4

A basic example of multiprocessing Process class runs when executed from file, but not from IDLE. Why is that and can it be done?

from multiprocessing import Process

def f(name):
    print('hello', name)

p = Process(target=f, args=('bob',))
p.start()
p.join()
  • @MathBio I have dupe closed the other with this. The answer on this post is by the dev of Python IDLE and is hence far more superior. – Bhargav Rao Feb 9 '16 at 18:22
7

Yes. The following works in that function f is run in a separate (third) process.

from multiprocessing import Process

def f(name):
    print('hello', name)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    p = Process(target=f, args=('bob',))
    p.start()
    p.join()

However, to see the print output, at least on Windows, one must start IDLE from a console like so.

C:\Users\Terry>python -m idlelib
hello bob

(Use idlelib.idle on 2.x.) The reason is that IDLE runs user code in a separate process. Currently the connection between the IDLE process and the user code process is via a socket. The fork done by multiprocessing does not duplicate or inherit the socket connection. When IDLE is started via an icon or Explorer (in Windows), there is nowhere for the print output to go. When started from a console with python (rather than pythonw), output goes to the console, as above.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I have previously thought about adding 'Run in Console' to the IDLE Run menu. The previous use cases I had for this, using Windows getch and colorizing print output, are rather esoteric. Seeing print output from multiprocesses is much less so, and is needed for debugging multiprocessing code with printstatements. So I am boosting the priority of this addition. – Terry Jan Reedy Feb 9 '16 at 17:23

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.