5

I have a directory with 100 files of the same format:

> S43.txt

Gene    S43-A1   S43-A10  S43-A11  S43-A12
DDX11L1 0       0       0       0 
WASH7P  0       0       0       0
C1orf86 0       15      0       1 



> S44.txt

Gene    S44-A1   S44-A10  S44-A11  S44-A12
DDX11L1 0       0       0       0 
WASH7P  0       0       0       0
C1orf86 0       15      0       1 

I want to make a giant table containing all the columns from all the files, however when I do this:

paste S88.txt S89.txt | column -d '\t' >test.merge

Naturally, the file contains two 'Gene' columns.

  1. How can I paste ALL the files in the directory at once?

  2. How can I exclude the first column from all the files after the first one?

Thank you.

3

use join with the --nocheck-order option:

join --nocheck-order S43.txt S44.txt | column -t

(the column -t command to make it pretty)

However, as you say you want to join all the files, and join only takes 2 at a time, you should be able to do this (assuming your shell is bash):

tmp=$(mktemp)
files=(*.txt)

cp "${files[0]}" result.file
for file in "${files[@]:1}"; do
    join --nocheck-order result.file "$file" | column -t > "$tmp" && mv "$tmp" result.file
done
  • Thanks for your answer. How can I exclude the first column, though? (in all files after the first one) – gaelgarcia Feb 3 '16 at 21:26
  • 1
    join takes care of that for you – glenn jackman Feb 3 '16 at 21:30
  • aahhh... brilliant. thanks! – gaelgarcia Feb 3 '16 at 21:35
4

If you're using bash, you can use process substitution in paste:

paste S43.txt <(cut -d ' ' -f2- S44.txt) | column -t
Gene     S43-A1  S43-A10  S43-A11  S43-A12  S44-A1  S44-A10  S44-A11  S44-A12
DDX11L1  0       0        0        0        0       0        0        0
WASH7P   0       0        0        0        0       0        0        0
C1orf86  0       15       0        1        0       15       0        1

(cut -d$'\t' -f2- S44.txt) will read all but first column in S44.txt file.

To do this for all the file matching S*.txt, use this snippet:

arr=(S*txt)
file="${arr[1]}"

for f in "${arr[@]:1}"; do
   paste "$file" <(cut -d$'\t' -f2- "$f") > _file.tmp && mv _file.tmp file.tmp
   file=file.tmp
done

# Clean up final output:
column -t file.tmp
  • Thanks! Do you know how I can merge all files in the directory at once while excluding the first column in all but the first one? – gaelgarcia Feb 3 '16 at 19:55
  • Strange... for some reason it still includes the first column for every file... might there be another way to specify not to? – gaelgarcia Feb 3 '16 at 21:51
  • 1
    Never mind -- just changed the delimiter to -d$'\t' . Works perfectly now. Thanks! – gaelgarcia Feb 3 '16 at 22:11

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