2

A person has an ID. A student has a student's ID. A driver has a driver's license.

  • A person attends a school and becomes a student.
  • A student graduates and becomes an ordinary person.
  • A person gets a driver's license and becomes a driver.
  • A student gets a driver's license and becomes a driver.

Are those things just state change like in the following example:

class Person {
    ID id;
    StudentID stId;
    DriverLicense license;

    void drive() {
        if(license == null) //illegal state exception
        //drive
    }

    //bla bla
}

Or is there inheritance? Since an object is data+behavior, new data and being able to do new things should warrant a new object

class Student extends Person {
    //
}

class Driver extends Person {
    //
}

//things get messy here, in Java you can't extend multiple class
//what if there's a rule that, student drivers can request/get a tax reduction?
class DriverStudent extends Person, Driver {
    //
}

PLUS, more importantly, how does one become the other? Through methods or constructors or 3rd classes(like a service or aggregate) ?

class Person {
    Driver getADriversLicense() {
        //create and return a Driver
        //this person still exists but now there's a driver with this person's data
    }
}

or:

class Driver extends Person {
    public Driver(Person p) {
        //constructor
    }
}

or:

class Aggregate {
    Driver giveDriversLicense(Person p) {
        // access internal state of both objects(ditch encapsulation) and return a driver?
        // put aggregate in same package with Driver and Person and use package private methods to provide encapsulation?
    }
}
8
  • Inheritance is the right way. On the other hand, in your second question, the first case and the second may be compatibles: inside getADriversLicense call new Driver(this) that is the constructor of the second case.
    – Héctor
    Feb 11, 2016 at 15:50
  • Does this compile: class DriverStudent extends Person, Driver {? Feb 11, 2016 at 15:51
  • 3
    You could always use the decorator pattern to transform from one class to another. Feb 11, 2016 at 15:52
  • @HovercraftFullOfEels of course it won't compile. But what if there's a method requiring a person who is both a student and a driver?
    – uylmz
    Feb 11, 2016 at 15:52
  • @ctst: I am pretty sure that was sarcasm/hypothetical... to get OP to think. Feb 11, 2016 at 15:53

4 Answers 4

5

A better way to see such relationship is through roles i.e. a Person can play multiple roles .

How about a scenario where a Person can be a Driver and a Student and may be an Employee too ?

So IMO its best represented as following -

class Person{

     List<Role> currentRoles ; 

     List<Role> getCurrentRoles(){ 
         return currentRoles ; 
     }

     public void addRole(Role role){
          currentRoles.add(role) ; // so on
     }  
}

Using generics and type safe casts you can easily retrieve a specific role and invoke a related operation on it.

public interface DriverRole implements Role {

    License getDriversLicense() ;
} 

Edit : Taking it further to answer your question fully it easily addresses a scenario where Person gains or loses a Role i.e. add or remove a Role. As pointed out in the comment here this relationship is best represented through Has <0..M> relationship then IS - kind of relationship.

Edit 1 In comparison when you use a Decorator pattern your origin gets wrapped and too many decorators can create a aggregation chain which IMO is not an ideal scenario or alternatively it will result in a decorator inheritance chain which is not to my liking.

Having said that depending on a specific scenario one particular pattern might fit better then the other though in the example you have given I think a simple aggregation of Roles is best.

7
  • 1
    Exactly what I was thinking. The OP's situation is better modeled by a HAS-A relationship rather than an IS-A relationship.
    – Tophandour
    Feb 11, 2016 at 15:55
  • Since this aligns well with a security framework such as spring security (a person having a role can do something specific), I like this even more. Let me investigate a bit to see if there's a case this won't suffice.
    – uylmz
    Feb 11, 2016 at 16:00
  • @Reek I use Guice a lot and not so much of Spring but yes in general the pattern I described is ideal for granular configurations. Also specifics of a particular Role can be easily implemented by an Role implementation class. And I am confident in Spring you can weave aspects around it to achieve granular control around it
    – Gautam
    Feb 11, 2016 at 16:03
  • Who holds a DriverLicense field and implements DriverRole in this approach? Where is the concrete data and behavior implemented?
    – uylmz
    Feb 11, 2016 at 16:11
  • 1
    @Reek I came across an interesting scenario related to your point recently. since we rely a lot on code instrumentation we developed a generic object referral mechanism to address this with custom rules that trigger when a reference changes. Can't really share the code but I hope you get a general idea.
    – Gautam
    Mar 31, 2017 at 5:13
3

Inheritance is one way to think of these relationships but this only practically makes sense when it's reasonable to enumerate the number of combinations of statuses the person might have.

Another to think of this without constraining yourself through inheritance is to think of everyone as people with different credentials.

Rather than a person being a driver, think of everyone as a generic Person having a set of credentials. eg. a drivers license, and also having a student ID. Then you can represent all of these different credentials that a person may have through a Credentials class (which Driver, Student, etc) extend. A person may have a List which you can use to perform any case based logic that you might want.

0

As you mentioned, consider using inheritance to approach this problem. Each Student and each Driver are both considered a Person. Therefore, both Student and Driver should inherit functionality from the parent class, Person. As far as whether someone is a student, driver, both, or just an "ordinary person" should simply be stored in a variable.

public class Person
{
    private int id;
    private String type;

    public Person(int id, String type)
    {
        this.id = id;
        this.type = type;
    }

    public int GetID()
    {
        // Using *this* keyword for consistency, but not necessary here.
        return this.id;
    }

    public void SetID(int id)
    {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String GetType()
    {
        // Using *this* keyword for consistency, but not necessary here.
        return this.type;
    }

    public void SetType(String type)
    {
        this.type = type;
    }
}

public class Student extends Person
{
    super(int id, String type);
}

public class Driver extends Person
{
    super(int id, String type);
}

public class Main
{
    public static void main(String [] args)
    {
        Student sam = new Student(342918293, "student"); 
        Driver rosa = new Driver(147284, "driver");
    }
}
-1

I'n not too fond of this being an inheritance, as a Person can be a Driver AND a Student at the same time. Though I don't fully rememeber how the decorator pattern (sugested by Mr. Poliwhirl) works, that may be the correct approach.

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