192

AngularJS has the & parameters where you could pass a callback to a directive (e.g AngularJS way of callbacks. Is it possible to pass a callback as an @Input for an Angular Component (something like below)? If not what would be the closest thing to what AngularJS does?

@Component({
    selector: 'suggestion-menu',
    providers: [SuggestService],
    template: `
    <div (mousedown)="suggestionWasClicked(suggestion)">
    </div>`,
    changeDetection: ChangeDetectionStrategy.Default
})
export class SuggestionMenuComponent {
    @Input() callback: Function;

    suggestionWasClicked(clickedEntry: SomeModel): void {
        this.callback(clickedEntry, this.query);
    }
}


<suggestion-menu callback="insertSuggestion">
</suggestion-menu>
  • 6
    for future readers @Input way suggested made my code spagetti and not easy to maintain.. @Outputs are a much more natural way of doing what I want. As a result I changed the accepted answer – Michail Michailidis Nov 20 '16 at 8:04
  • @IanS question is about how something is done in Angular similar to AngularJS? why is title misleading? – Michail Michailidis Jul 15 '19 at 12:33
  • Angular is very different from AngularJS. Angular 2+ is just Angular. – Ian S Jul 16 '19 at 14:31
  • 1
    Fixed your title ;) – Ian S Jul 19 '19 at 9:50
  • 1
    @IanS Thanks! now the question is about angularJs too though - with the tag you added though. – Michail Michailidis Jul 19 '19 at 10:32
262

I think that is a bad solution. If you want to pass a Function into component with @Input(), @Output() decorator is what you are looking for.

export class SuggestionMenuComponent {
    @Output() onSuggest: EventEmitter<any> = new EventEmitter();

    suggestionWasClicked(clickedEntry: SomeModel): void {
        this.onSuggest.emit([clickedEntry, this.query]);
    }
}

<suggestion-menu (onSuggest)="insertSuggestion($event[0],$event[1])">
</suggestion-menu>
  • 38
    To be precise you're not passing the function but rather hooking up an listener event listener to the output. Helpful for understanding why it works. – Jens Nov 6 '16 at 20:24
  • 13
    This is a great method, but I was left with a lot of questions after reading this answer. I was hoping it would be more in-depth or have a link provided describing @Output and EventEmitter. So, here is the Angular documentation for @Output for those interested. – WebWanderer Jan 19 '17 at 18:33
  • 5
    This is fine for one-way binding. You can hookup to the child's event. But you can't pass a callback function to the child and let it analyze the callback's return value. The answer below allows that. – rook Feb 20 '17 at 7:44
  • 3
    I would expect to have more explanation on why to prefer one way vs another instead of having "I think that is a bad solution.". – Fidan Hakaj Jun 16 '17 at 13:42
  • 6
    Probably good for 80% of cases, but not when a child component wants visualization conditional on whether a callback exists. – John Freeman Apr 11 '18 at 1:43
105

UPDATE

This answer was submitted when Angular 2 was still in alpha and many of the features were unavailable / undocumented. While the below will still work, this method is now entirely outdated. I strongly recommend the accepted answer over the below.

Original Answer

Yes in fact it is, however you will want to make sure that it is scoped correctly. For this I've used a property to ensure that this means what I want it to.

@Component({
  ...
  template: '<child [myCallback]="theBoundCallback"></child>',
  directives: [ChildComponent]
})
export class ParentComponent{
  public theBoundCallback: Function;

  public ngOnInit(){
    this.theBoundCallback = this.theCallback.bind(this);
  }

  public theCallback(){
    ...
  }
}

@Component({...})
export class ChildComponent{
  //This will be bound to the ParentComponent.theCallback
  @Input()
  public myCallback: Function; 
  ...
}
  • 1
    This worked! Thanks! I wish the documentation had that somewhere :) – Michail Michailidis Feb 11 '16 at 1:26
  • 1
    You could use a static method if you would like, but then you would not have access to any of the instance members of the component. So probably not your use case. But yes, you would need to pass that as well from Parent -> Child – SnareChops Feb 11 '16 at 2:49
  • 3
    Great answer! I typically don't rename the function when binding though. in ngOnInit I would just use: this.theCallback = this.theCallback.bind(this) and then you can pass along theCallback instead of theBoundCallback. – Zack May 11 '16 at 21:26
  • 1
    @MichailMichailidis Yes, I agree with your solution and have updated my answer with a note to lead people to the better way. Thanks for keeping an eye on this one. – SnareChops Nov 21 '16 at 5:09
  • 7
    @Output and EventEmitter are fine for one way binding. You can hookup to the child's event but you can't pass a callback function to the child and let it analyze the callback's return value. This answer allows that. – rook Feb 20 '17 at 7:46
27

An alternative to the answer SnareChops gave.

You can use .bind(this) in your template to have the same effect. It may not be as clean but it saves a couple of lines. I'm currently on angular 2.4.0

@Component({
  ...
  template: '<child [myCallback]="theCallback.bind(this)"></child>',
  directives: [ChildComponent]
})
export class ParentComponent {

  public theCallback(){
    ...
  }
}

@Component({...})
export class ChildComponent{
  //This will be bound to the ParentComponent.theCallback
  @Input()
  public myCallback: Function; 
  ...
}
  • 2
    as others have commented bind(this) in the template is nowhere documented so it might become deprecated/unsupported in the future. Plus again @Input is causing the code to become spaghetti and using @Output results in a more natural/untangled process – Michail Michailidis Apr 1 '17 at 16:25
  • 1
    When you place bind() in the template, Angular re-evaluates this expression at every change detection. The other solution - doing the bind outside of the template - is less concise, but it doesn't have this problem. – Chris Oct 31 '18 at 1:53
  • question: when doing .bind(this), you are binding method theCallBack with the child or parent? I think it's with the child. But the thing is, when the bind is being called, it's always the child calling it, so this bind doesn't seem necessary if I am correct. – ChrisZ Jan 30 '19 at 19:33
  • It binds with the parent component. The reason this is done is that when theCallBack() is being called, it will probably want to do something inside itself, and if "this" is not the parent component it will be out of context and therefore cannot reach his own methods and variables anymore. – Max Fahl Feb 1 '19 at 8:09
16

In some cases, you might need business logic to be performed by a parent component. In the example below we have a child component that renders table row depending on the logic provided by the parent component:

@Component({
  ...
  template: '<table-component [getRowColor]="getColor"></table-component>',
  directives: [TableComponent]
})
export class ParentComponent {

 // Pay attention on the way this function is declared. Using fat arrow (=>) declaration 
 // we can 'fixate' the context of `getColor` function
 // so that it is bound to ParentComponent as if .bind(this) was used.
 getColor = (row: Row) => {
    return this.fancyColorService.getUserFavoriteColor(row);
 }

}

@Component({...})
export class TableComponent{
  // This will be bound to the ParentComponent.getColor. 
  // I found this way of declaration a bit safer and convenient than just raw Function declaration
  @Input('getRowColor') getRowColor: (row: Row) => Color;

  renderRow(){
    ....
    // Notice that `getRowColor` function holds parent's context because of a fat arrow function used in the parent
    const color = this.getRowColor(row);
    renderRow(row, color);
  }
}

So, I wanted to demonstrate 2 things here:

  1. Fat arrow (=>) functions instead of .bind(this) to hold the right context;
  2. Typesafe declaration of a callback function in the child component.
  • Great explanation for the use of the fat arrow to replace use of .bind(this) – TYMG Feb 7 '19 at 19:08
  • 1
    Usage tip: Make sure to put [getRowColor]="getColor" and not [getRowColor]="getColor()" ;-) – Simon_Weaver Apr 21 '19 at 20:29
5

As an example, I am using a login modal window, where the modal window is the parent, the login form is the child and the login button calls back to the modal parent's close function.

The parent modal contains the function to close the modal. This parent passes the close function to the login child component.

import { Component} from '@angular/core';
import { LoginFormComponent } from './login-form.component'

@Component({
  selector: 'my-modal',
  template: `<modal #modal>
      <login-form (onClose)="onClose($event)" ></login-form>
    </modal>`
})
export class ParentModalComponent {
  modal: {...};

  onClose() {
    this.modal.close();
  }
}

After the child login component submits the login form, it closes the parent modal using the parent's callback function

import { Component, EventEmitter, Output } from '@angular/core';

@Component({
  selector: 'login-form',
  template: `<form (ngSubmit)="onSubmit()" #loginForm="ngForm">
      <button type="submit">Submit</button>
    </form>`
})
export class ChildLoginComponent {
  @Output() onClose = new EventEmitter();
  submitted = false;

  onSubmit() {
    this.onClose.emit();
    this.submitted = true;
  }
}
4

Passing method with argument, using .bind inside template

@Component({
  ...
  template: '<child [action]="foo.bind(this, 'someArgument')"></child>',
  ...
})
export class ParentComponent {
  public foo(someParameter: string){
    ...
  }
}

@Component({...})
export class ChildComponent{

  @Input()
  public action: Function; 

  ...
}
1

An alternative to the answer Max Fahl gave.

You can define callback function as an arrow function in the parent component so that you won't need to bind that.

@Component({
  ...
  // unlike this, template: '<child [myCallback]="theCallback.bind(this)"></child>',
  template: '<child [myCallback]="theCallback"></child>',
  directives: [ChildComponent]
})
export class ParentComponent {

   // unlike this, public theCallback(){
   public theCallback = () => {
    ...
  }
}

@Component({...})
export class ChildComponent{
  //This will be bound to the ParentComponent.theCallback
  @Input()
  public myCallback: Function; 
  ...
}

0

Use Observable pattern. You can put Observable value (not Subject) into Input parameter and manage it from parent component. You do not need callback function.

See example: https://stackoverflow.com/a/49662611/4604351

  • can you please illustrate it with a working example? – Michail Michailidis Nov 25 '19 at 10:10
-3

The current answer can be simplified to...

@Component({
  ...
  template: '<child [myCallback]="theCallback"></child>',
  directives: [ChildComponent]
})
export class ParentComponent{
  public theCallback(){
    ...
  }
}

@Component({...})
export class ChildComponent{
  //This will be bound to the ParentComponent.theCallback
  @Input()
  public myCallback: Function; 
  ...
}
  • so there is no need to bind explicitly? – Michail Michailidis Mar 23 '16 at 18:46
  • 3
    Without the .bind(this) then the this inside of the callback will be window which may not matter depending on your use case. However if you have this in the callback at all, then .bind(this) is necessary. If you don't then this simplified version is the way to go. – SnareChops Mar 23 '16 at 23:40
  • 3
    I recommend always bind the callback with the component, because eventually you will use this inside the callback function. It's just error prone. – Alexandre Junges Aug 5 '16 at 12:50
  • That's an example of an Angular 2 antipattern. – Serginho Oct 14 '16 at 17:45
  • It does not have to be an anti-pattern. There are cases where you want exactly this. It's not that uncommon to want to tell the component HOW to do something that's not about the view. It makes sense and I don't see why this answer is getting so much hate. – Lazar Ljubenović Jan 17 '18 at 10:00

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