I'm trying to create a regular expression for matching latitude/longitude coordinates. For matching a double-precision number I've used (\-?\d+(\.\d+)?), and tried to combine that into a single expression:

^(\-?\d+(\.\d+)?),\w*(\-?\d+(\.\d+)?)$

I expected this to match a double, a comma, perhaps some space, and another double, but it doesn't seem to work. Specifically it only works if there's NO space, not one or more. What have I done wrong?

16 Answers 16

up vote 93 down vote accepted

Whitespace is \s, not \w

^(\-?\d+(\.\d+)?),\s*(\-?\d+(\.\d+)?)$

See if this works

  • 1
    I had to use dot instead of comma: /^(\-?\d+(\.\d+)?) hereAdot . endMod \s*(\-?\d+(\.\d+)?)$/ – misher May 24 '16 at 7:41
  • It accepts values out side the allowed range for lats and longs. eg, 91,181 – Arun Karunagath May 2 at 11:01
  • This works for x/y-coordinates of projected spatial reference systems as well – DeEgge May 31 at 8:14

This one will strictly match latitude and longitude values that fall within the correct range:

^[-+]?([1-8]?\d(\.\d+)?|90(\.0+)?),\s*[-+]?(180(\.0+)?|((1[0-7]\d)|([1-9]?\d))(\.\d+)?)$

Matches

  • +90.0, -127.554334
  • 45, 180
  • -90, -180
  • -90.000, -180.0000
  • +90, +180
  • 47.1231231, 179.99999999

Doesn't Match

  • -90., -180.
  • +90.1, -100.111
  • -91, 123.456
  • 045, 180
  • This is awesome. Kudos for the range check inclusion. – radj Feb 23 '15 at 4:17
  • 1
    I think you have a typo in your first matches example. I doubt that the RegEx will match 3 values. – Burkhard May 7 '15 at 7:48
  • Fixed. It was meant to be two separate examples. – Iain Fraser May 19 '15 at 3:18
  • 6
    Modified to accept white-space on both sides of the comma: ^[-+]?([1-8]?\d(\.\d+)?|90(\.0+)?)\s*,\s*[-+]?(180(\.0+)?|((1[0-7]\d)|([1-9]?\d))(\.\d+)?)$ – puddinman13 Aug 11 '15 at 15:38
  • Thank you. Also, if you want to capture the polarity (+/-) just add parentheses around both [+-] groups. – wuher Nov 24 '16 at 22:47

I am using these ones (decimal format, with 6 decimal digits):

Latitude

^(\+|-)?(?:90(?:(?:\.0{1,6})?)|(?:[0-9]|[1-8][0-9])(?:(?:\.[0-9]{1,6})?))$

Latitude Regular expression visualization

Longitude

^(\+|-)?(?:180(?:(?:\.0{1,6})?)|(?:[0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-7][0-9])(?:(?:\.[0-9]{1,6})?))$

Longitude Regular expression visualization


Here is a gist that tests both, reported here also, for ease of access. It's a Java TestNG test. You need Slf4j, Hamcrest and Lombok to run it:

import static org.hamcrest.Matchers.*;
import static org.hamcrest.MatcherAssert.*;

import java.math.RoundingMode;
import java.text.DecimalFormat;

import lombok.extern.slf4j.Slf4j;

import org.testng.annotations.Test;

@Slf4j
public class LatLongValidationTest {

    protected static final String LATITUDE_PATTERN="^(\\+|-)?(?:90(?:(?:\\.0{1,6})?)|(?:[0-9]|[1-8][0-9])(?:(?:\\.[0-9]{1,6})?))$";
    protected static final String LONGITUDE_PATTERN="^(\\+|-)?(?:180(?:(?:\\.0{1,6})?)|(?:[0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-7][0-9])(?:(?:\\.[0-9]{1,6})?))$";

    @Test
    public void latitudeTest(){
        DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("#.######");
        df.setRoundingMode(RoundingMode.UP);
        double step = 0.01;
        Double latitudeToTest = -90.0;

        while(latitudeToTest <= 90.0){
            boolean result = df.format(latitudeToTest).matches(LATITUDE_PATTERN);
            log.info("Latitude: tested {}. Result (matches regex): {}", df.format(latitudeToTest), result);
            assertThat(result, is(true));
            latitudeToTest += step;
        }

        latitudeToTest = -90.1;

        while(latitudeToTest >= -200.0){
            boolean result = df.format(latitudeToTest).matches(LATITUDE_PATTERN);
            log.info("Latitude: tested {}. Result (matches regex): {}", df.format(latitudeToTest), result);
            assertThat(result, is(false));
            latitudeToTest -= step;
        }

        latitudeToTest = 90.01;

        while(latitudeToTest <= 200.0){
            boolean result = df.format(latitudeToTest).matches(LATITUDE_PATTERN);
        log.info("Latitude: tested {}. Result (matches regex): {}", df.format(latitudeToTest), result);
            assertThat(result, is(false));
            latitudeToTest += step;
        }
    }

    @Test
    public void longitudeTest(){
        DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("#.######");
        df.setRoundingMode(RoundingMode.UP);
        double step = 0.01;
        Double longitudeToTest = -180.0;

        while(longitudeToTest <= 180.0){
            boolean result = df.format(longitudeToTest).matches(LONGITUDE_PATTERN);
            log.info("Longitude: tested {}. Result (matches regex): {}", df.format(longitudeToTest), result);
            assertThat(result, is(true));
            longitudeToTest += step;
        }

        longitudeToTest = -180.01;

        while(longitudeToTest >= -300.0){
            boolean result = df.format(longitudeToTest).matches(LONGITUDE_PATTERN);
            log.info("Longitude: tested {}. Result (matches regex): {}", df.format(longitudeToTest), result);
            assertThat(result, is(false));
            longitudeToTest -= step;
        }

        longitudeToTest = 180.01;

        while(longitudeToTest <= 300.0){
            boolean result = df.format(longitudeToTest).matches(LONGITUDE_PATTERN);
            log.info("Longitude: tested {}. Result (matches regex): {}", df.format(longitudeToTest), result);
            assertThat(result, is(false));
            longitudeToTest += step;
        }
    }
}
  • This was a really nice regex! But is it possible to shorten it down a little? :) If it can't, it's okey but shorten code are always welcome :) – Erik Oct 9 '15 at 14:23
  • @ErikEdgren I did not find a way to shorten it :( – Marco Ferrari Oct 10 '15 at 13:29
  • 1
    Ok :/ Oh well. Your regex is still awesome ;) – Erik Oct 10 '15 at 22:35
  • 2
    nice visual :D Didn't know about this website ! Thank you ! – Damiii Feb 10 '16 at 22:26
  • 1
    @KarlMorrison you can use debuggex.com or jex.im/regulex – Marco Ferrari Sep 6 '17 at 13:21

Actually Alix Axel, above regex is wrong in latitude, longitude ranges point of view.

Latitude measurements range from –90° to +90° Longitude measurements range from –180° to +180°

So the regex given below validates more accurately.
Also, as per my thought no one should restrict decimal point in latitude/longitude.

^([-+]?\d{1,2}([.]\d+)?),\s*([-+]?\d{1,3}([.]\d+)?)$

OR for Objective C

^([-+]?\\d{1,2}([.]\\d+)?),\\s*([-+]?\\d{1,3}([.]\\d+)?)$
  • 2
    It accepts99 for Latitude, while 99 is out of range of -90, +90 and so invalid. – ako Sep 6 '17 at 5:47
^-?[0-9]{1,3}(?:\.[0-9]{1,10})?$

Regex breakdown:

^-?[0-9]{1,3}(?:\.[0-9]{1,10})?$

-? # accept negative values

^ # Start of string

[0-9]{1,3} # Match 1-3 digits (i. e. 0-999)

(?: # Try to match...

\. # a decimal point

[0-9]{1,10} # followed by one to 10 digits (i. e. 0-9999999999)

)? # ...optionally

$ # End of string

  • I think yours is the most elegant. Firstly, it worked immediately without having to edit and replace escape characters. Secondly, it is short. Thirdly, it is easy to understand. – Jim Rota Sep 21 '15 at 20:39

Try this:

^(\()([-+]?)([\d]{1,2})(((\.)(\d+)(,)))(\s*)(([-+]?)([\d]{1,3})((\.)(\d+))?(\)))$

Check it out at:

http://regexpal.com/

Paste the expression in the top box, then put things like this in the bottom box:

(80.0123, -34.034)
(80.0123)
(80.a)
(980.13, 40)
(99.000, 122.000)

Regex breakdown:

^                    # The string must start this way (there can't be anything before). 
    (\()             # An opening parentheses (escaped with a backslash).
    ([-+]?)          # An optional minus, or an optional plus.
    ([\d]{1,2})      # 1 or 2 digits (0-9).
    (                # Start of a sub-pattern.
        (            # Start of a sub-pattern.
            (\.)     # A dot (escaped with a backslash).
            (\d+)    # One or more digits (0-9).
            (,)      # A comma.
        )            # End of a sub-pattern.
    )                # End of a sub-pattern.
    (\s*)            # Zero or more spaces.
    (                # Start of a sub-pattern.
        ([-+]?)      # An optional minus, or an optional plus. 
        ([\d]{1,3})  # 1 to 3 digits (0-9).
        (            # Start of a pattern.
            (\.)     # A dot (escaped with a backslash).
            (\d+)    # One or more digits (0-9).
        )?           # End of an optional pattern.
        (\))         # A closing parenthesis (escaped with a backkslash).
    )                # End of a pattern
$                    # The string must end this way (there can't be anything after).

Now, what this does NOT do is restrict itself to this range:

(-90 to +90, and -180 to +180)

Instead, it simple restricts itself to this range:

(-99 to +99, -199 to +199) 

But the point is mainly just to break down each piece of the expression.

Here is a more strict version:

^([-+]?\d{1,2}[.]\d+),\s*([-+]?\d{1,3}[.]\d+)$
  • Latitude = -90 -- +90
  • Longitude = -180 -- +180
  • 1
    I believe that {1,2} should come first, then {1,3} – randunel Apr 2 '13 at 9:34
  • @Arjan: Fixed, I always confuse the two. Thanks! – Alix Axel Apr 23 '13 at 14:25

Python:

Latitude: result = re.match("^[+-]?((90\.?0*$)|(([0-8]?[0-9])\.?[0-9]*$))", '-90.00001')

Longitude: result = re.match("^[+-]?((180\.?0*$)|(((1[0-7][0-9])|([0-9]{0,2}))\.?[0-9]*$))", '-0.0000')

Latitude should fail in the example.

I believe you're using \w (word character) where you ought to be using \s (whitespace). Word characters typically consist of [A-Za-z0-9_], so that excludes your space, which then further fails to match on the optional minus sign or a digit.

this would work for format like this: 31 ͦ 37.4' E

^[-]?\d{1,2}[ ]ͦ[ ]\d{1,2}.?\d{1,2}[ ]\x27[ ]\w$

@macro-ferrari I did find a way to shorten it, and without look aheads in the light of all recent talks about regex engines

const LAT_RE = /^[+-]?(([1-8]?[0-9])(\.[0-9]{1,6})?|90(\.0{1,6})?)$/;

enter image description here

const LONG_RE = /^[+-]?((([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-7][0-9])(\.[0-9]{1,6})?)|180(\.0{1,6})?)$/;

enter image description here

Ruby

Longitude -179.99999999..180

/^(-?(?:1[0-7]|[1-9])?\d(?:\.\d{1,8})?|180(?:\.0{1,8})?)$/ === longitude.to_s

Latitude -89.99999999..90

/^(-?[1-8]?\d(?:\.\d{1,8})?|90(?:\.0{1,8})?)$/ === latitude.to_s

You can try this:

var latExp = /^(?=.)-?((8[0-5]?)|([0-7]?[0-9]))?(?:\.[0-9]{1,20})?$/;
var lngExp = /^(?=.)-?((0?[8-9][0-9])|180|([0-1]?[0-7]?[0-9]))?(?:\.[0-9]{1,20})?$/;

Try this:

^[-+]?(([0-8]\\d|\\d)(\\.\\d+)?|90(\\.0+)?)$,\s*^[-+]?((1[0-7]\\d(\\.\\d+)?)|(180(\\.0+)?)|(\\d\\d(\\.\\d+)?)|(\\d(\\.\\d+)?))$

Try this:

(?<!\d)([-+]?(?:[1-8]?\d(?:\.\d+)?|90(?:\.0+)?)),\s*([-+]?(?:180(?:\.0+)?|(?:(?:1[0-7]\d)|(?:[1-9]?\d))(?:\.\d+)?))(?!\d)`
  • 5
    Pure code answers are rarely a good idea. Please add some descriptive text to your answer. – timclutton Dec 4 '14 at 16:22
  • works great: validates accurately, and picks out lat, long from any surrounding text. Does not, however, limit the number of significant digits it allows after the decimal point. – user4325241 Dec 11 '14 at 16:55
/(-?\d{1,2}[.]\d+)(?U:.*)(-?1?[0-8]?\d[.]\d+)/

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