as $random_number, because that's how many times you iterate.

You iterate elements here, but don't actually use $total.

for (@_) {
    my $total += $_;
}

So here - you're returning number of elements in array divided by number of elements in array.

return $ArrayAverage / $random_number;

But the really important thing is - none of this matters, because you're invoking it with &average which isn't actually sending any arguments. So you're just putting in zero, and getting out zero.

It may be useful to know - an array in a scalar context returns the number of elements, so computing your average is as simple as:

my $sum; 
$sum += $_ for @AllNumbers; 
print( "\n\nThe average of those random numbers is: ", $sum / @AllNumbers, "\n\n" );

This'll produce a long decimal - if you need to format it, you can use printf or sprintf.

printf( "\n\nThe average of those random numbers is: %02.2f \n\n", $sum / @AllNumbers);

So I would rewrite it slightly as this:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

# Declaring the scalar variables and arrays.
my @all_numbers;


#repeat 20 + random 11 times - so 20-30
for ( 1 .. 20 + int rand 11 ) { 
    push ( @all_numbers, int rand 99 );
}

# Print the 20 to 30 random numbers (range 1 - 100).
print("Your random numbers are: \n@all_numbers\n");

#calculate sum of elements
my $sum; 
$sum += $_ for @all_numbers;

print "Sum: $sum count: ", scalar @all_numbers, "\n"; 

# Print the mean/average of the 20-30 numbers.
printf( "\n\nThe average of those random numbers is: %02.2f \n\n", $sum / @all_numbers);
  • Wow, thank you! This information will come in handy. So much that our teacher didn't taught us... – tobulos1 Feb 2 '16 at 12:12
  • 5
    Well, at least you got the important bit - how to try for yourself, and ask a decent question on Stack Overflow. That's a valuable programming technique in and of itself! :) – Sobrique Feb 2 '16 at 13:45
6

Writing it in idiomatic Perl would give you something like this:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

my @numbers;

my $how_many = int(rand 11) + 20;

push @numbers, int(rand 100) + 1 for 1 .. $how_many;

print "Your random numbers are: \n@numbers\n";
print "The mean of those numbers is: ", average(@numbers), "\n";

sub average{
  my $total;
  $total += $_ for @_;
  return sprintf '%.2f', $total / @_;
}
4

Good job that you tried working it yourself before asking for help!

To debug your code try adding some prints to minimise the area where you need to look for the error in. So inthis case you can add print $random_number in the the average sub, and you'll notice that it's set correctly. While if you print the elements of the $ArrayAverage you'll find that it has no values, and that's simply because you need to pass the @AllNumbers array to the &average sub when you call it in the print at the last line of your script.

So the solution is that you simply need to pass the @AllNumbers array to the &average() when being called:

print ("\n\nThe average of those random numbers is: ", &average(@AllNumbers), "\n\n");

This should work fine ;) Good luck!

  • Actually, that's not the only problem. – Dave Cross Feb 2 '16 at 14:59
  • That worked for me. What am I missing? – Loukan ElKadi Feb 3 '16 at 5:47
  • 1
    In the original code, $total is reset to 0 each time round the loop. – Dave Cross Feb 3 '16 at 6:59
  • Good catch! I didn't notice that one, I noticed the rand(99) wrong range but missed this one. Thanks for the note! – Loukan ElKadi Feb 3 '16 at 7:05
1

The (main) problem is that you call your sub with no arguments! Try this:

average($_) foreach @AllNumbers;

my $count = 0;
my $total;
my $average;

sub average{
    my $num = shift;
    $count++; # count number of random numbers 
    $total += $num; # sum up
    $average = $total/$count; # calculate average
    return $average;
}

# Print the mean/average of the 20-30 numbers.
print ("\n\nThe average of those random numbers is: ", $average, "\n\n");
  • 2
    I'm not convinced that's a good way to do an average function. I might pass it the whole array, and get it to return the average. Or use an iterator. But to have a my $average outside the sub, which you then return seems a bit odd. – Sobrique Feb 2 '16 at 12:28
0

Got it to work to help you out.

#! /usr/bin/perl -w

use warnings;
use strict;

# Declaring the scalar variables and arrays.
my @AllNumbers;
my $avgOfArray;

# Create random data set of between 20 to 30 measures used for the 100         random intigers.
my $random_number = int(rand(31 - 20)) + 20;

# Create random data set of 100 intigers.
for(my $i = 0; $i <= $random_number; $i++){
    $AllNumbers[$i] = int(rand(100 - 1));
}

# Print the 20 to 30 random numbers (range 1 - 100).
print ("Your random numbers are: \n@AllNumbers");
sub average {
    my @array = @_; # save the array passed to this function
    my $sum; # create a variable to hold the sum of the array's values
    foreach (@array) { $sum += $_; } # add each element of the array
    # to the sum
    return $sum/@array; # divide sum by the number of elements in the
    # array to find the mean
}
$avgOfArray = average(@AllNumbers);

# Print the mean/average of the 20-30 numbers.
print ("\n\nThe average of those random numbers is: ",  $avgOfArray,     "\n\n"); here
  • 2
    Ugh, at least run it through perltidy to indent it... – Sobrique Feb 2 '16 at 12:30
0

You need to pass parameters to your average subroutine:

#!/usr/bin/perl

sub average{
  my $tot;
  $tot += $_ for @_;
  return sprintf '%.3f', $tot / @_;
}
my @num;

my $quantity = int(rand 11) + 20;    
push @num, int(rand 100) + 1 for 1 .. $quantity;

print "Random numbers: \t@num\n";
print "Average: ", average(@num), "\n";

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