2

I've made a small implementation of the famous birthday paradox, trying to find a collision between two random birthdates (here integer between 1 and 365) for the first time. But it returns always a value around let's say 40 and 70, which does not fit the stats at all. Is something wrong with my algo, or with the random int generator, both ? Thanks for your feedback.

Here is the code :

public static void main(String[] args){
    int[] birthday = new int[200];

    for(int i = 0; i<20;i++){
        Collision(birthday); 
    }
}

public static int Collision(int birthday[]){
    Random rand = new Random();  
    for(int i = 1; i<birthday.length;i++){        
        birthday[i] = rand.nextInt(365);
    }

    int count = 0;        
    for(int i = 0; i<birthday.length; i++){          
        for(int j= i+1 ; j<birthday.length; j++){            
            if (birthday[i] == birthday[j]){               
                count++;
            }            
        }          
    }

    System.out.print(count+" ");        
    return count;  
}

Here is the output for ex :

45 50 60 52 53 53 50 49 37 68 52 53 51 43 49 51 46 43 45 35

  • what's the expected average output? – Gavriel Feb 8 '16 at 10:57
  • For a set of 200 people, a collision count of between 40 and 70 sounds reasonable. – biziclop Feb 8 '16 at 10:58
  • So what do you expect? The chances of collision is almost 100% and you found on average 40. It does not contradict theory see birhtday problem calculator – Radu Ionescu Feb 8 '16 at 10:59
  • Thanks for your replies. According to the theory, the probability is 50% for a set of 23 people, which I never have...SP there should be some flaws somewhere. I would expect sometimes 25 or 15 or even less... – loukios Feb 8 '16 at 11:04
  • Doing the sums, the expected value should indeed be slightly higher, around 84. – biziclop Feb 8 '16 at 11:04
5

EDIT:
What you essentially did in your algorithm is that you generated 200 random birthdays and counted how many collisions exist among them.


You know you could make things a lot simpler by using a Set, which is empty at the beginning. Then in a simple while loop generate birthdays (numbers up to 365), try adding them in the Set, and the first time you get a collision - the number is already in the Set - you have your answer (the answer being the size of the Set).

That is, if your goal really is to find a collision in minimum number of birthdays.

E.g., this:

Random rand = new Random();
for (int t = 0; t < 20; t++)
{
    Set<Integer> b = new HashSet<Integer>();
    while (true)
    {
        int n = rand.nextInt(365);
        if (!b.add(n))
            break;
    }
    System.out.print(b.size() + " ");
}

Produces:

15 30 24 4 8 19 10 40 32 31 30 14 41 30 15 7 15 52 24 27
  • Thanks, I'm new to Java so I was not aware of it, but I'll try. – loukios Feb 8 '16 at 11:06
  • 1
    You can even simplify it to if (!b.add(n)) break; – biziclop Feb 8 '16 at 11:15
  • @biziclop Ahh, nice, I always forget that Set.add() returns boolean :) – radoh Feb 8 '16 at 11:16
  • Even more concise, use while (b.add(rand.nextInt(365))) ;. No need for temporary var n. – pjs Feb 8 '16 at 15:41
  • @pjs nice, but I'll leave it as it is, for clarity's sake, since loukios said he's new to Java. – radoh Feb 8 '16 at 15:44
3

Your numbers look fairly reasonable.

But you are repeatedly instantiating a new Random instance. That ruins the generator's statistical properties. Do it once at the beginning of your program.

(Eventually you'll need to consider February 29th too but that's very much a second-order effect).

0

Your algorithm seems OK and the results are reasonable.

FYI you could use streams to very efficiently do all the heavy lifting in 1 line:

private static Random rand = new Random(); 
public static int collision(int size) {
    return size - Stream.generate(() -> rand.nextInt(365)).limit(size).distinct().count();
}

And a 1-line main:

public static void main(String[] args){
    Stream.of(200).map(MyClass::collision).forEach(System.out::println);
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.