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I was playing the the Python's import system in order to understand better how it works, and I encountered another problem. I have the following structure

pkg/
    __init__.py
    c.py
    d.py

    subpkg/
        __init__.py
        a.py
        b.py

Inside a.py I have the following code:

from . import b
from .. import d

And inside c.py I have the following:

import subpkg.a

Now I receive the following error:

ValueError: attempted relative import beyond top-level package

But why? How can I solve it? I am running c.py from the IDLE, and pkg should be considered a package, since it has the __init__.py file.

The first import works fine, but it's the following that doesn't work:

from .. import d

Because I am attempting to import something from a parent package, but apparently I cannot, for some weird reason.

4

Python 3 changed the import system so every time you want a module that is around the one you are working, you need relative imports (unless you mess with PYTHONPATH or sys.path).

The correct usage here should be

from .subpkg import a

When you are working with IDLE, you have a totally different environment. Therefore, you could add the current location to your path so imports work again.

try:

sys.path.insert(0, '')

It might be weird, but it is for a greater good

PS: If this last thing do not work -- I don't have an IDLE environment right now -- it is probably because the work directory is set wrong.

Try this answer instead: https://stackoverflow.com/a/17361545/754991

  • If I do from .subpkg import a I receive: SystemError: Parent module '' not loaded, cannot perform relative import from the IDLE and from the terminal... – nbro Feb 3 '16 at 2:27
  • @nbro that's because you are inside IDLE, but when you run it inside a module, the import should be that way. IDLE is a terrible IDE and bad for python development in general. The option that works best on both IDLE and inside modules is to use the full package name: from pkg import subpkg.a after adding the directory for pkg on sys.path – JBernardo Feb 3 '16 at 11:22
  • What do you mean: "when you run it inside a module"? I said, I run the file c.py (as main) both from the terminal and the IDLE as you suggested, and it gives me the error I am mentioning above. IDLE is a terrible IDE but it comes with Python? What would be the purpose of carrying a terrible IDE? You can say that IDLE is a simplistic IDE that for sure is not one of the best, but it should theoretically work well with Python, otherwise nothing makes sense. – nbro Feb 3 '16 at 14:59
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    I have played a little bit with what you said and the Python's import system in general, and I think I understood more how it works. Basically, there's the distinction between running files as "main" and as modules or packages imported by other modules or by a "main" file. If you have just one file that runs the whole application, you can do relative imports between the submodules and subpackages. On the other hand, as you are saying, relative imports do not work in a a file run as "main". This is unfortunately a bad limitation... – nbro Feb 3 '16 at 17:46
  • 27
    from .subpkg import a doesn't answer the question. The question is asking how to from .. import d. – endolith Jun 18 '17 at 14:06

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