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I have a form where password is being encrypted on the client side and sent as 'post' once login is clicked. However, I am unable to prevent the password input to stretch to random string at the time login is clicked. I want encryption to happen behind the scenes. Basically, what I mean is that when i type password and click login , the password size increases as it now depicts the encrypted password and the form submits.

Here is my form part:-

<form action="/scripts/loginsql.php" method="post" id="user_login" onsubmit="submitLogin()" >
        <label for="textfield"></label>
        <input name="username" type="text" class="textfieldstyle" id="username" placeholder="Username" >
        <br>
        <br>
        <br>
        <input name="password" type="password" class="textfieldstyle" id="password" placeholder="Password" >
        <input name="Sign In" type="image" src="/images/signin.png" class="textfieldstyle" id="submit" />
        <?php
        $ipADDR = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
        $salt = exec("/opt/bin/createLoginSalt " . $ipADDR);
        echo '<input id="salt" value="' . $salt . '" readonly="readonly"  type="hidden">';
        ?>
    </form>

Here is the js part:-

function submitLogin(){
            var sltElement    = document.getElementById("user_login").elements.namedItem("salt");
            var userElement   = document.getElementById("user_login").elements.namedItem("username");
            var passwdElement = document.getElementById("user_login").elements.namedItem("password");
            var passHash = Aes.Ctr.encrypt(passwdElement.value, sltElement.value, 256);
            passwdElement.value = passHash;
            sltElement.value    = " ";
            passwdElement.form.submit();
        }

Here is the php part:-

$error='';

    if(!isset($_POST['username']) || !isset($_POST['password'])){
        $error = "Username or Password is invalid";
    }
    else
    {
        $username=$_POST['username'];
        $stringEncrypted=$_POST['password'];
        $ipADDR = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
        $username = stripslashes($username);
        $stringEncrypted = stripslashes($stringEncrypted); 
    $encryptionKey = exec("/opt/bin/getLoginSaltForSession " . $ipADDR);
    $password = AesCtr::decrypt($stringEncrypted, $encryptionKey, 256);

    $result = exec("/opt/bin/chkLignCrdntls " . $username . " " . $password . " " . $ipADDR);

    if ($result == 'false') {
            header("location: /scripts/login.php"); // Redirecting To Other Page
      exit();
        } else {
            header("location: /protected/main.html?tokn=" . $result); // Redirecting To Other Page
      $result = exec("/opt/bin/deleteLoginSalt " . $encryptionKey . " " . $ipADDR);

      exit();
        }
  • 1
    Put the encrypted password in a hidden input instead of the original password field. – Barmar Feb 5 '16 at 22:50
  • @Barmar : ok give me few mins let me try that – Rajat Bansal Feb 5 '16 at 22:51
  • 1
    What's the point of encrypting before submitting? As long as you're using SSL to submit the form, the password will be encrypted on the wire. – Barmar Feb 5 '16 at 22:51
  • @Barmar : customer requirement :( – Rajat Bansal Feb 5 '16 at 22:52
  • @Barmar: but if you see even if i put it in the hidden input how will i relate my password form field to that hidden one? could you show me a code snippet or that change in my code. Its not clear to me how to do that exactly. – Rajat Bansal Feb 5 '16 at 22:54
1

Make the password field that's sent to the server a hidden field in the form.

<form action="/scripts/loginsql.php" method="post" id="user_login" onsubmit="submitLogin()" >
        <label for="textfield"></label>
        <input name="username" type="text" class="textfieldstyle" id="username" placeholder="Username" >
        <br>
        <br>
        <br>
        <input type="password" class="textfieldstyle" id="password" placeholder="Password" >
        <input name="password" type="hidden" id="hiddenpassword">
        <input name="Sign In" type="image" src="/images/signin.png" class="textfieldstyle" id="submit" />
        <?php
        $ipADDR = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
        $salt = exec("/opt/bin/createLoginSalt " . $ipADDR);
        echo '<input id="salt" value="' . $salt . '" readonly="readonly"  type="hidden">';
        ?>
</form>

The JS would then take the password from the visible field and encrypt it into the hidden field.

function submitLogin(){
    var sltElement    = document.getElementById("user_login").elements.namedItem("salt");
    var userElement   = document.getElementById("user_login").elements.namedItem("username");
    var passwdElement = document.getElementById("password");
    var hiddenPasswdElement = document.getElementById("hiddenpassword");
    var passHash = Aes.Ctr.encrypt(passwdElement.value, sltElement.value, 256);
    hiddenPasswdElement.value = passHash;
    sltElement.value    = " ";
    passwdElement.form.submit();
}

The visible password element doesn't have a name attribute, so it won't be submitted with the form.

  • thanks a lot Barmar. This is the 2nd time your answer has saved me. Learnt something new. Thanks a lot – Rajat Bansal Feb 5 '16 at 23:07
  • another question so is the original password which is the part of the form also being sent over the network. i dont see it on developer tools though. – Rajat Bansal Feb 5 '16 at 23:27
  • Read the last line of my answer. – Barmar Feb 5 '16 at 23:28
  • oops sorry :) thanks a lot – Rajat Bansal Feb 5 '16 at 23:29
0

It's a better practice to do the hashing server-side. If you're trying to prevent a man in the middle attack between client and server you should implement HTTPS instead.

That said, if you really want to go this way use AJAX.

With jQuery

function submitLogin() {
    var sltElement = document.getElementById("user_login").elements.namedItem("salt");
    var userElement = document.getElementById("user_login").elements.namedItem("username");
    var passwdElement = document.getElementById("user_login").elements.namedItem("password");
    var passHash = Aes.Ctr.encrypt(passwdElement.value, sltElement.value, 256);
    sltElement.value = " ";

    var formData = {
        "username": userElement.value,
        "password":passHash
    }

    $.ajax({
        type: 'POST', 
        url: '/scripts/loginsql.php', 
        data: formData, 
        dataType: 'json', 
        encode: true
    })

}
0

You could simply send password from hidden input. Your code would be like this

   <form action="/scripts/loginsql.php" method="post" id="user_login" onsubmit="submitLogin()" >
            <label for="textfield"></label>
            <input name="username" type="text" class="textfieldstyle" id="username" placeholder="Username" >
            <br>
            <br>
            <br>
            <input type="password" class="textfieldstyle" placeholder="Password" id="password">
    <input type="hidden" name="password" class="textfieldstyle" placeholder="Password" id="hiddenPassword">
                <input name="Sign In" type="image" src="/images/signin.png" class="textfieldstyle" id="submit" />
            <?php
            $ipADDR = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
            $salt = exec("/opt/bin/createLoginSalt " . $ipADDR);
            echo '<input id="salt" value="' . $salt . '" readonly="readonly"  type="hidden">';
            ?>
        </form>

And JS

function submitLogin(){
            var sltElement    = document.getElementById("user_login").elements.namedItem("salt");
            var userElement   = document.getElementById("user_login").elements.namedItem("username");
            var passwd = document.getElementById("password").value;
            var hiddenPasswdElement = document.getElementById("user_login").elements.namedItem("hiddenPassword");
            var passHash = Aes.Ctr.encrypt(passwd, sltElement.value, 256);
            hiddenPasswdElement.value = passHash;
            sltElement.value    = " ";
            passwdElement.form.submit();
        }

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