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I am trying to write a launcher-like app which can add Widgets to its screen.

I am using Leonardo Fischer's tutorial (http://leonardofischer.com/hosting-android-widgets-my-appwidgethost-tutorial/) which is great.

In order to remove a widget, the user is supposed to longpress the Widget and that's where I am running into some trouble; some Widgets (WhatsApp Messagelist, Evernote List, for instance) allow you to scroll them. For some reason, if you scroll, Android fires a LongClick event which wrongfully removes the widget...

My code: (creates the widget and set LongClickListener)

public void createWidget(Intent data) {
    Bundle extras = data.getExtras();
    int appWidgetId = extras.getInt(AppWidgetManager.EXTRA_APPWIDGET_ID, -1);
    AppWidgetProviderInfo appWidgetInfo = mAppWidgetManager.getAppWidgetInfo(appWidgetId);

    final LauncherAppWidgetHostView hostView = (LauncherAppWidgetHostView) mAppWidgetHost.createView(this, appWidgetId, appWidgetInfo);
    hostView.setAppWidget(appWidgetId, appWidgetInfo);

    // relative layout
    //RelativeLayout.LayoutParams lp = new RelativeLayout()
    //mainlayout.addView(hostView, lp);
    mainlayout.addView(hostView);

    // [COMMENTED OUT] hostView.setOnLongClickListener(new AppWidgetLongClickListener(hostView));

}

UPDATE

Countless hours later, I think I partially understood what's happening, but I still can't get the correct behaviour.

According to http://balpha.de/2013/07/android-development-what-i-wish-i-had-known-earlier/ , you need to implement an onInterceptTouchEvent in the parent container (mainlayout in my case) to intercept and treat events before they reach the children (widgets in my case).

So I googled up the following code and tried to adapt to my needs:

@Override
public boolean onInterceptTouchEvent(MotionEvent ev) {
    // Consume any touch events for ourselves after longpress is triggered
    //Log.i(TAG,"OnIntercept: "+ev.toString());
    if (mHasPerformedLongPress) {
        Log.i(TAG,"Longpress OK!: "+ev.toString());
        mHasPerformedLongPress = false;
        return true;
    }

    // Watch for longpress events at this level to make sure
    // users can always pick up this widget
    switch (ev.getAction()) {
        case MotionEvent.ACTION_DOWN: {
            postCheckForLongClick();
            break;
        }

        case MotionEvent.ACTION_UP:
        case MotionEvent.ACTION_CANCEL:
            mHasPerformedLongPress = false;
            if (mPendingCheckForLongPress != null) {
                removeCallbacks(mPendingCheckForLongPress);
            }
            break;
    }

    // Otherwise continue letting touch events fall through to children
    return false;
}

class CheckForLongPress implements Runnable {
    private int mOriginalWindowAttachCount;

    public void run() {
        Log.i(TAG,"Inside RUN");
        if (getParent()!= null) {
            Log.i(TAG,"getParent:"+getParent().toString());
        }
        if ((getParent() != null) && hasWindowFocus()
                && (mOriginalWindowAttachCount == getWindowAttachCount())
                && !mHasPerformedLongPress) {
            if (performLongClick()) { // <-- DOESN'T WORK :(
                mHasPerformedLongPress = true;
            }
        }
    }

    public void rememberWindowAttachCount() {
        mOriginalWindowAttachCount = getWindowAttachCount();
    }
}

private void postCheckForLongClick() {
    mHasPerformedLongPress = false;

    if (mPendingCheckForLongPress == null) {
        mPendingCheckForLongPress = new CheckForLongPress();
    }
    mPendingCheckForLongPress.rememberWindowAttachCount();
    postDelayed(mPendingCheckForLongPress, ViewConfiguration.getLongPressTimeout());
}

@Override
public void cancelLongPress() {
    super.cancelLongPress();

    mHasPerformedLongPress = false;
    if (mPendingCheckForLongPress != null) {
        removeCallbacks(mPendingCheckForLongPress);
    }
}

The above code does intercept touch events when I click a widget, but its logic seems aimed at intercepting (and direct for further treatment) longclicks to widgets. What I actually need is to intercept a longclick inside the parent view.

The trick seems to lie at if (performLongClick()), which, as far as I could get, fires a LongClick event to the widget...

... so I guess my question now is how to track a longclick inside the parent view.

Sorry for the long (and seemingly basic) question on handling Android UI events, but from what I googled this seems a very convoluted topic..

1

So it's done...! I am not sure whether this is an elegant solution, but it works.

onInterceptTouchEvent allows a parent view to act on events before they are sent to the final sender. Please note the it won't fire if you touch the actual view. So if you have a Layout with some "blank space" and some elements, onInterceptTouchEvent won't fire if you touch the layout's "blank space" (you will need the layout's onTouchEvent in this case).

Because we can essentially only track ACTION_UP, ACTION_MOVE and ACTION_DOWN events, we need to time the duration of a ACTION_DOWN / ACTION_UPpair of events to decide whether this is a longclick or not, so what I did follows:

public class time_counter {
    private long begin_time;
    private long end_time;


    public time_counter(long i, long f) {
        this.begin_time = i;
        this.end_time = f;
    }

    public long getDuration() {
        return (this.end_time - this.begin_time);
    }

}

@Override
public boolean onInterceptTouchEvent(MotionEvent ev) {

    // Consume any touch events for ourselves after longpress is triggered

    // Watch for longpress events at this level to make sure
    // users can always pick up this widget
    switch (ev.getAction()) {
        case MotionEvent.ACTION_DOWN: {
            cnt = new time_counter(ev.getEventTime(), (long)0);
            break;
        }

        case MotionEvent.ACTION_MOVE: {
            if (cnt != null) {
                cnt.end_time = ev.getEventTime();
            }
            break;
        }
        case MotionEvent.ACTION_UP:
        case MotionEvent.ACTION_CANCEL:
            if (cnt != null) {
                cnt.end_time = ev.getEventTime();
            }
            Log.i(TAG, "DURATION: " + cnt.getDuration());
            if (cnt.getDuration() > ViewConfiguration.getLongPressTimeout()) {
                Log.i(TAG, "it's a longpress: " + this.toString());
                if (processClick) {
                    processClick = false;
                    this.doRemoveWidget();
                }
                cancelLongPress();
                return true;
            }
            break;
    }

    // Otherwise continue letting touch events fall through to children
    return false;
}

Whenever Android sends an ACTION_DOWN event, the code start to track its duration using a simple "time counter" object. The counter's end timestamp is continually updated throughout ACTION_MOVE events and when Android sends an ACTION_UP or ACTION_CANCEL, the code checks for the final duration. If it's over ViewConfiguration.getLongPressTimeout() (default = 500ms), it triggers the action.

Notice that in my case I needed a boolean variable to prevent multiple event firing, since I wanted to use a LongClick to remove a widget. A second accidental firing, which would almost always happen, would trigger a null pointer exception since the widget had already been removed.

I tested it with several widgets (big, small, configurable, with and without scrolling views, etc, etc, etc.) and I haven't found a glitch.

Again, not sure if this an elegant or "android-wise" solution, but it solved my problem.

Hope this helps!

REFERENCE: If you need an excellent article on touch events, please check http://balpha.de/2013/07/android-development-what-i-wish-i-had-known-earlier/. It gave me the correct "frame of mind" to address my problem.

0

If you really are seeing an event for starting a scroll being followed by an event for a long click, you could deal with that by setting a flag in your event handling class that tracks when scroll begins and ends, and choose to ignore the long click if a scroll is in progress.

  • Thanks for the idea, but as you can see in my code snippet, I am implementing setOnLongClickListener and from what I could look into, AppWidgetHostView doesn't have an interface to track scroll events. Can you point me in the right direction here? – Pbal Feb 9 '16 at 23:20
  • From you problem description, it sounded like you have a scrolling widget. If you don't have a scrolling widget, then the home screen may interpret a slow drag as a long press, and there's nothing you can do to change that. – Doug Stevenson Feb 9 '16 at 23:45
  • You're right; widgets such as WhatsApp Unread List and Evernote list are scrolling widgets and whenever I scroll them, it seems a LongClick is fired. I have checked Google Launcher source code and it uses almost the same logic as mine (except they handle multiple screens, while my poor man's Launcher is a "one-screen-only"...) and this type of widget doesn't generate this odd behaviour... I am sure I am missing something, but I can't figure it out. – Pbal Feb 10 '16 at 0:52
  • You might have to reach into the RemoteViews that make up the widget and see if one of them wants to be able to scroll, then assume that the whole thing could scroll? That sounds tough. – Doug Stevenson Feb 10 '16 at 1:38

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