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I'm trying to evaluate appropriate checksum based on CRC-16 algorithm using crcmod Python module and 2.7 version of Python interpreter. The checksum parameters are:

  • CRC order: 16
  • CRC polynomial: 0x8005
  • Inital value: 0xFFFF
  • Final value: 0x0000
  • Direct: True

Code:

crc16 = crcmod.mkCrcFun(0x18005, rev=False, initCrc=0xFFFF, xorOut=0x0000)
print hex(crc16(str(int(0x5A0001))))

and for the input 0x5A0001 it prints 0x7E16 while I should get something like 0xCE0A.

I checked on http://www.lokker.net/Java/crc/CRCcalculation2.htm and the computed value is 0xACE which is correct (with respect to the order).

  • 2
    Looks like you have 0x18005 as your polynomial in the python code, but you listed 0x8005 in your checksum parameters above. – djhoese Feb 4 '16 at 16:09
  • 1
    No, 0x18005 is correct for crcmod. That package determines the number of bits in the CRC from the complete polynomial. It is common to provide a CRC polynomial without the high term, e.g. 0x8005 and separately specify that it is a 16-bit CRC. – Mark Adler Feb 5 '16 at 0:23
  • First off, you created c16 and then tried to use crc16. Did you mean c16? Second, what exactly do you think you are computing the CRC of? You do know that str(int(0x5A0001)) returns the string of ASCII digits 5898241, yes? What did you input into the web CRC calculator? – Mark Adler Feb 5 '16 at 0:30
  • Yes, it was a typo. The input into the calcuator was %5A%00%01 with appropriate parameters. – Qrlet Feb 5 '16 at 6:11
  • Consider also binascii.crc_hqx(data, 0): docs here – hoc_age Oct 24 at 2:48
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crcmod is working fine. You are not giving it the three bytes you think you are giving it. Your str(int(0x5A0001)) is providing seven bytes, which are the ASCII characters 5898241 — the conversion of 0x5a0001 to decimal.

To feed it the bytes 0x5a 0x00 0x01, you would instead (as one approach):

print hex(crc16("5a0001".decode("hex")))

That prints 0xace.

  • Thanks Mark! Now the crc is being calculated properly. Is it possible to express those 3 separate bytes: 0x5a 0x00 0x01 as one integer or am i missing something? – Qrlet Feb 7 '16 at 15:01
  • Sure, you could write something to extract those three bytes from the integer 0x5a0001, e.g. (x >> 16) & 0xff, (x >> 8) & 0xff, and x & 0xff. But why would you want to do that? – Mark Adler Feb 7 '16 at 15:26
  • I was thinking how to divide 0x5a0001 into those 3 bytes without using .decode(str). In other words, how i can for example calculate the checksum for 0x5a00 and 0x01 ? – Qrlet Feb 9 '16 at 9:42
  • First you would need to know decide somehow many bytes to use from each integer. Is it 0x5a00 or 0x005a00 or 0x00005a00? It doesn't make sense to ask "what is the CRC of 0x5a00", since a CRC is applied to a sequence of bytes (or bits), not to integers. – Mark Adler Feb 9 '16 at 14:39
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Here is a python implementation of CRC-16/CCITT-FALSE

def crc16(data : bytearray, offset , length):
    if data is None or offset < 0 or offset > len(data)- 1 and offset+length > len(data):
        return 0
    crc = 0xFFFF
    for i in range(0, length):
        crc ^= data[offset + i] << 8
        for j in range(0,8):
            if (crc & 0x8000) > 0:
                crc =(crc << 1) ^ 0x1021
            else:
                crc = crc << 1
    return crc & 0xFFFF
  • data : bytearray of the data you want to calculate CRC for
  • offset : from which offset you want to start calculating CRC
  • length : to which offset you want to calculate CRC
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def crc16(data : bytearray, offset , length): if data is None or offset < 0 or offset > len(data)- 1 and offset+length > len(data): return 0 print("uzunluk=",len(data)) print(data)

crc = 0xFFFF
for i in range(0, length):
    crc ^= data[offset + i]
    for j in range(0,8):
        print(crc)
        if ((crc & 0x1) == 1):
            print("bb1=",crc)
            crc =int((crc / 2)) ^ 40961
            print("bb2=",crc)
        else:
            crc = int(crc / 2)
return crc & 0xFFFF
  • 1
    Code is broken + can you add a short description? – RtmY May 1 at 8:25

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