10

I've got an odd problem with RelativeLayouts nested in a StackLayout, it appears that the StackLayout calculates the width of its elements should be using the RelativeLayout width and then the RelativeLayout recalculates it again afterwards. This results in the child control being the relative width squared, but the following controls being placed as at relative width.

Is this a bug or am I doing something wrong?

example

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<ContentPage x:Class="MyClass"
             xmlns="http://xamarin.com/schemas/2014/forms"
             xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2009/xaml"
             >

  <StackLayout Orientation="Horizontal" BackgroundColor="Blue">
    <RelativeLayout>
      <ContentView BackgroundColor="Red"

          RelativeLayout.XConstraint=
                "{ConstraintExpression Type=RelativeToParent,
                                      Property=Width,
                                      Factor=0}"
          RelativeLayout.WidthConstraint=
                "{ConstraintExpression Type=RelativeToParent,
                                      Property=Width,
                                      Factor=0.707106}"
          RelativeLayout.YConstraint=
                  "{ConstraintExpression Type=RelativeToParent,
                                        Property=Height,
                                        Factor=0}"
          RelativeLayout.HeightConstraint=
                "{ConstraintExpression Type=RelativeToParent,
                                      Property=Height,
                                      Factor=1}">

      </ContentView>

    </RelativeLayout>
    <RelativeLayout>
      <ContentView BackgroundColor="Green"

          RelativeLayout.XConstraint=
                "{ConstraintExpression Type=RelativeToParent,
                                      Property=Width,
                                      Factor=0}"
          RelativeLayout.WidthConstraint=
                "{ConstraintExpression Type=RelativeToParent,
                                      Property=Width,
                                      Factor=0.5}"
          RelativeLayout.YConstraint=
                  "{ConstraintExpression Type=RelativeToParent,
                                        Property=Height,
                                        Factor=0}"
          RelativeLayout.HeightConstraint=
                "{ConstraintExpression Type=RelativeToParent,
                                      Property=Height,
                                      Factor=1}">

      </ContentView>

    </RelativeLayout>

  </StackLayout>
</ContentPage>

Screen shot

  • ok done with the edits that should be complete and working code if you replace MyClass with your (empty) code behind class – Ewan Feb 8 '16 at 10:00
  • It isn't completely clear what the desired result should be. One thing I notice though is that the width specifications add up to more than 1, which might cause Xamarin some confusion. – Mark Larter May 11 '16 at 17:13
  • I would expect the two relative layouts to be 50% of the width of the screen, containing one contentView in each, which was the specified percentage width of its relative layout parent – Ewan May 11 '16 at 21:41
  • Or. Possibly something else. The documentation isnt very clear to me. But the result I get is counter intuative. Nothing is positioned or widthed to any of the values specifed – Ewan May 11 '16 at 21:43
  • Xamarin recommends using Grid over RelativeLayout, it is way too confusing, there is nothing that cannot be done in Grid. If you can post drawing of what you want, I can give you equivalent working Grid. Also Grid has better performance over RelativeLayout. – Akash Kava May 18 '16 at 8:27
6
+25

The two RelativeLayout elements could be a confusing factor, and the fact that each is specified to be at X position 0 relative to the parent StackLayout, which seems like a conflict.

It seems from the comments that if each RelativeLayout is expected to be half the width of the parent StackLayout, the layout could be simplified by eliminating one of the RelativeLayout elements.

The specified widths of the child strips could then be divided by two so that the width of each is as intended relative to the parent StackLayout, and the X positions set relative to the parent as well to position them horizontally.

Here is what I came up with:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<ContentPage x:Class="App1.HomePage"
         xmlns="http://xamarin.com/schemas/2014/forms"
         xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2009/xaml"
>

<StackLayout Orientation="Horizontal" BackgroundColor="Blue">
  <RelativeLayout>
    <ContentView BackgroundColor="Red"
        RelativeLayout.XConstraint=
          "{ConstraintExpression Type=RelativeToParent,
                                 Property=Width,
                                 Factor=0}"
        RelativeLayout.WidthConstraint=
          "{ConstraintExpression Type=RelativeToParent,
                                 Property=Width,
                                 Factor=0.35}"
        RelativeLayout.YConstraint=
          "{ConstraintExpression Type=RelativeToParent,
                                 Property=Height,
                                 Factor=0}"
        RelativeLayout.HeightConstraint=
          "{ConstraintExpression Type=RelativeToParent,
                                 Property=Height,
                                 Factor=1}">
    </ContentView>
<!--
</RelativeLayout>
<RelativeLayout>
-->
    <ContentView BackgroundColor="Green"
        RelativeLayout.XConstraint=
          "{ConstraintExpression Type=RelativeToParent,
                                 Property=Width,
                                 Factor=0.5}"
        RelativeLayout.WidthConstraint=
          "{ConstraintExpression Type=RelativeToParent,
                                 Property=Width,
                                 Factor=0.25}"
        RelativeLayout.YConstraint=
          "{ConstraintExpression Type=RelativeToParent,
                                 Property=Height,
                                 Factor=0}"
        RelativeLayout.HeightConstraint=
          "{ConstraintExpression Type=RelativeToParent,
                                 Property=Height,
                                 Factor=1}">
      </ContentView>
    </RelativeLayout>
  </StackLayout>
</ContentPage>

Does this produce something closer to what is expected?

Screenshot

  • Thanks, as this is an old question I was indeed forced to change my layout in the end (went with AbsoluteLayout) to achieve sensible results. However I'm really looking for an answer to the problem of the nested controls, not an alternative layout. obvs my real life page was much more complicated – Ewan May 12 '16 at 16:17
  • Yeah, layout with nesting gets complicated. I've really only had success with a single RelativeLayout or AbsoluteLayout within a "stack" of layouts, because otherwise they start interacting in non-intuitive (or completely bewildering) ways. – Mark Larter May 12 '16 at 16:35
2

Nothing is positioned or widthed to any of the values specified.

That isn't quite true. Just eyeballing it, the red band looks to be in about a 7:3 width ratio to the first blue band. In other words, that is the first RelativeLayout. The second RelativeLayout is partially pushed off the screen, but it does look like second ContentView is entirely on the screen, and widthed in proportion to the first two bands -- i.e. the green band is in approximately a 5:7 ratio to the red band.

In other words, the two RelativeViews did get equal allocations of space, and the two ContentViews are entirely on the screen. However the total width of the two RelativeLayouts is greater than the width of the screen!

You can look at the source code for StackLayout here: https://github.com/xamarin/Xamarin.Forms/blob/master/Xamarin.Forms.Core/StackLayout.cs

And RelativeLayout here: https://github.com/xamarin/Xamarin.Forms/blob/master/Xamarin.Forms.Core/RelativeLayout.cs.

I haven't gone through everything in detail, but there is a two pass layout for StackLayout, first trying to do a "naïve" layout, hoping all the children fit. If not, it goes through a compression pass. And since the RelativeLayout children don't have any width specified, they initially try to grab the entire width of the parent, and get compressed from there.

Basically what it comes down to is that this is an underconstrained system from the Xamarin.Forms perspective. Using StackLayout like this, where there is nothing giving a specific width from a parent or a child, can result in surprising results. For situations like this, where you don't want a dynamic layout, other layouts, like Grid, give much more predictable results.

Edit:

Upon further investigation, if you have a StackLayout with multiple children, including one (or more) RelativeLayout without a width specification, you're probably doing it wrong. Part of it makes sense, but you're also seeing the symptoms of a questionable (IMO) design decision.

RelativeLayout, by default, assumes that it is the same width as its parent. StackLayout has a multi-stage process, first doing a Measure pass, then a Layout pass, and finally a compress pass (which actually doesn't come into play in this situation). During Measure, the RelativeLayout figures out how much space it needs to actually lay out its children. For the first RelativeLayout, that means it needs about 70% of the total width of its parent (i.e. 70% of the total screen width -- I'm ignoring the fractional amount). The next RelativeLayout says that it needs 50% of the total width.

Then comes the layout pass. The first RelativeLayout is given the 70% it requested, so it lays out its child, which will be 70% of that (agreeing with your observations). The second RelativeLayout is given the 50% it asked for, and allocates 50% of it to its child. Yes, this means that StackLayout is allocating more than 100% of the screen width. Of course it will only display the first 100%.

So the way that Xamarin.Forms does the layout seems a little odd, but I'm also not sure on the constraints you have on the solution you need.

Assuming you need to have multiple RelativeLayout siblings under a StackLayout, following these instructions will get you what you want:

  1. Fill the full width of each RelativeLayout, even if it's just an empty ContentView. If you don't, the Measure/Layout pass described above is going to cause severe headaches.

  2. Assign a small MinimumWidthRequest and a HorizontalOptions including Expand to each RelativeLayout. This will allow the compress pass (mentioned above) to kick in, and give each RelativeLayout the same width allocation. In testing, I used MinimumWidthRequest="20" and HorizontalOptions="StartAndExpand" and that worked.

Doing this will provide enough constraints for the Xamarin.Forms layout engine to behave in the way you expect.

  • Experimentation suggests that its widthing the first relative layout to 70% of the screen, then widthing its content to 70% of that, then positioning the second relative layout at 70% and widthing its content to 50% of 50% – Ewan May 16 '16 at 8:32
  • See edits above with additional detail. That should explain the layout you're seeing. – DavidS May 16 '16 at 20:54
  • Do my edits answer your question? – DavidS May 18 '16 at 1:49
  • Sorry not really. are you saying there is a bug in stacklayout? that this combination isnt supported? Im looking for something more concrete. either a ref to some doc which shows this is unsupported or by design or def a bug. OR a code fix/workaround to stacklayout or relative layout which corrects the issue. – Ewan May 18 '16 at 6:08
  • The current behavior looks to be by design. You can follow the logic yourself from the links I posted. The design has some surprising consequences, like what you're dealing with. I'm not in a position to write new Xamarin documentation, officially declare if this is a bug or not, or generate an accepted fix to Xamarin.Forms. If that is what you're looking for, you may want to consider forums.xamarin.com, which Xamarin employees seem to monitor. I would assume the current behavior that I described above from reading the code is unlikely to change; it's been that way for a few releases now. – DavidS May 18 '16 at 7:19

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