62
  1. My output is in the format of 290.52262423327 seconds. How can i change this to 00:04:51?

  2. The same output i want to show in seconds and in HH:MM:SS format, so if it is seconds, i want to show only 290.52 seconds.(only two integers after decimal point)? how can i do this?

I am working in php and the output is present in $time variable. want to change this $time into $newtime with HH:MM:SS and $newsec as 290.52.

Thanks :)

4

16 Answers 16

135
function foo($seconds) {
  $t = round($seconds);
  return sprintf('%02d:%02d:%02d', $t/3600, floor($t/60)%60, $t%60);
}

echo foo('290.52262423327'), "\n";
echo foo('9290.52262423327'), "\n";
echo foo(86400+120+6), "\n";

prints

00:04:51
02:34:51
24:02:06
echo round($time, 2);

Update Note:

function foo($seconds) {
  $t = round($seconds);
  // Deprecated: Implicit conversion from float ***.** to int loses precision
  // return sprintf('%02d:%02d:%02d', ($t/3600),($t/60%60), $t%60);

  // return sprintf('%02d:%02d:%02d', $t/3600, ($t%3600)/60, $t%60);
  return sprintf('%02d:%02d:%02d', $t/3600, floor($t/60)%60, $t%60);
}
1
  • I ran into some extreme unsuccessful divisions and subtracting functions trying to achieve what you did in that one line :) sprintf('%02d:%02d:%02d', ($t/3600),($t/60%60), $t%60)
    – adrianTNT
    Dec 19, 2013 at 15:10
26

Try this one

echo gmdate("H:i:s", 90);
3
  • This solution will work for any values less than the number of seconds in a day, but will reset to 00:00:00 for values ≥ 86400.
    – dctucker
    Nov 23, 2016 at 23:35
  • 2
    any idea on how to make it work for values >86400 ?? Jun 28, 2017 at 4:26
  • This is misleading: gmdate() accepts a Unix timestamp as the second argument, so effectively you are getting the "H:i:s" portion 90 seconds after January 1 1970 00:00:00 GMT, of course if you go over the number of seconds in a day (86400), you will be getting the "H:i:s" portion of the next day. Only use this if you are guaranteed to always have less than a day's worth of seconds.
    – Duncanmoo
    Jan 11, 2022 at 11:33
4

For till 23:59:59 hours you can use PHP default function

echo gmdate("H:i:s", 86399);

Which will only return the result till 23:59:59

If your seconds is more then 86399 than with the help of @VolkerK answer

$time = round($seconds);
echo sprintf('%02d:%02d:%02d', ($time/3600),($time/60%60), $time%60);

will be the best options to use ...

4

Edit: A comment pointed out that the previous answer fails if the number of seconds exceeds a day (86400 seconds). Here's an updated version. The OP did not specify this requirement so this may be implemented differently than the OP might expect, and there may be much better answers here already. I just couldn't stand having provided an answer with this bug.

$iSecondsIn = 290.52262423327;

// Account for days.
$iDaysOut = 0;
while ($iSecondsIn >= 86400) {
    $iDaysOut += 1;
    $iSecondsIn -= 86400;
}

// Display number of days if appropriate.
if ($iDaysOut > 0) {
    print $iDaysOut.' days and ';
}

// Print the final product.
print date('H:i:s', mktime(0, 0, $iSecondsIn));

The old version, with the bug:

$iSeconds = 290.52262423327;
print date('H:i:s', mktime(0, 0, $iSeconds));
2
  • This answer is also going to be problematic if your $iSeconds goes over 86399 (the number of seconds in a day). 86401 will give you 00:00:01.
    – Duncanmoo
    Jan 12, 2022 at 12:00
  • Thank you for pointing that out. I've updated the answer accordingly.
    – Teekin
    Mar 20, 2022 at 13:18
3

Based on https://stackoverflow.com/a/3534705/4342230, but adding days:

function durationToString($seconds) {
  $time = round($seconds);

  return sprintf(
    '%02dD:%02dH:%02dM:%02dS',
    $time / 86400,
    ($time / 3600) % 24,
    ($time / 60) % 60,
    $time % 60
  );
}
2

Try this:

$time = 290.52262423327;
echo date("h:i:s", mktime(0,0, round($time) % (24*3600)));
1

I dont know if this is the most efficient way, but if you also need to display days, this works:

function foo($seconds) { 
$t = round($seconds); 
return sprintf('%02d  %02d:%02d:%02d', ($t/86400%24), ($t/3600) -(($t/86400%24)*24),($t/60%60), $t%60);
}
1

Try this :)

private function conversionTempsEnHms($tempsEnSecondes)
    {
        $h = floor($tempsEnSecondes / 3600);
        $reste_secondes = $tempsEnSecondes - $h * 3600;

        $m = floor($reste_secondes / 60);
        $reste_secondes = $reste_secondes - $m * 60;

        $s = round($reste_secondes, 3); 
        $s = number_format($s, 3, '.', '');

        $h = str_pad($h, 2, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT);
        $m = str_pad($m, 2, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT);
        $s = str_pad($s, 6, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT);

        $temps = $h . ":" . $m . ":" . $s;

        return $temps;
    }
1

Personally, going off other peoples answers I made my own parser. Works with days, hours, minutes and seconds. And should be easy to expand to weeks/months etc. It works with deserialisation to c# as well

function secondsToTimeInterval($seconds) {
    $t = round($seconds);
    $days = floor($t/86400);
    $day_sec = $days*86400;
    $hours = floor( ($t-$day_sec) / (60 * 60) );
    $hour_sec = $hours*3600;
    $minutes = floor((($t-$day_sec)-$hour_sec)/60);
    $min_sec = $minutes*60;
    $sec = (($t-$day_sec)-$hour_sec)-$min_sec;
    return sprintf('%02d:%02d:%02d:%02d', $days, $hours, $minutes, $sec);
}
1

Simple formatter with progressively added parts - sample:

  • formatTime(123) => 2m 3s
  • formatTime(7400) => 2h 3m 20s
  • formatTime(999999) => 11d 13h 46m 39s

function formatTime($secs)
{
    $secs = max(0, intval($secs));
    if($secs > 0){
        $out = [];
        $yrs = floor($secs / 31536e3);
        if($yrs){
            $out[] = $yrs."y";
        }
        $rem = $secs - $yrs * 31536e3;
        $days = floor($rem / 86400);
        if($days || $out){
            $out[] = $days."d";
        }
        $rem -= $days * 86400;
        $hrs = floor($rem / 3600);
        if($hrs || $out){
            $out[] = $hrs."h";
        }
        $rem -= $hrs * 3600;
        $min = floor($rem / 60);
        if($min || $out){
            $out[] = $min."m";
        }
        $rem -= $min * 60;
        $out[] = $rem."s";
        return implode(" ", $out);
    }
    return 0;
}
0

1)

$newtime = sprintf( "%02d:%02d:%02d", $time / 3600, $time / 60 % 60, $time % 60 );

2)

$newsec = sprintf( "%.2f", $time );
0

If you're using Carbon (such as in Laravel), you can do this:

$timeFormatted = \Carbon\Carbon::now()->startOfDay()->addSeconds($seconds)->toTimeString();

But $timeFormatted = date("H:i:s", $seconds); is probably good enough.

Just see caveats.

0

Here was my implementation with microseconds

    /**
     * @example 00 d 00 h 00 min 00 sec 005098 ms (0.005098 sec.ms)
     */
    public function __toString()
    {
        // Add your code to get $seconds and $microseconds
        $time = round(($seconds + $microseconds), 6, PHP_ROUND_HALF_UP);

        return sprintf(
            '%02d d %02d h %02d min %02d sec %06d ms (%s sec.ms)',
            $time / 86400,
            ($time / 3600) % 24,
            ($time / 60) % 60,
            $time % 60,
            $time * 1000000 % 1000000,
            $time
        );
    }
0
echo date('H:i:s', round($time)%86400);
-1
echo date('H:i:s',$time);

echo number_format($time,2);
0
-1

Numero uno... http://www.ckorp.net/sec2time.php (use this function)

Numero duo... echo round(290.52262423327,2);

1
  • the link you posted is dead
    – beppe9000
    Dec 20, 2018 at 17:23

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.