74

I read that async functions marked by the async keyword implicitly return a promise:

async function getVal(){
 return await doSomethingAync();
}

var ret = getVal();
console.log(ret);

but that is not coherent...assuming doSomethingAsync() returns a promise, and the await keyword will return the value from the promise, not the promise itsef, then my getVal function should return that value, not an implicit promise.

So what exactly is the case? Do functions marked by the async keyword implicitly return promises or do we control what they return?

Perhaps if we don't explicitly return something, then they implicitly return a promise...?

To be more clear, there is a difference between the above and

function doSomethingAync(charlie) {
    return new Promise(function (resolve) {
        setTimeout(function () {
            resolve(charlie || 'yikes');
        }, 100);
    })
}

async function getVal(){
   var val = await doSomethingAync();  // val is not a promise
   console.log(val); // logs 'yikes' or whatever
   return val;  // but this returns a promise
}

var ret = getVal();
console.log(ret);  //logs a promise

In my synopsis the behavior is indeed inconsistent with traditional return statements. It appears that when you explicitly return a non-promise value from an async function, it will force wrap it in a promise. I don't have a big problem with it, but it does defy normal JS.

  • What does console.log show? – Barmar Feb 9 '16 at 21:24
  • it's the value passed by the promise resolve function, not the promise itself – Alexander Mills Feb 9 '16 at 21:25
  • Perhaps await unwraps the result from promise. – Hamlet Hakobyan Feb 9 '16 at 21:30
  • actually, I was wrong, it logs a promise – Alexander Mills Feb 9 '16 at 21:43
  • 2
    JavaScript's promises are trying to mimic c#'s async await behavior. However, there was a lot of structure in place historically to support that with c#, and none in JavaScript. So while in many use cases it may seem to be very similar, it is somewhat of a misnomer. – Travis J Feb 9 '16 at 21:58
84

The return value will always be a promise. If you don't explicitly return a promise, the value you return will automatically be wrapped in a promise.

async function increment(num) {
  return num + 1;
}

// Even though you returned a number, the value is
// automatically wrapped in a promise, so we call
// `then` on it to access the returned value.
//
// Logs: 4
increment(3).then(num => console.log(num));

Same thing even if there's an await.

function defer(callback) {
  return new Promise(function(resolve) {
    setTimeout(function() {
      resolve(callback());
    }, 1000);
  });
}

async function incrementTwice(num) {
  const numPlus1 = await defer(() => num + 1);
  return numPlus1 + 1;
}

// Logs: 5
incrementTwice(3).then(num => console.log(num));

Promises auto-unwrap, so if you do return a promise for a value from within an async function, you will receive a promise for the value (not a promise for a promise for the value).

function defer(callback) {
  return new Promise(function(resolve) {
    setTimeout(function() {
      resolve(callback());
    }, 1000);
  });
}

async function increment(num) {
  // It doesn't matter whether you put an `await` here.
  return defer(() => num + 1);
}

// Logs: 4
increment(3).then(num => console.log(num));

In my synopsis the behavior is indeed inconsistent with traditional return statements. It appears that when you explicitly return a non-promise value from an async function, it will force wrap it in a promise. I don't have a big problem with it, but it does defy normal JS.

ES6 has functions which don't return exactly the same value as the return. These functions are called generators.

function* foo() {
  return 'test';
}

// Logs an object.
console.log(foo());

// Logs 'test'.
console.log(foo().next().value);
  • 2
    "the value you return will automatically be wrapped in a promise" by the static method Promise.resolve, i.e, if the return statement of an async function is - return x; it implicitly becomes - return Promise.resolve(x); – adnan2nd Nov 12 '17 at 18:01
15

I took a look at the spec and found the following information. The short version is that an async function desugars to a generator which yields Promises. So, yes, async functions return promises.

According to the tc39 spec, the following is true:

async function <name>?<argumentlist><body>

Desugars to:

function <name>?<argumentlist>{ return spawn(function*() <body>, this); }

Where spawn "is a call to the following algorithm":

function spawn(genF, self) {
    return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
        var gen = genF.call(self);
        function step(nextF) {
            var next;
            try {
                next = nextF();
            } catch(e) {
                // finished with failure, reject the promise
                reject(e);
                return;
            }
            if(next.done) {
                // finished with success, resolve the promise
                resolve(next.value);
                return;
            }
            // not finished, chain off the yielded promise and `step` again
            Promise.resolve(next.value).then(function(v) {
                step(function() { return gen.next(v); });
            }, function(e) {
                step(function() { return gen.throw(e); });
            });
        }
        step(function() { return gen.next(undefined); });
    });
}
  • 4
    Thanks for doing the research! – baszak Aug 1 '18 at 18:24
-2

async doesn't return the promise, the await keyword awaits the resolution of the promise. async is an enhanced generator function and await works a bit like yield

I think the syntax (I am not 100% sure) is

async function* getVal() {...}

ES2016 generator functions work a bit like this. I have made a database handler based in top of tedious which you program like this

db.exec(function*(connection) {
  if (params.passwd1 === '') {
    let sql = 'UPDATE People SET UserName = @username WHERE ClinicianID = @clinicianid';
    let request = connection.request(sql);
    request.addParameter('username',db.TYPES.VarChar,params.username);
    request.addParameter('clinicianid',db.TYPES.Int,uid);
    yield connection.execSql();
  } else {
    if (!/^\S{4,}$/.test(params.passwd1)) {
      response.end(JSON.stringify(
        {status: false, passwd1: false,passwd2: true}
      ));
      return;
    }
    let request = connection.request('SetPassword');
    request.addParameter('userID',db.TYPES.Int,uid);
    request.addParameter('username',db.TYPES.NVarChar,params.username);
    request.addParameter('password',db.TYPES.VarChar,params.passwd1);
    yield connection.callProcedure();
  }
  response.end(JSON.stringify({status: true}));

}).catch(err => {
  logger('database',err.message);
  response.end(JSON.stringify({status: false,passwd1: false,passwd2: false}));
});

Notice how I just program it like normal synchronous particularly at

yield connection.execSql and at yield connection.callProcedure

The db.exec function is a fairly typical Promise based generator

exec(generator) {
  var self = this;
  var it;
  return new Promise((accept,reject) => {
    var myConnection;
    var onResult = lastPromiseResult => {
      var obj = it.next(lastPromiseResult);
      if (!obj.done) {
        obj.value.then(onResult,reject);
      } else {
       if (myConnection) {
          myConnection.release();
        }
        accept(obj.value);
      }
    };
    self._connection().then(connection => {
      myConnection = connection;
      it = generator(connection); //This passes it into the generator
      onResult();  //starts the generator
    }).catch(error => {
      reject(error);
    });
  });
}
  • 4
    "async is an enhanced generator function" - no, it really is not. – Bergi Feb 10 '16 at 11:52
  • As stated above - 'async functions' do indeed return a Promise. Conceptually at least, the main point of the 'async' statement is to wrap that function's return values in a promise. You can even 'await' on a plain old function that returns a Promise, and it all works, because 'async function' === 'function returning Promise'. – spechter May 8 '18 at 7:43
  • @bergi, actually, it is an enhanced generator function. a generator function which always returns a promise .. or something. – Alexander Mills Aug 18 '18 at 8:31

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