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to use matplotlib colorbar, one has to specify a matplotlib.cm.ScalarMappable with an object from a subclass of matplotlib.colors.Normalize, from which the colorbar can know how to normalise the data into [0,1] float value.

there are only a few normalisation process provided by matplotlib, linear normalisation, log, power law etc. but in practice, we might want to use other normalisation function written by ourselves.

we can normalise the data array into [0,1] using whatever function, but without Scalarmappable built with Nomalization subclass, the colorbar won't have ticks and labels right.

I am wondering is it my understanding to matplotlib colorbar right or there is other way to do it quite easily? or perhaps we have to manually write a subclass to wrap the custom normalisation function?

2 Answers 2

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You can easily subclass matplotlib.colors.Normalize for this purpose. Here's an example of a piece-wise normalization class I wrote for a previous SO question:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib.colors import Normalize

class PiecewiseNorm(Normalize):
    def __init__(self, levels, clip=False):
        # input levels
        self._levels = np.sort(levels)
        # corresponding normalized values between 0 and 1
        self._normed = np.linspace(0, 1, len(levels))
        Normalize.__init__(self, None, None, clip)

    def __call__(self, value, clip=None):
        # linearly interpolate to get the normalized value
        return np.ma.masked_array(np.interp(value, self._levels, self._normed))

    def inverse(self, value):
        return 1.0 - self.__call__(value)

For example:

y, x = np.mgrid[0.0:3.0:100j, 0.0:5.0:100j]
H = 50.0 * np.exp( -(x**2 + y**2) / 4.0 )
levels = [0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 20, 50]

H1 = -50.0 * np.exp( -(x**2 + y**2) / 4.0 )
levels1 = [-50, -20, -9, -6, -3, -2, -1, 0]

fig, ax = plt.subplots(2, 2, gridspec_kw={'width_ratios':(20, 1), 'wspace':0.05})

im0 = ax[0, 0].contourf(x, y, H, levels, cmap='jet', norm=PiecewiseNorm(levels))
cb0 = fig.colorbar(im0, cax=ax[0, 1])
im1 = ax[1, 0].contourf(x, y, H1, levels1, cmap='jet', norm=PiecewiseNorm(levels1))
cb1 = fig.colorbar(im1, cax=ax[1, 1])

plt.show()

enter image description here

3
  • fantastic! your example just shows how easily it can be done. I mean, matplotlib docs is kinda lazy, without checking the source code I am not sure call and inverse() mean. so basically just wrap normalisation function with call and proceed with cautious.
    – Hualin
    Feb 10, 2016 at 18:54
  • To be honest I'm not entirely sure what inverse is actually used for - the example I gave will work without overriding that method in the derived class, but it just seemed safer to define it anyway.
    – ali_m
    Feb 10, 2016 at 19:13
  • by checking the source code inverse(), it is defined in Normalization subclass, such as linear, power-law and log kinds, mapping the normalised value into its original, which seems to be the face-value of the method name. the method actually is only called in a private method in ColorbarBase. there are very little docs and comments there, a strange land with no road sign.
    – Hualin
    Feb 11, 2016 at 15:31
0

thanks for @ali_m 's idea, a few days later I think I get an idea of defining a custom Normalization subclass with any normalisation function y=func(x). basically replace the private member self._normed with the normalised values given by any func(self._levels). and when initialising the subclass, one must give the function hook to the normalisation function func. But be sure the func must be a truly normalisation.

the code below is inspired by @ali_m 's answer:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib.colors import Normalize

class CustomNorm(Normalize):
    def __init__(self, levels, func, clip=None):
        # input levels
        self._levels = np.linspace(min(levels), max(levels), 10)
        # corresponding normalized values between 0 and 1
        self._normed = func(self._levels)
        Normalize.__init__(self, None, None, clip)

    def __call__(self, value, clip=None):
        # linearly interpolate to get the normalized value
        return np.ma.masked_array(np.interp(value, self._levels, self._normed))

    def inverse(self, value):
        return 1.0 - self.__call__(value)

def func(x):
    # whatever function, just normalise x into a sub-field of [0,1], 
    # it can be even [0,0.5]
    return x/50.0/2.0

y, x = np.mgrid[0.0:3.0:100j, 0.0:5.0:100j]
H = 50.0 * np.exp( -(x**2 + y**2) / 4.0 )
levels = [0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 20, 50]
# levels = [0, 50]

# H1 = -50.0 * np.exp( -(x**2 + y**2) / 4.0 )
# levels1 = [-50, -20, -9, -6, -3, -2, -1, 0]
# levels1 = [-50, 0]

fig, ax = plt.subplots(2, 2, gridspec_kw={'width_ratios':(20, 1), 'wspace':0.05})

im0 = ax[0, 0].contourf(x, y, H, cmap='jet', norm=CustomNorm(levels, func))
cb0 = fig.colorbar(im0, cax=ax[0, 1])
# im1 = ax[1, 0].contourf(x, y, H1, levels1, cmap='jet', norm=CustomNorm(levels1, func))
# cb1 = fig.colorbar(im1, cax=ax[1, 1])

plt.show()

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