I have the following ES6 modules:

network.js

export function getDataFromServer() {
  return ...
}

widget.js

import { getDataFromServer } from 'network.js';

export class Widget() {
  constructor() {
    getDataFromServer("dataForWidget")
    .then(data => this.render(data));
  }

  render() {
    ...
  }
}

I'm looking for a way to test Widget with a mock instance of getDataFromServer. If I used separate <script>s instead of ES6 modules, like in Karma, I could write my test like:

describe("widget", function() {
  it("should do stuff", function() {
    let getDataFromServer = spyOn(window, "getDataFromServer").andReturn("mockData")
    let widget = new Widget();
    expect(getDataFromServer).toHaveBeenCalledWith("dataForWidget");
    expect(otherStuff).toHaveHappened();
  });
});

However, if I'm testing ES6 modules individually outside of a browser (like with Mocha + babel), I would write something like:

import { Widget } from 'widget.js';

describe("widget", function() {
  it("should do stuff", function() {
    let getDataFromServer = spyOn(?????) // How to mock?
    .andReturn("mockData")
    let widget = new Widget();
    expect(getDataFromServer).toHaveBeenCalledWith("dataForWidget");
    expect(otherStuff).toHaveHappened();
  });
});

Okay, but now getDataFromServer is not available in window (well, there's no window at all), and I don't know a way to inject stuff directly into widget.js's own scope.

So where do I go from here?

  1. Is there a way to access the scope of widget.js, or at least replace its imports with my own code?
  2. If not, how can I make Widget testable?

Stuff I considered:

a. Manual dependency injection.

Remove all imports from widget.js and expect the caller to provide the deps.

export class Widget() {
  constructor(deps) {
    deps.getDataFromServer("dataForWidget")
    .then(data => this.render(data));
  }
}

I'm very uncomfortable with messing up Widget's public interface like this and exposing implementation details. No go.


b. Expose the imports to allow mocking them.

Something like:

import { getDataFromServer } from 'network.js';

export let deps = {
  getDataFromServer
};

export class Widget() {
  constructor() {
    deps.getDataFromServer("dataForWidget")
    .then(data => this.render(data));
  }
}

then:

import { Widget, deps } from 'widget.js';

describe("widget", function() {
  it("should do stuff", function() {
    let getDataFromServer = spyOn(deps.getDataFromServer)  // !
      .andReturn("mockData");
    let widget = new Widget();
    expect(getDataFromServer).toHaveBeenCalledWith("dataForWidget");
    expect(otherStuff).toHaveHappened();
  });
});

This is less invasive but requires me to write a lot of boilerplate for each module, and there's still a risk of me using getDataFromServer instead of deps.getDataFromServer all the time. I'm uneasy about it, but that's my best idea so far.

  • If there is no native mock support for this kind of import I would probably think over writing an own transformer for babel converting your ES6 style import to a custom mockable import system. This for sure would add another layer of possible failure and changes the code you want to test, ... . – t.niese Feb 6 '16 at 11:57
  • I can't set a test suite right now, but I'd try to use jasmin's createSpy (github.com/jasmine/jasmine/blob/…) function with an imported reference to getDataFromServer from 'network.js' module. So that, in the widget's tests file you'd import getDataFromServer, and then would let spy = createSpy('getDataFromServer', getDataFromServer) – Microfed Feb 6 '16 at 12:13
  • The second guess is to return an object from 'network.js' module, not a function. In that way, you could spyOn on that object, imported from network.js module. It's always a reference to the same object. – Microfed Feb 6 '16 at 12:15
  • Actually, it's already an object, from what I can see: babeljs.io/repl/… – Microfed Feb 6 '16 at 12:20
  • 2
    I don't really understand how dependency injection messes up Widget's public interface? Widget is messed up without deps. Why not make the dependency explicit? – thebearingedge Jul 23 '16 at 23:14

I've started employing the import * as obj style within my tests, which imports all exports from a module as properties of an object which can then be mocked. I find this to be a lot cleaner than using something like rewire or proxyquire or any similar technique. I've done this most often when needing to mock Redux actions, for example. Here's what I might use for your example above:

import * as network from 'network.js';

describe("widget", function() {
  it("should do stuff", function() {
    let getDataFromServer = spyOn(network, "getDataFromServer").andReturn("mockData")
    let widget = new Widget();
    expect(getDataFromServer).toHaveBeenCalledWith("dataForWidget");
    expect(otherStuff).toHaveHappened();
  });
});

If your function happens to be a default export, then import * as network from './network' would produce {default: getDataFromServer} and you can mock network.default.

  • 1
    Do you use the import * as obj only in the test or also in your regular code? – Chau Thai Sep 19 '16 at 9:31
  • 20
    @carpeliam This wont work with the ES6 module spec where the imports are readonly. – ashish Apr 18 '17 at 2:26
  • 4
    Jasmine is complaining [method_name] is not declared writable or has no setter which makes sense since es6 imports are constant. Is there a way to workaround? – lpan May 11 '17 at 18:11
  • 1
    @Francisc import (unlike require, which can go anywhere) gets hoisted, so you can’t technically import multiple times. Sounds like your spy is being called elsewhere? In order to keep the tests from messing up state (known as test pollution), you can reset your spies in an afterEach (e.g. sinon.sandbox). Jasmine I believe does this automatically. – carpeliam Nov 18 '17 at 14:33
  • 3
    @agent47 The problem is that while the ES6 spec specifically prevents this answer from working, in exactly the way you mentioned, most people who write import in their JS aren't really using ES6 modules. Something like webpack or babel will step in at build-time and convert it either into their own internal mechanism for calling distant parts of the code (eg __webpack_require__) or into one of the pre-ES6 de facto standards, CommonJS, AMD or UMD. And that conversion often doesn't adhere strictly to the spec. So for many, many devs just now, this answer works fine. For now. – daemonaka May 22 at 16:06

@carpeliam is correct but note that if you want to spy on a function in a module and use another function in that module calling that function, you need to call that function as part of the exports namespace otherwise the spy won't be used.

Wrong example:

// mymodule.js

export function myfunc2() {return 2;}
export function myfunc1() {return myfunc2();}

// tests.js
import * as mymodule

describe('tests', () => {
    beforeEach(() => {
        spyOn(mymodule, 'myfunc2').and.returnValue = 3;
    });

    it('calls myfunc2', () => {
        let out = mymodule.myfunc1();
        // out will still be 2
    });
});

Right example:

export function myfunc2() {return 2;}
export function myfunc1() {return exports.myfunc2();}

// tests.js
import * as mymodule

describe('tests', () => {
    beforeEach(() => {
        spyOn(mymodule, 'myfunc2').and.returnValue = 3;
    });

    it('calls myfunc2', () => {
        let out = mymodule.myfunc1();
        // out will be 3 which is what you expect
    });
});
  • 4
    I wish i could up vote this answer 20 more times! Thank you! – sfletche Apr 11 '17 at 23:23
  • Can someone explain why this is the case? Is exports.myfunc2() a copy of myfunc2() without being a direct reference? – Colin Whitmarsh Aug 17 '17 at 16:45
  • 2
    @ColinWhitmarsh exports.myfunc2 is a direct reference to myfunc2 until spyOn replaces it with a reference to a spy function. spyOn will change the value of exports.myfunc2 and replace it with a spy object, whereas myfunc2 remains untouched in the module's scope (because spyOn has no access to it) – madprog Nov 27 '17 at 10:17
  • shouldn't importing with * freeze the object and the object attributes cannot be changed ? – agent47 Mar 8 at 23:33
  • 1
    Just a note that this recommendation of using export function along with exports.myfunc2 is technically mixing commonjs and ES6 module syntax and this is not allowed in newer versions of webpack (2+) that require all-or-nothing ES6 module syntax usage. I added an answer below based on this one that will work in ES6 strict environments. – QuarkleMotion May 19 at 19:05

@vdloo's answer got me headed in the right direction, but using both commonjs "exports" and ES6 module "export" keywords together in the same file did not work for me (webpack v2 complains). Instead, I'm using a default (named variable) export wrapping all of the individual named module exports and then importing the default export in my tests file. I'm using the following export setup with mocha/sinon and stubbing works fine without needing rewire, etc.:

// MyModule.js
let MyModule;

export function myfunc2() { return 2; }
export function myfunc1() { return MyModule.myfunc2(); }

export default MyModule = {
  myfunc1,
  myfunc2
}

// tests.js
import MyModule from './MyModule'

describe('MyModule', () => {
  const sandbox = sinon.sandbox.create();
  beforeEach(() => {
    sandbox.stub(MyModule, 'myfunc2').returns(4);
  });
  afterEach(() => {
    sandbox.restore();
  });
  it('myfunc1 is a proxy for myfunc2', () => {
    expect(MyModule.myfunc1()).to.eql(4);
  });
});
  • Helpful answer, thanks. Just wanted to mention that the let MyModule isn't required to use the default export (it can be a raw object). Also, this method doesn't require myfunc1() to call myfunc2(), it works to just spy on it directly. – Mark Edington Aug 5 at 18:33

I implemented a library that attempts to solve the issue of run-time mocking of Typescript class imports without needing the original class to know about any explicit dependency injection.

The library uses the import * as syntax and then replaces the original exported object with a stub class. It retains type safety so your tests will break at compile time if a method name has been updated without updating the corresponding test.

This library can be found here: ts-mock-imports.

  • 1
    This module needs more github stars – S.D. Aug 31 at 12:32

I have found this syntax to be working:

My module:

// mymod.js
import shortid from 'shortid';

const myfunc = () => shortid();
export default myfunc;

My module's test code:

// mymod.test.js
import myfunc from './mymod';
import shortid from 'shortid';

jest.mock('shortid');

describe('mocks shortid', () => {
  it('works', () => {
    shortid.mockImplementation(() => 1);
    expect(myfunc()).toEqual(1);
  });
});

See the doc.

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