1

I have a self nested category model: which has_many and belongs_to it self

class Category < ActiveRecord::Base
    has_many    :subcategories,   class_name: "Category", foreign_key: "parent_id", dependent: :destroy
    belongs_to  :parent_category, class_name: "Category", foreign_key: "parent_id"
end

In the view I want to display not only the @category.subcategories.count but the count of all nested subcategories

how would I get that?

~~~ UPDATE: ~~~

In the categories controller I get the current category from the parameters like:

def show
    @category = Category.find(params[:id])
end

now I want use in the view (but the following example doesn't give me all nested subcategories back)

<div>
    <%= @category.name %> has <%= @category.subcategories.count %> subcategories in total
</div>
4

create a recursive model method...

def deep_count
  count = subcategories.count
  subcategories.each { |subcategory| count += subcategory.deep_count }
  count
end

If in your design it's possible for a child to be the parent of an ancestor

(e.g. "4x4" -> "Jeep" - > "SUV" -> "4x4" -> ...)

Then you could end up with a stack overflow. To avoid that you can track categories to ensure you don't deep_count them twice...

def deep_count(seen_ids=[])
  seen_ids << id
  count = subcategories.count
  subcategories.where("id NOT IN (?)", seen_ids).each do |subcategory|
    count += subcategory.deep_count(seen_ids)
  end
  count
end
| improve this answer | |
  • would that method sit in the model?? – xpnimi Feb 7 '16 at 0:39
  • 1
    awesome works great!!!! So the line in the view is like that: <%= @category.name %> has <%= @category.deep_count %> subcategories in total Thanks a lot!! – xpnimi Feb 7 '16 at 0:54
  • 1
    Would this ever lead to infinite recursion? – Richard Peck Feb 7 '16 at 11:49
  • 1
    @RichPeck only if a descendant is a parent of self or an ancestor, but good point. I've edited to handle that possibility. – SteveTurczyn Feb 7 '16 at 15:33
0

As an addition to @SteveTurczyn's epic answer, you may wish to look at using one of the hierarchy gems (we use acts_as_tree).

Not only will this extract your has_many :subcategories association, but provides a myriad of functionality to allow you to better handle nested objects.

#app/models/category.rb
class Category < ActiveRecord::Base
   acts_as_tree order: "name"
end

This will allow you to use the following:

@category = Category.find x

@category.children           #-> collection of subcategories
@category.parent             #-> Category record for "parent"

@category.children.create name: "Test" #-> creates new subcategory called "test"

Because acts_as_tree uses parent_id, you wouldn't have to change anything in your database.

--

You'd still be able to use the deep_count method:

#app/models/category.rb
class Category < ActiveRecord::Base
  acts_as_tree order: "name"

  def deep_count
     count = children.count
     children.each {|child| count += child.deep_count }
     count
  end
end

I'm sure there must be a way to count the "children" but I've not got any code at hand for it.


The main benefit of it is the recursion with displaying your categories. For example, if a Post has_many :categories:

#app/views/posts/index.html.erb
<%= render @post.categories %>

#app/views/categories/_category.html.erb
<%= category.name %>

Subcategories:
<%= render category.children if category.children.any? %>

--

Just seems a lot cleaner than two ActiveRecord associations.

| improve this answer | |
  • thanks for the hint, will look into it in the future. well described, thanks! – xpnimi Feb 7 '16 at 12:36

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