4

I am used to using common table expressions (CTEs) with MSSQL 2008 R2. I know that the grammar is a bit fiddly about where they can appear, and that in ordinary T-SQL an explicit semicolon (or starting a new batch) is needed before a with expression. I would like to use CTEs in a user-defined function. For simple cases, this works:

create function dbo.udf_test()
returns table
with schemabinding
as
return (
  with foo as (
    select 5 as f
  )
  select f
  from foo
)

But now I would like to make my function udf_test a bit more elaborate. For example to declare a variable inside the body of the function. To start with I need to have explicit begin and end since the function body will no longer be a single statement. So I try to create one thus:

create function dbo.udf_test()
returns table
with schemabinding
as
begin
  return (
    with foo as (
      select 5 as f
    )
    select f
    from foo
  )
end

However this gives the error

Incorrect syntax near the keyword 'with'.

How can I use a CTE in my table-valued function if it is more complex than a single return statement?

2
  • 1
    If you add more than 1 statement to your inline table valued function it will not longer be an inline table valued function. It will become a multi-statement table valued function. As such, the performance is going to tank horrifically. Often these are even worse than scalar functions. BTW, you do not need to wrap your return in parenthesis like that.
    – Sean Lange
    Feb 3, 2016 at 17:04
  • Thanks for the tip. In this particular case the function is not embedded in any larger query, but is called directly and the results inserted directly into another table. So I am not concerned about whether the optimizer can 'see through' the function definition by inlining it. Still I will keep an eye out for slowdowns.
    – Ed Avis
    Feb 3, 2016 at 20:24

1 Answer 1

7
CREATE FUNCTION dbo.udf_test()
RETURNS 
@return TABLE 
(
    f int NOT NULL
)
AS
BEGIN

    WITH foo AS (
        SELECT 5 AS f
    )
    INSERT INTO @return
    SELECT f
    FROM foo;

    RETURN;
END

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