29

I have a uuid field (not a primary key). The generated migration is:

from __future__ import unicode_literals

from django.db import migrations, models
import uuid


class Migration(migrations.Migration):

    dependencies = [
        ....
    ]

    operations = [
        ...
        migrations.AddField(
            model_name='device',
            name='uuid',
            field=models.UUIDField(default=uuid.uuid4, unique=True),
        ),
        ...
    ]

But when doing python manage.py migrate it is crashing with:

django.db.utils.IntegrityError: could not create unique index "restaurants_device_uuid_key" DETAIL: Key (uuid)=(f3858ded-b8e0-4ac0-8436-8a61b10efc73) is duplicated.

Strangely enough, the problem does not seem to occur with primary keys (which are maybe created by the database, and not internally by django?)

How can I add a uuid field, and make sure that migrations work?

  • 9
    The docs explain this pretty well, see Migrations that add unique fields. – knbk Feb 8 '16 at 23:25
  • @knbk: Thanks. That is amazing. Amaizingly interesting and amazingly complex. Just .. to .. generate .. uuids – dangonfast Feb 8 '16 at 23:37
  • Alternatively, it's a hack but gives a similar functionality, and way simpler: str_uuid = models.CharField(max_length=36,default=lambda:str(uuid.uuid4())). After migration, run a loop for each object in the model and save() it to get a unique uuid. You don't need a unique index because the chances of the same uuid4 are near zero. – Aviah Laor Feb 9 '16 at 7:51
  • @AviahLaor: interesting workaround. My solution was even simpler: remove the unique=True constraint. The UUIDs are going to come from the frontend anyway (they refer to mobile devices), so technically I do not even need a default. It is a bit weird, because they really must be unique, but I could not get it to work with default=None and unique=True, which is actually what I wanted: they must be unique as long as they are not empty. I do not know even if django (or the database backend) supports that kind of constraint. – dangonfast Feb 9 '16 at 8:38
  • Actually yes, the whole idea of UUID is that it's unique no matter where it was created – Aviah Laor Feb 9 '16 at 8:44
27

Here is an example doing everything in one single migration thanks to a RunPython call.

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*
from __future__ import unicode_literals

from django.db import migrations, models
import uuid


def create_uuid(apps, schema_editor):
    Device = apps.get_model('device_app', 'Device')
    for device in Device.objects.all():
        device.uuid = uuid.uuid4()
        device.save()


class Migration(migrations.Migration):

    dependencies = [
        ('device_app', 'XXXX'),
    ]

    operations = [
        migrations.AddField(
            model_name='device',
            name='uuid',
            field=models.UUIDField(blank=True, null=True),
        ),
        migrations.RunPython(create_uuid),
        migrations.AlterField(
            model_name='device',
            name='uuid',
            field=models.UUIDField(unique=True)
        )
    ]
  • 1
    But isn't there a race condition here? If user is edited while create_uuid is running, their data will be overwritten (granted, Django tries to lock the table to prevent that). Instead, it should be device.save(update_fields=['uuid']), as in the Django docs. – phihag Jul 11 '18 at 14:41
  • This answer does not reference the related docs, and does not provide any explanation – autopoietic Dec 11 '18 at 16:42
13

(Answer taken from the first comment)

See the django docs - Migrations that add unique fields

They recommend changing your single migration into three separate migrations:

  1. Create field, set to null but not unique
  2. Generate unique UUIDs
  3. Alter the field to be unique
2

In the mode, you have configured, that you want unique values for the uuid fields, but with default values(the same for all). So if you have two 'device' objects in the database, the migrations add 'uuid' field to them with the default 'uuid.uuid4' value and when it tries to set it to the second one, it crashes because of the unique constrains.

If you drop your db and create new objects probably there will be not problems but thats not a solution for production db obviously :D.

A better solution is to create a data migration which sets different uuid value (generated by the default 'uuid' library) to every existing object in the database. You can read more about data migrations here: https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.10/topics/migrations/#data-migrations

Then, when you create new objects, django will generate different uuid automatically. ;)

For the primary keys: Django adds it to the model by default.

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