3

I'm doing some debugging and need to ensure instances of my class have a specific type, e.g. <type 'list'>, when type() is called.

The other option is redefining type() so it returns a different value when instances of my class are passed to it.

For example:

class Test:
    def __str__(self):
        return 'anything'

allows me to set my own value when the instance is treated as a string e.g. str(Test()). I want something similar for type(Test()):

class Test:
    def __type__(self):
        return type([])

(not valid)

4
  • 1
    You can't. Are you sure you need to match that type, a subclass won't do? Commented Feb 7, 2016 at 13:32
  • 7
    In other words, please tell us about the reason why you think you need this, this sounds a lot like an X-Y problem. Commented Feb 7, 2016 at 13:33
  • 1
    I'm debugging code that uses type(), which I need to "fool", so I can use my own objects instead of list. Also I want to know for theoretical reasons and understanding.
    – Qgenerator
    Commented Feb 7, 2016 at 17:33
  • 1
    If the code explicitly expects <list>, you may be stuck: the original code should have been duck-typed.
    – theodox
    Commented Feb 7, 2016 at 17:49

3 Answers 3

3

One way to achieve this is to use meta classes and define types. Here's a simple example of how you can do that.

Meta class definition and inheritance

# Meta class
class TypeClass(type):
        def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
                return super(TypeClass, cls).__new__(cls, *args, **kwargs)

        def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
                super(TypeClass, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)


# Class directly inheriting from the meta class.
class ObjectClass(metaclass=TypeClass):
        pass


# Class that has indirectly inherited from the meta class.
class TestClass(ObjectClass):
        pass

Tests

Let's test our TypeClass:

test = TypeClass
print("mro: {} \ntype: {} \nrepr: {}".format(
          test.__mro__,
          type(test),
          repr(test)
      ))

mro: (<class '__main__.TypeClass'>, <class 'type'>, <class 'object'>) 
type: <class 'type'> 
repr: <class '__main__.TypeClass'>

Now let's test our ObjectClass:

test = ObjectClass
print("mro: {} \ntype: {} \nrepr: {}".format(
          test.__mro__,
          type(test),
          repr(test)
     ))

Displays:

mro: (<class '__main__.ObjectClass'>, <class 'object'>) 
type: <class '__main__.TypeClass'> 
repr: <class '__main__.ObjectClass'>

Finally, let's test our TestClass:

test = TestClass

print("mro: {} \ntype: {} \nrepr: {}".format(
          test.__mro__, 
          type(test), 
          repr(test)
      ))

Displays:

mro: (<class '__main__.TestClass'>, <class '__main__.ObjectClass'>, <class 'object'>) 
type: <class '__main__.TypeClass'> 
repr: <class '__main__.TestClass'>

Answer to the question

So, here is an answer to your question. Although, it would be useful if you say why you're doing this. Perhaps there is a better way for implementing what you're trying to achieve here!

class TypeClass(list):
        def __new__(cls, args):
                return super(TypeClass, cls).__new__(cls, args)

        def __init__(self, args):
                super(TypeClass, self).__init__(args)


# class ObjectClass(metaclass=TypeClass):
#         pass


class TestClass(TypeClass):
        pass


test = TestClass
print("mro: {} \ntype: {} \nrepr: {}".format(
        test.__mro__,
        type(test),
        repr(test)
      ))


tests = {
        'test1': isinstance(TestClass, type(list)),
        'test2': isinstance(TestClass, list),
        'test3': type(TestClass) is type(list),
        'test4': type(TestClass) is list,
        'test5': type(TestClass) is type([]),
        'test6': type(TestClass) == type(list),
        'test7': type(TestClass) == type([]),
        'test8': type(TestClass) == type(type([]))
}

print('\n', *[item for item in tests.items()])

Which displays:

mro: (<class '__main__.TestClass'>, <class '__main__.TypeClass'>, <class 'list'>, <class 'object'>) 
type: <class 'type'> 
repr: <class '__main__.TestClass'>

('test3', True) ('test6', True) ('test4', False) ('test7', False) ('test5', False) ('test2', False) ('test1', True) ('test8', True)
3
  • How would I use this to make type(instance) == type([])?
    – Qgenerator
    Commented Feb 7, 2016 at 17:34
  • I'll add it to the bottom of my answer.
    – Pouria
    Commented Feb 7, 2016 at 17:45
  • There you go! I added it to the existing answer! But seriously, tell me what it is you wanna do. There might be a better way as this is very awkward. Frankly, I have been programming for 15 years and this is the first time I see the need for such an implementation, especially of an existing type!
    – Pouria
    Commented Feb 7, 2016 at 18:16
0

You can but I do not recommend doing it:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.__class__.__name__ = 'B'

print type(A())  # <class 'B'>
print type(A()) == B  # False, since it's actually not a type B
print type(A()).__name__ == 'B'  # True, since the name is 'B'

If you change the type completely instead of the name the type of the object will actually change.

class B(object):
    def x(self):
        return 'b'

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.__class__ = B
    def x(self):
        return 'a'

print A().x()  # b

Edit: to answer the other part of your question: if you want to override type you can do it like this:

class A(object):
    pass

def x(x):
    return 'test'

__builtins__.type = x

print type(A())  # test
7
  • This does not really affect the type programmatically. It changes what is printed, but if you do print type(A()) == B it will print False.
    – zondo
    Commented Feb 7, 2016 at 13:49
  • I thought that's what he wanted? I might have misunderstood.
    – olofom
    Commented Feb 7, 2016 at 13:54
  • He said, "need to ensure instances of my class have a specific type, e.g. <type 'list'>". In your case, they don't really. (They really have a type with the name <type '__main__.list'>.) Your answer is probably the closest that can be gotten to the asked-for answer, but I don't think it quite qualifies.
    – zondo
    Commented Feb 7, 2016 at 13:59
  • He could still use it like this type(A()).__name__ == 'B' # True depending on what he wants it for... but you're probably right that it won't solve it for him...
    – olofom
    Commented Feb 7, 2016 at 14:06
  • That is true. I'll grant you that.
    – zondo
    Commented Feb 7, 2016 at 14:07
0

My impression is you are trying to do the wrong thing, probably because your previous experience was with a static typed language.

In python you should never check the types, you should check the behaviour instead.

Probably you need something like:

import collections

if isinstance(theElement, collections.Iterable):
    # iterable
else:
    # not iterable
4
  • That's still type-checking; you're just checking if theElement is an instance of a different (virtual) superclass.
    – chepner
    Commented Feb 7, 2016 at 17:16
  • 1
    I'm debugging code that uses type(), which I need to "fool".
    – Qgenerator
    Commented Feb 7, 2016 at 17:31
  • @Qgenerator is this code in a library that you cannot fix? The open-source python libraries are quite open to receive pull requests. I have some doubts that you could be able to fool the type() because that's quite low level, and if you manage to do it, you will end-up breaking your other-class, as it will start to believe is something else.
    – sorin
    Commented Feb 7, 2016 at 17:34
  • It's for debugging purposes, I won't actually keep the ugly code.
    – Qgenerator
    Commented Feb 7, 2016 at 17:35

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