1

I know that in Java you can access a private member of a superclass in the subclass as long as the superclass provides a public or protected getter method. I also know however that the subclass does not actually inherit the private member. Considering the following scenario....

Class A {
    private var = 2;
    protected int getVar(){
        return var;
    }
}

Class B extends A{

   public void printVar(){
       System.out.println(getVar());
   }
}

Class Main{

    public static void main(args []){

         B b= new B();
         b.printVar();
    }
}

I want to understand, since we are creating an instance of the subclass B, what exactly and when is that private member allocated to memory, and what is it's scope? How does it even exist since an instance of A was actually never created? It's not a static variable, or final so is it stack dynamic or implicitly heap dynamic? I thought that when you instantiate a subclass from a super class you inherit the members that aren't private and methods as well and then those get instantiated as part of an object instance of the sub class (unless they're overridden etc), so there is only one object allocated as a heap dynamic variable. But if these private members are not inherited then does the compiler simply provide a stack dynamic reference to them in case the inherited getter method is invoked and only in that case?

2

I also know however that the subclass does not actually inherit the private member.

Yes it does. An instance of B is an instance of A, and it contains all the same fields. You don't have direct access to the private fields anymore, but they still exist.

How does it even exist since an instance of A was actually never created?

When you create B, a constructor in A is called as well, which makes sure that the B instance is correctly initialized as a valid A. Don't think of a subclass as something different than it's superclass. A B is still an A; it just does more.

3

Your assumption that the private members of the super-class are not inherited by the sub-class is wrong. All members are inherited. The private members of the sub-class are part of the sub-class instance, but they can't be accessed directly by the code of the sub-class.

Having a protected getter in the super-class that returns the value of the private member gives the sub-class a means to access the value of the private member (though it can't modify it, unless you also have a protected or public setter in the super-class).

  • according to JLS though .... .or am I misinterpreting this? (docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se5.0/html/classes.html#8.2): Members of a class that are declared private are not inherited by subclasses of that class. Only members of a class that are declared protected or public are inherited by subclasses declared in a package other than the one in which the class is declared. – Loren Shqipognja Feb 11 '16 at 20:24
  • Ah nevermind, After looking at it closer, I undestand what it's saying. – Loren Shqipognja Feb 11 '16 at 20:31
  • @LorenShqipognja I guess it's a matter of interpretation. By "not inherited", the JLS means that private members cannot be accessed by the sub-class. They are still allocated and initialized by the code of the super-class. – Eran Feb 11 '16 at 20:31
  • in the context of my question however your interpretation is the correct one, thank you :) – Loren Shqipognja Feb 11 '16 at 20:45
  • Hi Eran, I think you have a small typo error in your answer. "The private members of the sub-class are part of the sub-class instance" should be "The private members of the super-class are part of the sub-class instance" – Ravindra babu Feb 12 '16 at 11:20

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