Do compilers compile a simple ternary statement to the same thing that they would compile a simple if else statement? Also, why would a compiler be designed to compile them differently?

For example, would this:

int a = 169;
int b = 420;
int c;
c = a > b ? 42:69;

compile to the same thing as this:

int a = 169;
int b = 420;
int c;
if(a>b) c = 42;
else c = 69;

This question is not about which is better or when to use each one, so please don't include that in your answer.

  • 4
    Do you know how to look at generated bytecode? stackoverflow.com/questions/3315938/… – Jeroen Vannevel Feb 3 '16 at 23:32
  • 1
    Are you asking about some particular compiler? The two snippets are semantically equivalent and it would be perfectly legal for a compiler to produce the same bytecode for the two snippets. – aioobe Feb 3 '16 at 23:36
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    There are two levels of compilation in a typical Java implementation: from Java source code to Java bytecode, and from Java bytecode to machine code. Which are you asking about? If you care about speed, the second is more important than the first. – Jeffrey Bosboom Feb 3 '16 at 23:54
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    @Andreas Regardless of wether it impacts my, it is still an interesting question. One typically asks questions when they do not know the answer to something. Even if the answer is useless, it may help you understand something relevant in the future. – 10 Replies Feb 4 '16 at 0:02
  • 1
    @Andreas different statements, yes. But, they do exactly the same thing. – 10 Replies Feb 4 '16 at 0:08
up vote 6 down vote accepted

First of all, this is implementation-dependent. The JLS does not specify exactly how a specific snippet or operation must be compiled, as long as the bytecode satistifes the Java Language Specification when run on a VM supporting the Java Virtual Machine specification. A different compiler can generate bytecode that is different from the examples given, as long as it gives the same result when run on a compliant JVM.

On Java 8's javac (1.8.0_65), the code is not the same for the conditional operator, and the if-else.

The ternary operator controls which value is pushed to the stack, and then the value on the top of the stack is stored unconditionally. In this case, if a>b, 42 is pushed and code jumps to the istore, else 59 is pushed. Then whatever value is on top is istored to c.

In the if-else, the conditional controls which istore instruction is actually called.

Notice however that in both cases the instruction is "compare less than or equal" which jumps to the else branch (continuing the if branch otherwise).

Below can be seen the bytecode generated by various compilers. You can get it yourself using the javap tool available in an OpenJDK JDK (example command-line javap -c ClassName)

javac with ternary:

  public static void main(java.lang.String...);
    Code:
       0: sipush        169
       3: istore_1
       4: sipush        420
       7: istore_2
       8: iload_1
       9: iload_2
      10: if_icmple     18
      13: bipush        42
      15: goto          20
      18: bipush        69
      20: istore_3
      21: return

javac with if-else:

  public static void main(java.lang.String...);
    Code:
       0: sipush        169
       3: istore_1
       4: sipush        420
       7: istore_2
       8: iload_1
       9: iload_2
      10: if_icmple     19
      13: bipush        42
      15: istore_3
      16: goto          22
      19: bipush        69
      21: istore_3
      22: return
}

However, with ecj, the code is even more odd. Ternary operator conditionally pushes one or the other value, then pops it to discard it (without storing):

Code:
   0: sipush        169
   3: istore_1
   4: sipush        420
   7: istore_2
   8: iload_1
   9: iload_2
  10: if_icmple     18
  13: bipush        42
  15: goto          20
  18: bipush        69
  20: pop
  21: return

ecj with if-else somehow optimizes out the pushes/stores but still includes an oddball comparison (mind you, there are no side effects to the comparison that need to be retained):

Code:
   0: sipush        169
   3: istore_1
   4: sipush        420
   7: istore_2
   8: iload_1
   9: iload_2
  10: if_icmple     13
  13: return

When I add a System.out.println(c) to foil this unused-value discard, I find that the structure of both statements is similar to that of javac (ternary does conditional push and fixed store, while if-else does conditional store).

  • This is implementation dependent. It would be perfectly fine to compile both snippets to the same bytecode. You might want to mention which compiler you're talking about here. – aioobe Feb 3 '16 at 23:34
  • @aioobe Added, thanks. – Andrey Akhmetov Feb 3 '16 at 23:39
  • Why would your compiler be designed to compile them differently? Is there an advantage? – 10 Replies Feb 3 '16 at 23:44
  • @10Replies Not necessarily an advantage, but a compiler might be designed based on a given structure or pattern, and certain outputs will fit its parsing and conversion steps better. – Andrey Akhmetov Feb 3 '16 at 23:45
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    Your bytecode samples feed the false hope that there is a definitive answer to the question. Why provide these samples if the answer is "it depends on god-knows-what"? – Andreas Vogl Feb 4 '16 at 0:09

To a compiler, the following is one statement with a ternary expression:

c = a > b ? 42 : 69;

To a compiler, the following is three different statements:

if (a > b) {  // statement 1
    c = 42;   // statement 2
} else {
    c = 69;   // statement 3
}

Each statement is compiled to byte code independently of other statements.

Analyzing separate statements to detect commonality, and rearranging the code to generate "better" byte code is called optimization, and is entirely optional.

Most people compile without optimization, because compile-time optimization is fairly ineffective vs. run-time optimization, and compile-time optimization prevents (complicates) debugging code, since the generated code would no longer be directly related to the source code line numbers.

Example: If left-hand side was instead myObj.myField, then it could generate NullPointerException if myObj is null. If compiler rearranged code, any stack trace would not be able to tell which line caused the exception.

There is no way to answer this question at a broad scale. VM languages such as java will optimize bytcode at runtime using very complex algorithms. Please see What does a just-in-time (JIT) compiler do?.

Purely compiler-based languages are somewhat more predictable, but then we would need to look at individual combinations of language, os, compiler version etc.

Trust your compiler and/or virtual machine to optimize easy stuff like that for you. It can do much more sophisticated optimizations.

  • So, your answer is that there is no answer? Does that count as an answer? Can you at least answer the second part of my question? – 10 Replies Feb 3 '16 at 23:46
  • I cannot make any sense of your second question: "Why would a compiler be designed to compile them differently". Yes, why indeed? Nobody will design a compiler to solve the same problem in different ways. The ternary operator is all about coding convenience, nothing more. – Andreas Vogl Feb 3 '16 at 23:53
  • Why would you want to program a compiler to compile the ternary and the if/else differently? – 10 Replies Feb 3 '16 at 23:53
  • @10Replies You wouldn't, unless it fell out of how the compiler is organized internally. – user207421 Feb 3 '16 at 23:56
  • I can't think of any reason. – Andreas Vogl Feb 3 '16 at 23:56

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