3

I have an event loop in my main function, in which I would like to create an object and run a thread on the object's member function. However, I have noticed that the object is destroyed before the thread is even starting. I don't understand why.

My code:

#include <iostream>
#include <thread>

class MyClass {
public:
    MyClass(){
        std::cout << "MyClass constructor is called" << std::endl;
    }
    ~MyClass(){
        std::cout << "MyClass destructor is called" << std::endl;
    }    
    void start(){
        std::cout << "MyClass is starting" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
        MyClass mine;
        std::thread t(&MyClass::start, mine);
        t.join();
}

Output:

MyClass constructor is called
MyClass destructor is called
MyClass is starting
MyClass destructor is called
MyClass destructor is called

Desired output:

MyClass constructor is called
MyClass is starting
MyClass destructor is called
2
  • 1
    When logging constructor/destructor, don't forget copy/move constructors (and potentially assignment).
    – Jarod42
    Feb 8, 2016 at 13:47
  • @PeteBecker Thanks for the advice. But allow me to respectfully disagree. Aside from the fact that my confusion simply came from a mix-up between pass-by-reference and pass-by-value (and not the basics of object lifetime), I'd rather (and have to, due to my job) learn pre-requisits that I'm missing while using more advanced features. Such comments are not the answers that learners, such as myself, are looking for in SO when encountering a problem.
    – narengi
    Feb 8, 2016 at 19:07

2 Answers 2

10

pass mine by reference: std::thread t(&MyClass::start, std::ref(mine)); the type of mine is MyClass, meaning you pass it by value. so std::thread passes a copy of it to the newly created thread.

you need to explicitly tell the template you are passing mine by reference.

7
  • Thanks for the prompt answer. I can understand that pass-by-reference was what I wanted all along. But I don't understand why the destructor is called before the thread is entering the function. If it's making a copy of the object and is working on that instead, I don't understand why its destructor is being called that early. Could you please clarify on that?
    – narengi
    Feb 8, 2016 at 13:47
  • the thread destroys the copy it holds, and the main destroys the original. this is why you see 2 destructions. if you put getchar() aftert.join() you will see only one destruction
    – David Haim
    Feb 8, 2016 at 13:48
  • 4
    @narengi Because you never log the copy copy/move constructors. You need that to see what is really happening. Feb 8, 2016 at 13:48
  • I get that the destructor should be called two times (though it's being called 3 times according to my output ?!). My question is that why "MyClass destructor is called" line is printed before "MyClass is starting" line.
    – narengi
    Feb 8, 2016 at 13:51
  • 1
    @narengi The constructor of std::thread is possibly copying/moving its argument into some kind of internal storage inside the std::thread class. So you'd have 3 objects: mine, an argument of std::thread::thread() (the ctor), and a data member in std::thread. Feb 8, 2016 at 13:52
3

std::thread internally creates local object and call copy constructor multiple times and destroy local object once used. Because of that you are getting more than one output as MyClass destructor is called. if you want to check the behavior of object construction then you can include a copy constructor in your class.

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