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I want to have a class cX where x is a number between 0 and 100. I could add c0 to c100 to my css. But well, I'd like to avoid that.

I know there are ways to match element attributes like h2[rel="external"]. But is it also possible to match class names? Would it also possible to use the matched value within the rule?

Example

.c[x] { height: x%; }
  • What should happen if say there is an element with class c101? – Harry Feb 6 '16 at 7:03
  • @Harry ideally the rule would ignore it. But I could live without the restriction – boop Feb 6 '16 at 7:04
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    Why not use SASS to generate all the rules you want? – Aziz Feb 6 '16 at 7:10
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    the 100 CSS rules would generate a 2kb file, very very small and could be 1kb GZIPPED – Aziz Feb 6 '16 at 7:20
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    @Brettetete: I've reopened it but as I said earlier you can't reuse the value inside the ruleset. There is no other pure CSS solution for it. – Harry Feb 6 '16 at 7:20
4

EDIT - CSS attr

After a bit of research, I found that there is a CSS function called attr which is exactly what you are looking for, however, its support is currently limited to the CSS content property and not others, however, it is interesting to keep an eye on it, I reckon it will be the solution of the future

From Moz MDN:

The attr() CSS function is used to retrieve the value of an attribute of the selected element and use it in the style sheet. It can be used on pseudo-elements too and, in this case, the value of the attribute on the pseudo-element's originated element is returned.

Your code would probably look like this:

.c { height: attr(data-height %, 0); }

HTML

<div class="c" data-height="1"></div>
...

This will get the height from the element's data attribute and sets it with the % percentage unit and falls back to 0 if data-height is not found.


Current supported methods:

From the W3 Docs:

6.3.2. Substring matching attribute selectors

Three additional attribute selectors are provided for matching substrings in the value of an attribute:

[att^=val]

Represents an element with the att attribute whose value begins with the prefix "val". If "val" is the empty string then the selector does not represent anything.

[att$=val]

Represents an element with the att attribute whose value ends with the suffix "val". If "val" is the empty string then the selector does not represent anything.

[att*=val]

Represents an element with the att attribute whose value contains at least one instance of the substring "val". If "val" is the empty string then the selector does not represent anything. Attribute values must be CSS identifiers or strings. [CSS21] The case-sensitivity of attribute names in selectors depends on the document language.

As discussed in the comments, there is no pure CSS solution at the moment, you could try one of the following approaches:

SASS

@for $i from 1 through 100 {
    $height: percentage($i/100);
   .c#{$i} {height: $height;}
}

Output:

.c1 {height: 1%;}

.c2 {height: 2%;}

.c3 {height: 3%;}

...

LESS

.c-gen(@index) when (@index > 0){
  .c@{index}{
    height: @index * 1%;
  }
  .c-gen(@index - 1);
}
.c-gen(100);

LESS code by Harry


Server Side

You could make your server side script output inline CSS for each item

PHP Example:

<?php 
for ($i = 1; $i <= 100; $i++) {
    echo "<span height='".$i."%'>".$i."</span>";
} 
?>

Output

<span height="1%">1</span>
...

jQuery

var i = 0;
$('.c').each(function() {
  i++;
  $(this).attr('height', i + '%');
  //console.log(i); //debug
});
  • Here is a version using Less. Feel free to add it to your answer as I don't think there is much point in adding another one. – Harry Feb 6 '16 at 7:40
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    Sure, thanks! I updated the answer. – Aziz Feb 6 '16 at 7:43

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