34

I'm using TypeScript with a dependency injection library which works very similar to Angular 1 - basically: register a factory with your dependencies as arguments.

This is how I would register a class in ES6

export let factory = () => {
    return class Foo {}
};

If I write the same in TypeScript:

export let factory = () => {
    return class Foo {}
};

It fails to compile with the error

error TS4025: Exported variable 'factory' has or is using private name 'Foo'.

Is there any way to allow TypeScript to return a class from a factory function?

8 Answers 8

23

Quick answer

change this:

export let factory = () => {
    return class Foo {}
};

to that:

export let factory = () : any => {
    return class Foo {}
};

Longer answer

This error could be triggered/forced by to a tsconfig.json setting:

{
    "compilerOptions": {
        ...
        "declaration": true // this should be false or omitted

But that is not the reason, it is just a trigger. The real reason (as discussed here Error when exporting function that returns class: Exported variable has or is using private name) comes from the Typescript compiler

when TS compiler founds statement like this

let factory = () => { ...

it must start to guess what is the return type, because that information is missing (check the : <returnType> placeholder):

let factory = () : <returnType> => { ...

in our case, TS will quickly find out, that the returned type is easy to guess:

return class Foo {} // this is returned value, 
                    // that could be treated as a return type of the factory method

so, in case we would have that similar statement (this is not the same, as original statement at all, but let's just try to use it as an example to clarify what happens) we can properly declare return type:

export class Foo {} // Foo is exported
export let factory = () : Foo => { // it could be return type of export function
    return Foo
};

that approach would be working, because the Foo class is exported, i.e. visible to external world.

Back to our case. We want to return type which is not exported. And then, we MUST help TS compiler to decide, what is the return type.

It could be explicit any:

export let factory = () : any => {
    return class Foo {}
};

But even better would be to have some public interface

export interface IFoo {}

And then use such interface as return type:

export let factory = () : IFoo => {
    return class Foo implements IFoo {}
};
4
  • 6
    good answer! And now it works even with declaration: true! :) However, your final suggestion is exactly what I did try in the beginning - that does not work: Type 'typeof Foo' is not assignable to type 'IFoo'.
    – MiB
    Oct 17, 2016 at 11:26
  • 1
    @MiB I would say, that this is another issue. Check this playground example ... showing such issue.. in case, if IFoo as interface requires something.. which Foo does not implement... in that example IFoo {x:boolean} requires x but class does not have it class Foo implements IFoo {} hope it helps a bit Oct 17, 2016 at 11:31
  • 2
    I guess that's true, but in my case adding public x: boolean = false; to class Foo still results in the same error. Check this
    – MiB
    Oct 17, 2016 at 21:51
  • 1
    Using the any type only hides the problem, it does not solve it. This is not a real solution. May 17, 2023 at 12:53
8

Late answer on old question:

You need to have the class defined outside the factory method and define return value using 'typeof'.

class Foo {}

export const factory = (): typeof Foo => {
    return Foo;
};
2
  • 1
    Why isn't this the accepted answer? Thank you @Niels Steenbeek Sep 14, 2021 at 23:46
  • 3
    Sometimes factory takes arguments which are used to define the class, in which case this doesn't work.
    – Luke Worth
    Sep 27, 2021 at 2:18
7

I think this is a proper way to do it:

export let factory = () => {
     class Foo {/* ... */}
     return Foo as (new () => { [key in keyof Foo]: Foo[key] })
};

Check it out on playground

2

You need to export the class as well so that the consumer of the method can access the type.

Typically a factory will return an instance rather than a class or constructor.

UPDATED EXAMPLE

export class Foo {}; 

export let factory = () => {
    return Foo;
};

With ES6 you don't need to export the class type, but with TypeScript you absolutely should exporting the type signatures.

4
  • 4
    Not terribly helpful given the use case of returning a dynamically generated class (e.g. React HOC).
    – Steve
    Feb 17, 2019 at 9:34
  • The original question is about implementing the Factory pattern in typescript (using AngularJS), and resolving a compiler error. It says nothing about generating a dynamically generated class.
    – Martin
    Feb 18, 2019 at 8:06
  • 1
    @Martin the question literally contains only an example of a dynamic class. Dec 11, 2020 at 15:03
  • @MarcJ.Schmidt yes that is because ES6 is a dynamic language, where the question is how to do it in TypeScript -- which adds type signatures.
    – Martin
    Dec 14, 2020 at 10:50
2

I've found separately provided solution satisfying:

export class MyClass {
   ...
}

export type MyClassRef = new (...args: any) => MyClass;

Given that signature I can use MyClassRef as a type of return value:

exposeMyClass(): MyClassRef {
    return MyClass;
}
1

I was struggling with the same error. The solution for me was to remove the

"declaration": true

from tsconfig.json or to set it to false.

0

How to create a function that return a class.


Including static functions!!!

I have used generics to make sure every implementation of the factory has a different outcome but nothing is stopping you from just have an if/else statement inside your factory function

type Animal = {
    kind: string,
    age: number,
}

type AnimalFactory<T extends Animal> = {
    new(): {
        sayAge: () => number;
    },
    validate: (obj: Record<string, unknown>) => obj is T;
}

function AnimalFactory<T extends Animal>(Base: T): AnimalFactory<T> {
    return class Animal {

        sayAge(): number {
            return Base.age;
        }

        static validate(obj: Record<string, unknown>): obj is T {
            return 'kind' in obj
        }
    }
}

const Dog = AnimalFactory({ kind: 'dog', age: 20 })
const dog = new Dog();
1
  • Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Jan 26 at 15:11
-4

Are you looking for returning Type of class from the function? Below is one code snippet how we can implement factory in TypeScript similar to in other languages.

    class Greeter {
    greeting: string;
    constructor(message: string) {
        this.greeting = message;
    }
    greet() {
        return "Hello, " + this.greeting;
    }
}
class Factory{
    getObject(msg:string): Greeter {
        return new Greeter(msg);
    }
}
var greeter = new Factory().getObject("Hi");
console.log(greeter.greet());

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.