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Can someone explain this result?

After setting path, it did not change. This was run in an Administrator command-line:

C:\Windows\system32>setx path "C:\Windows\system32;C:\Windows;C:\Windows\System32\Wbem;C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\;C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\bin;D:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft VS Code\bin"

SUCCESS: Specified value was saved.

C:\Windows\system32>path
PATH=C:\Windows\system32;C:\Windows;C:\Windows\System32\Wbem;C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\;C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\bin;D:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft VS Code\bin;D:\Program Files (x86)\metapad36;D:\Program Files (x86)\metapad36" /M

I've read that %PATH% = PATH variable for machine + PATH variable for user. Am I seeing the machine path + Admin's path?

Have looked at other articles on the topic, but still confused.

Should I clear the user paths, so there's no duplication?

update: Re the tip that "variables created or modified by this tool will be available in future command windows" i open a non-admin window and enter:

>path
PATH=C:\Windows\system32;C:\Windows;C:\Windows\System32\Wbem;C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\;C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\bin;D:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft VS Code\bin;;D:\Program Files (x86)\metapad36;C:\Windows\system32;C:\Windows;C:\Windows\System32\Wbem;C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\;C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\bin;D:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft VS Code\bin

The path is repeated twice. Ok, then at same prompt I setx the path without the repeat, and without /M:

>setx path "C:\Windows\system32;C:\Windows;C:\Windows\System32\Wbem;C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\;C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\bin;D:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft VS Code\bin"

SUCCESS: Specified value was saved.

Apparently saved in current user environment.

Then i open a new non-admin command window, and:

>path
PATH=C:\Windows\system32;C:\Windows;C:\Windows\System32\Wbem;C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\;C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\bin;D:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft VS Code\bin;;D:\Program Files (x86)\metapad36;C:\Windows\system32;C:\Windows;C:\Windows\System32\Wbem;C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\;C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\bin;D:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft VS Code\bin`

It has not changed. Why?

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  • If the "duplication" comes from the system variable, you'll need to setx /M the corrected path too (at an elevated cmd prompt, of course). Changing the user value of path is not going to remove entries that are defined in the system value of path. – dxiv Feb 13 '16 at 22:15
  • It sounds like you're saying that path entered on a non-Admin command-line returns system-wide path, not user-level path. Really? I notice entering path entered on a non-Admin command-line returns different results than path entered on an Admin command-line. But if both cases return system-path, why are they different? thx – johny why Feb 14 '16 at 2:12
  • No, you misunderstood. You only need the elevated prompt in order for setx /M to be allowed to change the system environment variable path. Other than that, the elevated (run-as-admin) and regular (non-elevated) cmd prompts have the same environment. Note that PATH in particular is a combination of system PATH + user PATH, see for example Environment variables in Windows NT: The User path is appended to the system path. If you somehow set both to the same value, the resulting PATH will contain duplicates like you are seeing. – dxiv Feb 14 '16 at 3:09
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In Windows, each process gets a copy of the environment which is essentially a snapshot of the global environment at the time the process was started. Changes to the global environment while the process is running are not propagated back to the process' own copy of the environment.

To answer the actual question, setx does modify the user environment (or the system one if run with /M), but the changes are not immediately visible in the process that executed setx, in this case cmd.exe. If you open a new command prompt after running setx, you'll see the changes in that instance of cmd.exe.

This is explicitly noted in the setx /? help:

On a local system, variables created or modified by this tool will be available in future command windows but not in the current CMD.exe command window.

To effect the same changes in both the global environment, and the one of the current process, you need to run both setx andset.

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