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If the session is stored in proc

The user logs in, closes the browser directly and reopens it after an hour. Would he need to log in again?

  1. If the web application uses cookies and cookies are enabled on the users browser...
  2. If the web application uses persistent cookies and cookies are enabled on the users browser...
  3. If the web application uses cookies and cookies are disabled on the users browser...
  4. If the web application uses persistent cookies and cookies are disabled on the users browser...

If session is stored in state server and situations are the same, then what would happen?

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When a session is created (assuming it is a normal session), a cookie is sent to the browser that looks something like this:

SESSION_ID=437b930db84b8079c2dd804a71936b5f

Sessions can be used without cookies if the session identifier (in the example above, 437b930db84b8079c2dd804a71936b5f) is passed around as request parameter instead of a cookie; however, this is rather uncommon and it is generally considered bad practice.

All session information is stored server-side, and the session identifier is used behind-the-scenes to decide which set of information should be recalled (if any) for each request. Thus we get to your questions.

  1. If the web application uses cookies and cookies are enabled on the users browser...

If the web app uses cookies and cookies are enabled on the browser, then there should not be a problem. With a standard session implementation, the cookies will be non-persistent, though, so the user will need to login again if he/she completely closes all instances of the browser.

  1. If the web application uses persistent cookies and cookies are enabled on the users browser...

If the session-id is stored in a persistent cookie and user's browser respects that by persisting the session identifier cookie to the disk, then the session identifier will be sent even if the browser is fully closed and restarted. However, please be aware that most web frameworks have a garbage-collector-like system that deletes data for sessions that have showed any activity over a certain amount of time. So, for example, let's say my website requires activity at least once every 4 hours to keep a session active. If I login, receive a persistent cookie with my session ID, close my browser, and come back 5 hours later, then I will need to login again because my session information would have been cleared from the server even though my session ID cookie was persistent.

  1. If the web application uses cookies and cookies are disabled on the users browser...

Bad news bears. You will either need to find a way to use a cookieless session (passing an identifier as a parameter for each request), or you will need to ask the user to enable cookies. There is no way around this.

  1. If the web application uses persistent cookies and cookies are disabled on the users browser...

Same situation as #3. If the user has cookies disabled, you are out of luck. Either they need to enable cookies (at least for your site), or you need to find another way to pass around information between requests.

  • Would it be the same if the session is not stored inproc but is stored separately? Also, when the application is already created and depends on cookies for session, how would it work when the user has cookies disabled? Another thing, if the user has set the browser to clear cookies when he closes the browser, is the data in persistent cookies lost? – whoadityanawandar Feb 9 '16 at 18:06
  • @stylojack_10, I have not used the ASP.NET framework in years, but after doing a brief search about InProc, it should not matter if the sessions are stored InProc or otherwise. The only time that would make a difference is in the case that the local web server is restarted (in which case the memory will be reset and all session data will be lost). As stated in my answer, if the user has cookies disabled and the web app relies on cookies, then the web app will not be able to run properly. Also, if the browser clears cookies on exit, then we can expect that all persistent cookies will be lost. – Spencer D Feb 9 '16 at 18:26
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Session is stored in server memory (unless a state server or persistant store is used) but relies on a cookie to identify the session. If cookies aren't available then session won't work since there is no way to identify the user. Cookieless sessions can be used to get around this. Cookieless sessions aren't recommended as they can be hijacked with the session identifier in the url.

If an expiration isn't set on the cookie then it will be lost once the user closes all browser instances (they share memory) and not just the one visited through the website.

If the user has cookies disabled, then cookies aren't available for use by the application. People aren't as worried about cookies now as they were in the late 90's (lots of "security" people raised warnings that cookies could be used to store all sorts of things on your computer, even viruses).

  • "If cookies aren't available then session won't work"...meaning? What would happen in such cases? Will the user have to log in every time he opens the website? What about across tabs? – whoadityanawandar Feb 9 '16 at 14:29
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    That means that the system cannot tie a browser to the session data stored for that particular browser session. If a user logs in, you can set the session variable for that user in the login form, redirect to another page, and if that page checks for username variable in session it won't exist. Cross tabs is irrelevant because it's all just instances of the browser and they all share a cookie pool. Bottom line, if no cookies then you can't do session securely. Also, look at the membership or Identity systems as they provide much better alternatives then storing username in session. – Mark Fitzpatrick Feb 10 '16 at 23:41

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