70

I'm writing a Greasemonkey script for a site which at some point modifies location.href.

How can I get an event (via window.addEventListener or something similar) when window.location.href changes on a page? I also need access to the DOM of the document pointing to the new/modified url.

I've seen other solutions which involve timeouts and polling, but I'd like to avoid that if possible.

71

popstate event:

The popstate event is fired when the active history entry changes. [...] The popstate event is only triggered by doing a browser action such as a click on the back button (or calling history.back() in JavaScript)

So, listening to popstate event and sending a popstate event when using history.pushState() should be enough to take action on href change:

window.addEventListener('popstate', listener);

const pushUrl = (href) => {
  history.pushState({}, '', href);
  window.dispatchEvent(new Event('popstate'));
};
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  • 1
    But will the popstate fire before the content is loaded? – user2782001 Mar 23 '17 at 21:29
  • 2
    unusable if don't have any control over the piece of code that pushState – Nathan Gouy Feb 5 at 17:22
36
+50

I use this script in my extension "Grab Any Media" and work fine ( like youtube case )

var oldHref = document.location.href;

window.onload = function() {

    var
         bodyList = document.querySelector("body")

        ,observer = new MutationObserver(function(mutations) {

            mutations.forEach(function(mutation) {

                if (oldHref != document.location.href) {

                    oldHref = document.location.href;

                    /* Changed ! your code here */

                }

            });

        });

    var config = {
        childList: true,
        subtree: true
    };

    observer.observe(bodyList, config);

};
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  • Somehow, I like this approach... feels a little RxJs-ish :) – Guntram Mar 28 '18 at 13:31
  • The only solution that could have worked for youtube: [Report Only] Refused to create a worker from 'youtube.com/sw.js' because it violates the following Content Security Policy directive: "worker-src 'none'". – Simon Meusel Apr 22 '18 at 14:15
  • MutationObserver – xgqfrms-gildata Aug 22 '19 at 5:43
  • Worked out of the box with no trouble for my use case, God bless! It's annoying there's no native event for this yet (popstate did not work for me) but one day! I would use window.addEventListener("load", () => {}) instead of window.onload though :) – Sanchit Batra Mar 9 at 9:46
  • this works, detects history.pushState even in extension context – YangombiUmpakati Mar 12 at 12:45
23

You can't avoid polling, there isn't any event for href change.

Using intervals is quite light anyways if you don't go overboard. Checking the href every 50ms or so will not have any significant effect on performance if you're worried about that.

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  • 2
    @AlexanderMills: fortunately there are these new solutions of popstate and hashchange. – serv-inc Apr 24 '17 at 20:07
  • This is not true. – inf3rno Aug 18 '18 at 12:42
  • @MartinZvarík Even in 2010 it was possible to use the unload event plus a micro or macro task to get the new document loaded. – inf3rno Oct 17 '18 at 2:06
11

There is a default onhashchange event that you can use.

Documented HERE

And can be used like this:

function locationHashChanged( e ) {
    console.log( location.hash );
    console.log( e.oldURL, e.newURL );
    if ( location.hash === "#pageX" ) {
        pageX();
    }
}

window.onhashchange = locationHashChanged;

If the browser doesn't support oldURL and newURL you can bind it like this:

//let this snippet run before your hashChange event binding code
if( !window.HashChangeEvent )( function() {
    let lastURL = document.URL;
    window.addEventListener( "hashchange", function( event ) {
        Object.defineProperty( event, "oldURL", { enumerable: true, configurable: true, value: lastURL } );
        Object.defineProperty( event, "newURL", { enumerable: true, configurable: true, value: document.URL } );
        lastURL = document.URL;
    } );
} () );
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  • 6
    Hashchange events are only sent if your URL has a part starting with a '#' symbol, normally used for anchor links. Otherwise it won't fire. – Fredrik_Macrobond Dec 5 '18 at 9:04
  • window.addEventListener("hashchange", funcRef, false); – Bishoy Hanna Mar 9 at 9:45
7

Have you tried beforeUnload? This event fires immediately before the page responds to a navigation request, and this should include the modification of the href.

    <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2 Final//EN">
    <HTML>
    <HEAD>
    <TITLE></TITLE>
    <META NAME="Generator" CONTENT="TextPad 4.6">
    <META NAME="Author" CONTENT="?">
    <META NAME="Keywords" CONTENT="?">
    <META NAME="Description" CONTENT="?">
    </HEAD>

         <script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.3/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
            <script type="text/javascript">
            $(document).ready(function(){
                $(window).unload(
                        function(event) {
                            alert("navigating");
                        }
                );
                $("#theButton").click(
                    function(event){
                        alert("Starting navigation");
                        window.location.href = "http://www.bbc.co.uk";
                    }
                );

            });
            </script>


    <BODY BGCOLOR="#FFFFFF" TEXT="#000000" LINK="#FF0000" VLINK="#800000" ALINK="#FF00FF" BACKGROUND="?">

        <button id="theButton">Click to navigate</button>

        <a href="http://www.google.co.uk"> Google</a>
    </BODY>
    </HTML>

Beware, however, that your event will fire whenever you navigate away from the page, whether this is because of the script, or somebody clicking on a link. Your real challenge, is detecting the different reasons for the event being fired. (If this is important to your logic)

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  • I'm not sure if this will work because often the hash changes do no involve a page reload. – samandmoore Aug 19 '10 at 13:32
  • I need access to the new DOM as well, I updated the question to clarify that. – Johan Dahlin Aug 19 '10 at 13:33
  • OK - didn't consider the hash situation - will think about that one. As for being able to access the new DOM, then you are out of luck (as far as accesssing this from an event handler is concerned) as the event will fire before the new DOM has been loaded. You might be able to incorporate the logic into the onload event of the new page, but you may have the same issues with respect to identifying whether you need to carry out the logic for every load of that page. Can you provide some more details about what you are trying to achieve, including page flow? – belugabob Aug 19 '10 at 13:38
  • I just tried accessing the location.href inside the onbeforeunload event handler, and it shows the original url, not the target url. – CMCDragonkai Feb 24 '17 at 11:42
  • Beforeunload can cancel the unloading of the page, so the unload event is better, if you don't want to cancel navigation. – inf3rno Aug 18 '18 at 12:44
4

Through Jquery, just try

$(window).on('beforeunload', function () {
    //your code goes here on location change 
});

By using javascript:

window.addEventListener("beforeunload", function (event) {
   //your code goes here on location change 
});

Refer Document : https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/Events/beforeunload

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1

Well there is 2 ways to change the location.href. Either you can write location.href = "y.html", which reloads the page or can use the history API which does not reload the page. I experimented with the first a lot recently.

If you open a child window and capture the load of the child page from the parent window, then different browsers behave very differently. The only thing that is common, that they remove the old document and add a new one, so for example adding readystatechange or load event handlers to the old document does not have any effect. Most of the browsers remove the event handlers from the window object too, the only exception is Firefox. In Chrome with Karma runner and in Firefox you can capture the new document in the loading readyState if you use unload + next tick. So you can add for example a load event handler or a readystatechange event handler or just log that the browser is loading a page with a new URI. In Chrome with manual testing (probably GreaseMonkey too) and in Opera, PhantomJS, IE10, IE11 you cannot capture the new document in the loading state. In those browsers the unload + next tick calls the callback a few hundred msecs later than the load event of the page fires. The delay is typically 100 to 300 msecs, but opera simetime makes a 750 msec delay for next tick, which is scary. So if you want a consistent result in all browsers, then you do what you want to after the load event, but there is no guarantee the location won't be overridden before that.

var uuid = "win." + Math.random();
var timeOrigin = new Date();
var win = window.open("about:blank", uuid, "menubar=yes,location=yes,resizable=yes,scrollbars=yes,status=yes");


var callBacks = [];
var uglyHax = function (){
    var done = function (){
        uglyHax();
        callBacks.forEach(function (cb){
            cb();
        });
    };
    win.addEventListener("unload", function unloadListener(){
        win.removeEventListener("unload", unloadListener); // Firefox remembers, other browsers don't
        setTimeout(function (){
            // IE10, IE11, Opera, PhantomJS, Chrome has a complete new document at this point
            // Chrome on Karma, Firefox has a loading new document at this point
            win.document.readyState; // IE10 and IE11 sometimes fails if I don't access it twice, idk. how or why
            if (win.document.readyState === "complete")
                done();
            else
                win.addEventListener("load", function (){
                    setTimeout(done, 0);
                });
        }, 0);
    });
};
uglyHax();


callBacks.push(function (){
    console.log("cb", win.location.href, win.document.readyState);
    if (win.location.href !== "http://localhost:4444/y.html")
        win.location.href = "http://localhost:4444/y.html";
    else
        console.log("done");
});
win.location.href = "http://localhost:4444/x.html";

If you run your script only in Firefox, then you can use a simplified version and capture the document in a loading state, so for example a script on the loaded page cannot navigate away before you log the URI change:

var uuid = "win." + Math.random();
var timeOrigin = new Date();
var win = window.open("about:blank", uuid, "menubar=yes,location=yes,resizable=yes,scrollbars=yes,status=yes");


var callBacks = [];
win.addEventListener("unload", function unloadListener(){
    setTimeout(function (){
        callBacks.forEach(function (cb){
            cb();
        });
    }, 0);
});


callBacks.push(function (){
    console.log("cb", win.location.href, win.document.readyState);
    // be aware that the page is in loading readyState, 
    // so if you rewrite the location here, the actual page will be never loaded, just the new one
    if (win.location.href !== "http://localhost:4444/y.html")
        win.location.href = "http://localhost:4444/y.html";
    else
        console.log("done");
});
win.location.href = "http://localhost:4444/x.html";

If we are talking about single page applications which change the hash part of the URI, or use the history API, then you can use the hashchange and the popstate events of the window respectively. Those can capture even if you move in history back and forward until you stay on the same page. The document does not changes by those and the page is not really reloaded.

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