0

I would like to use something like dplyr's cut_number to split a column into buckets with approximately the same number of observations, where my dataset is in a compact form where each row has a weight (number of observations).

Example data frame:

df <- data.frame(
    x=c(18,17,18.5,20,20.5,24,24.4,18.3,31,34,39,20,19,34,23),
    weight=c(1,10,3,6,19,20,34,66,2,3,1,6,9,15,21)
)

If there were one observation of x per row, I would simply use df$bucket <- cut_number(df$x,3) to segment x into 3 buckets with approximately the same number of observations. But how do I take into account the fact that each row is weighted with some number of observations? I'd like to avoid splitting each row into weight rows since the original dataframe already has millions of rows.

5
  • Can you elaborate on how you want these buckets made? Should bucket one contain x1-xn, bucket 2 xn+1-xm, etc? Or should each bucket contain as close to sum(weight)/number_of_buckets x's? – Heroka Feb 8 '16 at 18:47
  • The latter: each bucket should contain as close to sum(weight)/number_of_buckets x's as possible. – Big Dogg Feb 8 '16 at 19:06
  • This seems like a simple problem of creating intervals, but I'm unclear on the desired output. If your data are df <- data.frame(x=1:6, weight=c(1,1,1,1,4,1)), do you draw the buckets as 123|455|556 or 123|45|6 (where | denotes a bucket boundary)? – Megatron Feb 8 '16 at 19:14
  • In my application, every row should be assigned a unique bucket. So out of your two suggested partitions, the former would be inadmissible and I'd pick the latter. – Big Dogg Feb 8 '16 at 19:23
  • Does my answer work for you in any way? – Heroka Feb 8 '16 at 19:24
1

Based on the comments, I think this may be the interval set you are seeking. Apologies for the general un-R-ness of it:

dfTest <- data.frame(x=1:6, weight=c(1,1,1,1,4,1))

f <- function(df, n) {
  interval <- round(sum(df$weight) / n)
  buckets <- vector(mode="integer", length(nrow(df)))
  bucketNum <- 1
  count <- 0
  for (i in 1:nrow(df)) {
    count <- count + df$weight[i]
    buckets[i] <- bucketNum
    if (count >= interval) {
      bucketNum <- bucketNum + 1
      count <- 0
    }
  }
  return(buckets)
}

Running this function buckets items as follows:

dfTest$bucket <- f(dfTest, 3)

#    x weight bucket
#  1 1      1      1
#  2 2      1      1
#  3 3      1      1
#  4 4      1      2
#  5 5      4      2
#  6 6      1      3

For your example:

df$bucket <- f(df, 3)
#        x weight bucket
#  1  18.0      1      1
#  2  17.0     10      1
#  3  18.5      3      1
#  4  20.0      6      1
#  5  20.5     19      1
#  6  24.0     20      1
#  7  24.4     34      1
#  8  18.3     66      2
#  9  31.0      2      2
#  10 34.0      3      2
#  11 39.0      1      2
#  12 20.0      6      3
#  13 19.0      9      3
#  14 34.0     15      3
#  15 23.0     21      3
1

Here's another approach, based on my assumption that you have in total x1*weight1 + x2*weight2 +..... observations. Furthermore, each 'unique' observation can only be in one bucket. The approach uses sorting and the cumulative sum of the weights to create the buckets.

#sort data
df <- df[order(df$x),]

#calculate cumulative weights (this is why we sort)
df$cumulative_weight <- cumsum(df$weight)

#create bucket by cumulative weight
n_buckets <- 3
df$bucket <- cut(df$cumulative_weight, n_buckets)

#check: calculate total number of observations per bucket   


> aggregate(weight~bucket,FUN=sum, data=df)
       bucket weight
1 (9.79,78.7]     77
2  (78.7,147]     64
3   (147,216]     75

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.