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The code I'm working on uses some very convoluted macro voodoo in order to generate code, but in the end there is a construct that looks like this

#define ARGS 1,2,3

#define MACROFUNC_OUTER(PARAMS) MACROFUNC_INNER(PARAMS)
#define MACROFUNC_INNER(A,B,C) A + B + C

int a = MACROFUNC_OUTER(ARGS);

What is expected is to get

int a = 1 + 2 + 3;

This works well for the compiler it has originally been written for (GHS) and also for GCC, but MSVC (2008) considers PARAMS as a single preprocessing token that it won't expand, setting then A to the whole PARAM and B and C to nothing. The result is this

int a = 1,2,3 +  + ;

while MSVC warns that not enough actual parameters for macro 'MACROFUNC_INNER'.

  • Is it possible to get MSVC do the expansion with some tricks (another layer of macro to force a second expansion, some well placed ## or #, ...). Admitting that changing the way the construct work is not an option. (i.e.: can I solve the problem myself?)
  • What does the C standard say about such corner case? I couldn't find in the C11 norm anything that explicitly tells how to handle arguments that contains a list of arguments. (i.e.: can I argue with the author of the code that he has to write it again, or is just MVSC non-conform?)
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  • 1
    MSVC does not conform to C99 or C11. MS has never demonstrated much regard for standards-conformance in general, nor for detailed conformance with language standards in particular. – John Bollinger Feb 4 '16 at 20:18
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    I am probably off topic with an opinion. But using macros that invent a language on top of C is terrible, to be used only as a last resort when there is no other way. How hard is it to add three values? – Weather Vane Feb 4 '16 at 20:37
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    @WeatherVane That's a general problem. On the one hand, everyone wants MCVEs. But on the other hand, this may cripple the view on the real intent of the author, making the construct seemingly useless. – Ctx Feb 4 '16 at 20:45
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MSVC is non-conformant. The standard is actually clear on the point, although it does not feel the need to mention this particular case, which is not exceptional.

When a function-like macro invocation is encountered, the preprocessor:

  1. §6.10.3/11 identifies the arguments, which are possibly empty sequences of tokens separated by non-protected commas , (a comma is protected if it is inside parentheses ()).

  2. §6.10.3.1/1 does a first pass over the macro body, substituting each parameter which is not used in a # or ## operation with the corresponding fully macro-expanded argument. (It does no other substitutions in the macro body in this step.)

  3. §6.10.3.4/1 rescans the substituted replacement token sequence, performing more macro replacements as necessary.

(The above mostly ignores stringification (#) and token concatenation (##), which are not relevant to this question.)

This order of operations unambiguously leads to the behaviour expected by whoever wrote the software.

Apparently (according to @dxiv, and verified here) the following standards-compliant workaround works on some versions of MS Visual Studio:

#define CALL(A,B) A B
#define OUTER(PARAM) CALL(INNER,(PARAM))
#define INNER(A,B,C) whatever

For reference, the actual language from the C11 standard, skipping over the references to # and ## handling:

§6.10.3 11 The sequence of preprocessing tokens bounded by the outside-most matching parentheses forms the list of arguments for the function-like macro. The individual arguments within the list are separated by comma preprocessing tokens, but comma preprocessing tokens between matching inner parentheses do not separate arguments.…

§6.10.3.1 1 After the arguments for the invocation of a function-like macro have been identified, argument substitution takes place. A parameter in the replacement list… is replaced by the corresponding argument after all macros contained therein have been expanded. Before being substituted, each argument’s preprocessing tokens are completely macro replaced as if they formed the rest of the preprocessing file…

§6.10.3.4 1 After all parameters in the replacement list have been substituted… [t]he resulting preprocessing token sequence is then rescanned, along with all subsequent preprocessing tokens of the source file, for more macro names to replace.

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  • Unsurprisingly, the tentative MSVC workaround fails. – dxiv Feb 4 '16 at 22:58
  • @dxiv: here's another low probability attempt: #define CALL(X,Y) X Y #define OUTER(PARAM) CALL(INNER, (PARAM))` – rici Feb 4 '16 at 23:02
  • Nice. This one does in fact work. Could you comment on whether it's any more (or less) standard than the construct I posted in my answer? – dxiv Feb 4 '16 at 23:09
  • @dxiv: This one (now edited into the answer) is compliant and should work anywhere. I think john bollinger is right about yours; my telephone doesn't come with gcc so I can't test until I get home. – rici Feb 4 '16 at 23:40
  • Thanks for your answers everyone, I'll try that tomorrow. About the rescan, actually it doesn't talk about text but the sequence of tokens. In that sense, I figured it could be interpreted as the parameter is still just one single token and that's why it would not be understood as several arguments. That's why I wasn't sure. But I guess the replacement list is itself regarded as a list of tokens by definition, so this would be equivalent. – Cilyan Feb 5 '16 at 0:35
3

C11 says that each appearance of an object-like macro's name

[is] replaced by the replacement list of preprocessing tokens that constitute the remainder of the directive. The replacement list is then rescanned for more macro names as specified below.

[6.10.3/9]

Of function-like macros it says this:

If the identifier-list in the macro definition does not end with an ellipsis, the number of arguments [...] in an invocation of a function-like macro shall equal the number of parameters in the macro definition.

[6.10.3/4]

and this:

The sequence of preprocessing tokens bounded by the outside-most matching parentheses forms the list of arguments for the function-like macro.

[6.10.3/11]

and this:

After the arguments for the invocation of a function-like macro have been identified, argument substitution takes place. A parameter in the replacement list [...] is replaced by the corresponding argument after all macros contained therein have been expanded. Before being substituted, each argument’s preprocessing tokens are completely macro replaced as if they formed the rest of the preprocessing file; no other preprocessing tokens are available.

[6.10.3.1/1]

Of macros in general it also says this:

After all parameters in the replacement list have been substituted [... t]he resulting preprocessing token sequence is then rescanned, along with all subsequent preprocessing tokens of the source file, for more macro names to replace.

[6.10.3.4/1]

MSVC++ does not properly expand the arguments to function-like macros before rescanning the expansion of such macros. It seems unlikely that there is any easy workaround.

UPDATE:

In light of @dxiv's answer, however, it may be that there is a solution after all. The problem with his solution with respect to standard-conforming behavior is that there needs to be one more expansion than is actually performed. That can easily enough be supplied. This variation on his approach works with GCC, as it should, and inasmuch as it is based on code that dxiv claims works with MSVC++, it seems likely to work there, too:

#define EXPAND(x) x
#define PAREN(...) (__VA_ARGS__)
#define EXPAND_F(m, ...) EXPAND(m PAREN(__VA_ARGS__))
#define SUM3(a,b,c) a + b + c
#define ARGS 1,2,3

int sum = EXPAND_F(SUM3, ARGS);

I have of course made it a little more generic than perhaps it needs to be, but that may serve you well if you have a lot of these to deal with..

0

Curiuosly enough, the following appears to work in MSVC (tested with 2010 and 2015).

#define ARGS 1,2,3

#define OUTER(...) INNER PARAN(__VA_ARGS__)
#define PARAN(...) (__VA_ARGS__)
#define INNER(A,B,C) A + B + C

int a = OUTER(ARGS);

I don't know that it's supposed to work by the letter of the standard, in fact I have a hunch it's not. Could still be conditionally compiled just for MSVC, as a workaround.


[EDIT]  P.S.  As pointed out in the comments, the above is (another) non-standard MSVC behavior. Instead, the alternative workarounds posted by @rici and @JohnBollinger in the respective replies are compliant, thus recommended.
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  • It doesn't work in GCC 4, and I don't think it should. When OUTER(ARGS) is expanded, it should yield INNER PARAN(1,2,3). When that is re-scanned, the token INNER is not immediately followed by an open parenthesis, so it is not recognized as a function-like macro. The PARAN(1,2,3) is expanded to (1,2,3), but too late to do any good. – John Bollinger Feb 4 '16 at 23:23
  • @JohnBollinger the token INNER is not immediately followed by an open parenthesis. That's one point I am not clear on. I can't find a requirement for "followed immediately". On a quick search [6.10.3/10] defines an invocation of a function-like macro as a "subsequent instance of the function-like macro name followed by a ( as the next preprocessing token" which would appear to allow whitespace between the macro name and the parentheses. – dxiv Feb 4 '16 at 23:35
  • the problem is not whitespace or no whitespace. It is that at the time the expansion of OUTER() is re-scanned, the next token after INNER is (should be) PARAN. That is why it is not recognized as the invocation of a function-like macro. – John Bollinger Feb 4 '16 at 23:39
  • @dxiv whitespace is fine. But there is only one rescan, so the substitution of PARAN won't trigger the expansion of INNER – rici Feb 4 '16 at 23:43
  • That's where it gets fuzzy. My alternative reading: when OUTER is expanded, INNER is not followed by a ( so it is treated like a regular text token. Then PARAN is expanded following the function-macro rules, so at this point the expansion is INNER (1,2,3). Finally, this is rescanned, at which point INNER is recognized as a function-macro and expanded, resulting in 1+2+3. – dxiv Feb 4 '16 at 23:45

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