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Is there a printf converter to print in binary format?

Consider this small C application

int main () {
    int bits = 100 >> 3;    
    printf("bits => %d", bits);     
    return 0;
}

How can I print the bits variable so I can see it as a binary value (with the bits clearly shifted), e.g. 00001100?

I'm also learning, so feel free to correct any terminology.

marked as duplicate by qrdl, alex, Delan Azabani, dirkgently, Jerry Coffin Aug 21 '10 at 4:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3

This should work (not tested):

#define PRINT_BITS 7

void printbits(int input){
    int i, mask;

    for(i=PRINT_BITS; i >= 0; i--){
       mask = 1 << i;
       if(input & mask){
          printf("1");
       }else{
          printf("0");
       }
    }
 }
  • It indeed does work! :) Thanks – alex Aug 21 '10 at 4:08
2

You have to extract one bit at a time. Something like the following

int main() {
  int bits = 100 >> 3;
  for (int bit = 7; bit >= 0; --bit)
    printf("%d", (number & (1 << bit)) == 1);
  printf("\n");
  return 0;
}
  • 1
    Wouldn’t this print the bits in reverse order? – Timwi Aug 21 '10 at 3:55
  • Would have indeed. Thanks for the catch. Fixed it. – torak Aug 21 '10 at 3:57
2

Experienced programmers will usually print the value out in hex ("%x" in the format string), because there is a simple correspondence between hex digits and each group of four binary bits:

Hex Binary
 0   0000
 1   0001
 2   0010
 3   0011
 4   0100
 5   0101
 6   0110
 7   0111
 8   1000
 9   1001
 A   1010
 B   1011
 C   1100
 D   1101
 E   1110
 F   1111

It would do well to commit this table to memory.

  • yeah there's very little reason to use straight binary it's too many digits – Matt Joiner Aug 21 '10 at 4:18
1

You'll need to extract the bits one at a time and print them out to the screen. Here's a simple function

void printBits(int value) {
  int bits = sizeof(int)*8;
  int mask = 1 << (bits-1);
  while ( bits > 0 ) {
    putchar((mask & value) ? '1' : '0');
    bits--;
  }
}
0

Try this:

int number = 0xEC; 
for (int bit = 128; bit != 0; bit >>= 1) printf("%d", !!(number & bit));

If you want to avoid the heavy runtime of printf function, just use putchar:

putchar(!!(number & bit) + '0');

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