2

I am new to java and not very familiar with looping quite yet.

I have an assignment question, and in the program there are already 3 strings (s,t,w) created inside main. I have to write a statement or statements, to be added to main, that will determine if the three strings have the same length. If they do, my code should print "yes". If not, my code should print "no".

I have tried entering the following code:

for(int j = 0; j < s.length(); j++){
    if (s.charAt(j) = t.charAt(j) = w.charAt(j))
        System.out.println("yes");
    else 
    {
        System.out.println("no");
    }
}

But I get this error:

compilation error (line 2, column 15) : unexpected type    

I don't understand what this error means? And more importantly, why is the code I wrote incorrect? Do I need an && operator?

Any help/tips for dealing with problems like this would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

  • 1
    Why the loop? Strings have a length() method, which you are already using? – dhke Feb 10 '16 at 20:17
  • 4
    You're using = rather than ==. And you should probably use an && operator. And it's really unclear why you're looping in the first place. Also this will crash if t or w are shorter than s. Also you're effectively comparing content rather than length. – CollinD Feb 10 '16 at 20:17
  • dhke, I just have to use the loop for practice as part of my assignment. The strings were already declared by the homework program I am working off of. – Nathan Feb 10 '16 at 20:19
  • CollinD, thank you. I forgot that the == operator had to be used instead of the = operator. It did not work when I did not have the && symbol, but did work when I added it. Why is this exactly? – Nathan Feb 10 '16 at 20:21
  • Math , and-then is in java && as is , or-else, ||. – Joop Eggen Feb 10 '16 at 20:22
6

Your error is that in conditionals you must return a Boolean value, so isn't =, use instead == (which means it is a comparison).

The = symbol means assignment, like this:

int x = 3; //x <- 3

That defines the variable x and stores the value 3 on it.

Try this also

if(s.length() == w.length() && w.length() == t.length())
{

  System.out.println("yes");
}
else
{
    System.out.println("no");
}
  • Thanks Horazio, this is exactly what I tried and it worked perfectly. My biggest issue was coming from that I forgot that the == operator and the = operator were not the same. – Nathan Feb 10 '16 at 20:25
  • @Nathan You're welcome, It is a normal issue for beginners so keep training! – Horacio Garza Feb 10 '16 at 20:31
1

Whatever Horacio wrote is absolutely correct, and there is no real need for a loop. you might need a loop to compare the strings manually letter by letter to see if they're the same which is looking more like what you were trying to do by using the charAt method( with a double assignment = instead of equals ==) Truth be told there's a much easier way to compare string values(not refernces) with the method equals like so.

boolean areThreeStringsEqual(String a, String b, String c)
{
    return a.equals(b)&& b.equals(c);
}

but for the sake of your assignment you can just do

for(int j = 0; j < s.length(); j++)
{
  if (s.charAt(j) == t.charAt(j)&& t.charAt(j) == w.charAt(j)
    System.out.println("yes");
  else 
    System.out.println("no");
}

the problem with this code is what happens if the strings are of different lengths. if t is shorter than s you'll get a run time error because you exceeded array bounds. To avoid such an error, you can compare the lengths of the three strings and run the loop with this conditionj < somestring.length() when somestring symbolized the shortest of the three.

  • Thank you Ilan, this makes a lot of sense as well. – Nathan Feb 10 '16 at 20:57
  • For the more experts: I know Array Index out of Bounds is an Exception and not an Error... but I'm pretty sure OP hasn't gotten to the differences yet so please don't downvote me on this – Ilan Kutsman Feb 10 '16 at 20:59
0

That error simply means the problem is on the second line of the class. Yes, you need ampersands. Also, use == when testing for equality. Your desired implementation is unclear since your state you want to compare based on length but in your code, it looks like you're trying to compare equality of characters. Since one answer already solves the length problem, this one solves character equality.

for(int j = 0; j < s.length(); j++)  
{   
    // Find out the char value at index j of an arbitrary string.
    char c = s.charAt(j);

    // If the char at index j of ALL strings is the same as c:
    if ((s.charAt(j) == c)&&(t.charAt(j) == c)&&(w.charAt(j) == c))
    {
        System.out.println("yes");
    }
    else 
    {
        System.out.println("no");
    }
}
  • Great, this makes a lot of sense. Thank you. – Nathan Feb 10 '16 at 20:29
0

You need to use == instead of =, as = i used in giving variables a value. ==, on the other hand, is used to compare. Also, you do indeed need an && operator, as

if(s.charAt(j) == t.charAt(j) == w.charAt(j))
    {

    }

tells Java to see if the char s.charAt(j) equals the boolean which checks whether t.charAt(j) equals w.charAt(j)

Here is the if-statement you'll want instead:

if(s.charAt(j) == t.charAt(j) && s.charAt(j) == w.charAt(j))
    {
        System.out.println("yes")
    }
else
    {
        System.out.println("no")
    }
  • Thank you for the help – Nathan Feb 10 '16 at 20:33
  • @HoracioGarza Wait, what's wrong about it? It worked fine for me? – Koen Feb 10 '16 at 20:38

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