2

Here's a scenario which simulates running an older version of a Python program against a shelve database written by a newer version. Ideally, the User object would still be parsed and read in; the favouritePet attribute would be ignored. Understandably, it throws an error complaining that the tuple doesn't match.

Is there a good way of making this scenario work with namedtuples, or better to switch to storing a dictionary or class if this sort of flexibility is required?

import shelve
from collections import namedtuple

shelf = shelve.open("objectshelf", flag='n')

User = namedtuple("User", ("username", "password", "firstname", "surname", "favouritePet"))
shelf["namedtupleAndrew"] = User("andrew@example.com", "mypassword", "Andrew", "Smith", "cat")

# Redefine User to simulate a previous version of the User object that didn't record favouritePet;
# someone using an old version of the program against a database written to by a new version
User = namedtuple("User", ("username", "password", "firstname", "surname"))
# Throws error "takes 5 positional arguments but 6 were given"
namedTupleRead = shelf["namedtupleAndrew"]

print(namedTupleRead.username)

Edit: For completeness here's the same idea using a class:

import shelve

shelf = shelve.open("objectshelf", flag='n')

class User:

    def __init__(self, username, password, firstname, surname, favouritePet):
        self.username = username
        self.password = password
        self.firstname = firstname
        self.surname = surname
        self.favouritePet = favouritePet

shelf["objectAndrew"] = User("andrew@example.com", "mypassword", "Andrew", "Smith", "cat")

# Redefine User to simulate a previous version of the User object that didn't record favouritePet;
# someone using an old version of the program against a database written to by a new version
class User:

    def __init__(self, username, password, firstname, surname):
        self.username = username
        self.password = password
        self.firstname = firstname
        self.surname = surname

objectRead = shelf["objectAndrew"]

print(objectRead.username)
# favouritePet is still there; it's just a dictionary, after all.
print(objectRead.favouritePet)
  • With the class example, is there a good way to get rid of the self.username = username lines while still allowing the parameters to be listed in init ? – David B Feb 11 '16 at 11:51
2

I would advise to use a dict or custom class.

A named tuple needs exactly as many arguments as it has fields, so to make this work with a named tuple directly yout'd have to change the class' __new__ method to use *args and **kwargs instead of a fixed list of arguments. If you have a look at the definition of your User class (by adding the verbose=True argument), you'll see how the class is defined:

...
class User(tuple):
    'User(username, password, firstname, surname, favouritePet)'

    __slots__ = ()

    _fields = ('username', 'password', 'firstname', 'surname', 'favouritePet')

    def __new__(_cls, username, password, firstname, surname, favouritePet):
        'Create new instance of User(username, password, firstname, surname, favouritePet)'
        return _tuple.__new__(_cls, (username, password, firstname, surname, favouritePet))
...

__new__ would have to become __new__(_cls, *args, **kwargs), and then correctly parse args and kwargs (you'll still want to be able to use User('a', 'b', 'c', ...) as well as User('a', password='b', firstname='c', ...) but not User('a', username='A', ...) to remain consistent with namedtuple), and then use the resulting sequence with tuple.__new__. It's probably better to use a dedicated class instead of modifying the behaviour of a namedtuple in such a way.

It would be easier to change the way the User namedtuple is pickled by using the __reduce__ protocol (or copyreg.pickle()) by using a custom constructor function, e.g:

from collections import namedtuple
import shelve
import copyreg

shelf = shelve.open("test")

User = namedtuple("User", ("username", "password", "firstname", "surname", "favouritePet"))

User.__reduce__ = lambda user: (construct_user, tuple(user))
# or: copyreg.pickle(User, lambda user: (construct_user, tuple(user)))

def construct_user(*args):
    print('creating new user:', args)       # for debugging
    return User(*args[:len(User._fields)])


user = User("andrew@example.com", "mypassword", "Andrew", "Smith", "cat")
print(user)
shelf["namedtupleAndrew"] = user

# redefine User
User = namedtuple("User", ("username", "password", "firstname", "surname"))

print(shelf["namedtupleAndrew"])

This will work as long as the construct_user function is available in all compatible versions, but as said initially, I would still recommend to use a different data structure.

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