57

I would like to be able to query whether or not a service is running from a windows batch file. I know I can use:

sc query "ServiceName"

but, this dumps out some text. What I really want is for it to set the errorlevel environment variable so that I can take action on that.

Do you know a simple way I can do this?

UPDATE
Thanks for the answers so far. I'm worried the solutions that parse the text may not work on non English operating systems. Does anybody know a way around this, or am I going to have to bite the bullet and write a console program to get this right.

  • 1
    I just tested on a China locale Chinese Language Windows 7 laptop, the "sc query ..." command output are still English. – wangf Aug 31 '15 at 7:15
  • To get service state that will be easy to parse by script no matter what OS language is used I have used WMIC Service WHERE "Name = 'SericeName'" GET Started /format:list. It produces State=Running - easy to parse by regexp and always in English. – Michał Maciej Gałuszka Feb 19 '18 at 8:22

14 Answers 14

83
sc query "ServiceName" | find "RUNNING"
| improve this answer | |
  • @ShaiAlon, it was powershell that it did not work. It worked on the usual command prompt (cmd.exe). – Chris Voon Aug 4 '16 at 9:00
  • It does not work on powershell because sc is an alias to Set-Content. – Chris Voon Aug 4 '16 at 9:01
  • 5
    sc.exe query "ServiceName" | findstr RUNNING will work within Powershell. – Chris Voon Aug 4 '16 at 9:07
  • is there a way to use regex search while looking for a particular service name? Sometimes I maynot remember exactly what the name is but I would know parts of the name.. – alpha_989 Mar 11 '18 at 18:53
  • 1
    If the task is to start a service in case it is not running, then testing for the STOPPED status is much safer, for the service may also be in one of the transitory states STARTING and STOPPING, when it is best left alone. – Ant_222 Aug 31 '18 at 16:11
16

Let's go back to the old school of batch programing on windows

net start | find "Service Name"

This will work everywhere...

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  • errorlevel is 1 both when the service exists or not. So I can't use "find". (Win 7 Pro 64 bit) – Mogens Beltoft Oct 8 '14 at 6:32
  • @RealHowTo, I am running "MobaSSH", and if I open the "Services" app from Control panel, I can check that "MobaSSH" is working. Further, the command you mentioned, net start | find "MobaSSH" also prints out "MobaSSH", indiciating that this command works. However, if I use the sc query "MobaSSH" | find "RUNNING" command, it shows an error saying "EnumQueryServicesStatus: Open Service Failed 1060". Any idea why these 2 commands are showing different results? – alpha_989 Mar 11 '18 at 16:57
  • When I use default Windows services such as "Fax", both commands give similar results. Also sc query does work.. but its not working for "MobaSSH". is there something special about a service initiated by an external program? – alpha_989 Mar 11 '18 at 16:58
  • Isn't net start the command to start a service? The question is to check if the service is running, not start it – trees_are_great Jun 6 '19 at 10:11
8

if you don't mind to combine the net command with grep you can use the following script.

@echo off
net start | grep -x "Service"
if %ERRORLEVEL% == 2 goto trouble
if %ERRORLEVEL% == 1 goto stopped
if %ERRORLEVEL% == 0 goto started
echo unknown status
goto end
:trouble
echo trouble
goto end
:started
echo started
goto end
:stopped
echo stopped
goto end
:end
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I don't seem to have grep on my system. Did you download it from somewhere, if so, where? – Scott Langham Dec 9 '08 at 16:04
  • 3
    I've used something like this, but with a 'find' instead of a 'grep' because I don't want to have to rely on installing anything else. – Scott Langham Dec 9 '08 at 18:50
  • @ScottLangham Does find have regex searching capability? – alpha_989 Mar 11 '18 at 16:51
  • 2
    @alpha_989 No. If you're on windows, start command prompt and type "find /?" to see the help for it. – Scott Langham Mar 12 '18 at 16:46
6

You could use wmic with the /locale option

call wmic /locale:ms_409 service where (name="wsearch") get state /value | findstr State=Running
if %ErrorLevel% EQU 0 (
    echo Running
) else (
    echo Not running
)
| improve this answer | |
4

Thinking a little bit outside the box here I'm going to propose that powershell may be an answer on up-to-date XP/2003 machines and certainly on Vista/2008 and newer (instead of .bat/.cmd). Anyone who has some Perl in their background should feel at-home pretty quickly.


$serviceName = "ServiceName";
$serviceStatus = (get-service "$serviceName").Status;

if ($serviceStatus -eq "Running") {
    echo "Service is Running";
}
else {
    #Could be Stopped, Stopping, Paused, or even Starting...
    echo "Service is $serviceStatus";
}

Another way, if you have significant investment in batch is to run the PS script as a one-liner, returning an exit code.


@ECHO off
SET PS=powershell -nologo -command
%PS% "& {if((get-service SvcName).Status -eq 'Running'){exit 1}}"

ECHO.%ERRORLEVEL%

Running as a one-liner also gets around the default PS code signing policy at the expense of messiness. To put the PS commands in a .ps1 file and run like powershell myCode.ps1 you may find signing your powershell scripts is neccessary to run them in an automated way (depends on your environment). See http://www.hanselman.com/blog/SigningPowerShellScripts.aspx for details

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4
@ECHO OFF
REM testing at cmd : sc query "MSSQLSERVER" | findstr RUNNING
REM "MSSQLSERVER" is the name of Service for sample
sc query "MSSQLSERVER" %1 | findstr RUNNING
if %ERRORLEVEL% == 2 goto trouble
if %ERRORLEVEL% == 1 goto stopped
if %ERRORLEVEL% == 0 goto started
echo unknown status
goto end
:trouble
echo Oh noooo.. trouble mas bro
goto end
:started
echo "SQL Server (MSSQLSERVER)" is started
goto end
:stopped
echo "SQL Server (MSSQLSERVER)" is stopped
echo Starting service
net start "MSSQLSERVER"
goto end
:erro
echo Error please check your command.. mas bro 
goto end

:end
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  • Add some explanation with answer for how this answer help OP in fixing current issue – ρяσѕρєя K Dec 23 '16 at 3:08
3

I would suggest WMIC Service WHERE "Name = 'SericeName'" GET Started

or WMIC Service WHERE "Name = 'ServiceName'" GET ProcessId (ProcessId will be zero if service isn't started)

You can set the error level based on whether the former returns "TRUE" or the latter returns nonzero

| improve this answer | |
  • This is actually the only way to get service state that will always return value in English no matter what is the OS language. – Michał Maciej Gałuszka Feb 19 '18 at 8:12
2

Try

sc query state= all 

for a list of services and whether they are running or not.

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2
sc query "servicename" | findstr STATE

for example:

sc query "wuauserv" | findstr STATE

To report what the Windows update service is doing, running/paused etc.
This is also for Windows 10. Thank me later.

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1

I've found this:

  sc query "ServiceName" | findstr RUNNING  

seems to do roughly the right thing. But, I'm worried that's not generalized enough to work on non-english operating systems.

| improve this answer | |
  • If you really need to do i18n, you should write an app which queries and sets the errorlevel. – hometoast Dec 9 '08 at 15:49
  • how to access the answer of the command sc query "ServiceName" | findstr RUNNING so with conditional statements i can do some processing – Prabhat Mishra Jun 13 '18 at 7:02
1

Just to add on to the list if you are using Powershell.

sc.exe query "ServiceName" | findstr RUNNING

The command below does not work because sc is an alias to Set-Content within Powershell.

sc query "ServiceName" | findstr RUNNING

find also does not work on Powershell for some reason unknown to me.

sc.exe query "ServiceName" | find RUNNING
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0
SERVICO.BAT
@echo off
echo Servico: %1
if "%1"=="" goto erro
sc query %1 | findstr RUNNING
if %ERRORLEVEL% == 2 goto trouble
if %ERRORLEVEL% == 1 goto stopped
if %ERRORLEVEL% == 0 goto started
echo unknown status
goto end
:trouble
echo trouble
goto end
:started
echo started
goto end
:stopped
echo stopped
goto end
:erro
echo sintaxe: servico NOMESERVICO
goto end

:end
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0

Use Cygwin Bash with:

sc query "SomeService" |grep -qo RUNNING && echo "SomeService is running." || echo "SomeService is not running!"

(Make sure you have sc.exe in your PATH.)

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0

I noticed no one mentioned the use of regular expressions when using find/findstr-based Answers. That can be problematic for similarly named services.

Lets say you have two services, CDPUserSvc and CDPUserSvc_54530

If you use most of the find/findstr-based Answers here so far, you'll get false-positives for CDPUserSvc queries when only CDPUserSvc_54530 is running.

The /r and /c switches for findstr can help us handle that use-case, as well as the special character that indicates the end of the line, $

This query will only verify the running of the CDPUserSvc service and ignore CDPUserSvc_54530

sc query|findstr /r /c:"CDPUserSvc$"

| improve this answer | |

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