18

Is there an efficiency difference between using and in an if statement and using multiple if statements? In other words, is something like

if expr1 == expr2 and expr3==expr4:
  dostuff()

different from an efficiency standpoint then:

if expr1 == expr2:
  if expr3 == expr4:
    dostuff()

My very basic testing does not reveal a difference, but does someone with more knowledge (or at least more thorough testing) have a definitive answer?

4
  • 1
    stackoverflow.com/questions/2539116/… might be related. – anijhaw Aug 20 '10 at 17:34
  • 1
    I don't know of any differences with efficiency, but what should be more important is the readability of your code. If it's clearer to use multiple nested if statements, then do what you think makes sense. – derekerdmann Aug 20 '10 at 17:34
  • 1
    You should look at this in the disassembler if you really want to know what's going on, but the first expression is just as fast (potentially faster, but probably not optimized in that way) because Python uses short-circuit evaluation. – Nick Bastin Aug 20 '10 at 17:37
  • @NickBastin since the operator is and, how would short-circuiting make any difference between both the approaches? In the case of nested if as well, if the first condition is false, the other will not be checked. Same happens with short-circuiting. – Astitva Srivastava Jan 31 '20 at 9:55
6

In either case, expr1 == expr2 evaluates to false in if, the second will not be evaluated.

14

This isn't enough of a performance difference, if any, to affect your decision. IMO, the decision here should be made purely from a readability perspective. The first is generally more standard, I think, but there are situations when the second might be clearer. Choose the method that best gets your intent across.

2
  • 1
    s/IMO//. It's absolutely insane to choose one of these over the other for performance reasons, in pretty much any language. There is no way to quantify which will be faster, the implementation can do what it wants. – L̲̳o̲̳̳n̲̳̳g̲̳̳p̲̳o̲̳̳k̲̳̳e̲̳̳ Aug 20 '10 at 18:08
  • 2
    Thanks. Generally, I agree and I focus on readability over efficiency. But in this particular case, the if is in a loop being executed a sizable number of times and I have a requirement to reduce the runtime so, at least this time it might matter. – TimothyAWiseman Aug 20 '10 at 19:37
13

Any differences in speed between using and and nested ifs will be minimal. You are barking up the wrong tree. Consider this tree:

if oftenTrueCondition and rarelyTrueCondition:

compared with

if rarelyTrueCondition and oftenTrueCondition:

So, unless the first condition must be evaluated first (it is a guard to stop the next expression from crashing or doing something silly/expensive), consider swapping the order of evaluation.

1
  • A very useful way to think about this that I hadn't considered, and actually will come in handy in numerical work. Thanks! – spencer nelson Aug 21 '10 at 1:03
5

When in doubt, you can check what does python compile your statements in, using dis module:

>>> import dis
>>> def test1():
...     if expr1 == expr2 and expr3==expr4:
...        dostuff()
... 
>>> def test2():
...     if expr1 == expr2:
...        if expr3 == expr4:
...           dostuff()
... 
>>> dis.dis(test1)
  2           0 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (expr1)
              3 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (expr2)
              6 COMPARE_OP               2 (==)
              9 JUMP_IF_FALSE           24 (to 36)
             12 POP_TOP             
             13 LOAD_GLOBAL              2 (expr3)
             16 LOAD_GLOBAL              3 (expr4)
             19 COMPARE_OP               2 (==)
             22 JUMP_IF_FALSE           11 (to 36)
             25 POP_TOP             

  3          26 LOAD_GLOBAL              4 (dostuff)
             29 CALL_FUNCTION            0
             32 POP_TOP             
             33 JUMP_FORWARD             1 (to 37)
        >>   36 POP_TOP             
        >>   37 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             40 RETURN_VALUE        
>>> dis.dis(test2)
  2           0 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (expr1)
              3 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (expr2)
              6 COMPARE_OP               2 (==)
              9 JUMP_IF_FALSE           28 (to 40)
             12 POP_TOP             

  3          13 LOAD_GLOBAL              2 (expr3)
             16 LOAD_GLOBAL              3 (expr4)
             19 COMPARE_OP               2 (==)
             22 JUMP_IF_FALSE           11 (to 36)
             25 POP_TOP             

  4          26 LOAD_GLOBAL              4 (dostuff)
             29 CALL_FUNCTION            0
             32 POP_TOP             
             33 JUMP_ABSOLUTE           41
        >>   36 POP_TOP             
             37 JUMP_FORWARD             1 (to 41)
        >>   40 POP_TOP             
        >>   41 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             44 RETURN_VALUE        

So as you can see, at python bytecode level, both statements are same - even while you use single if at first statement, it will do JUMP_IF_FALSE after first comparison.

2

The first one (one if with and) is faster :-)

I tried it out using timeit. These are the results:

Variant 1: 9.82836714316
Variant 2: 9.83886494559
Variant 1 (True): 9.66493159804
Variant 2 (True): 10.0392633241

For the last two, the first comparision is True, so the second one is skipped. Interesting results.


import timeit


print "Variant 1: %s" % timeit.timeit("""
for i in xrange(1000):
    if i == 2*i and i == 3*i:
        pass
        """,
        number = 1000)

print "Variant 2: %s" % timeit.timeit("""
for i in xrange(1000):
    if i == 2*i:
        if i == 3*i:
            pass
        """,
        number = 1000)

print "Variant 1 (True): %s" % timeit.timeit("""
for i in xrange(1000):
    if i == i and i == 3*i:
        pass
        """,
        number = 1000)

print "Variant 2 (True): %s" % timeit.timeit("""
for i in xrange(1000):
    if i == i:
        if i == 3*i:
            pass
        """,
        number = 1000)

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