3

Here's the type of code that starts the violence:

public interface ISomething
{
   /// <exception cref="IOException" />
   void DoSomethingWithTheFilesystem();
}

Resharper 9.2 sees this and suggests (insists) that I add a using System.IO for IOException with a blue underline and a pop-over message that I can't dismiss. However, since this is an interface, I don't have an actual code reference to IOException, and I have Productivity Power Tools configured to remove unused usings when files are saved. So as soon as I save the document, PPT deletes the using. Which makes R# complain again the next time I open it (or do code analysis). Automatically adding usings when you add code is a very useful feature. So is automatically removing them when you delete it. Is there something I can do to make peace between these two factions without sacrificing one or the other?

  • 1
    I don't know of a solution, but I find this question amusing. – siride Feb 12 '16 at 14:30
  • 2
    question is funny......bloodshed :D – Viru Feb 12 '16 at 14:31
  • I think there is way to supress resharper error – Viru Feb 12 '16 at 14:31
  • 1
    What happens if you use /// <exception cref="System.IO.IOException" /> ? – Metro Smurf Feb 12 '16 at 14:32
  • 2
    It's probably actually better that you use the fully qualified name anyway. The documentation should be complete in place, without depend on using statements. – siride Feb 12 '16 at 14:34
2

Based on my comment as a suggestion which worked, I'll repost here as the answer.

Use the fully qualified namespace to maintain peace amongst the factions. As mentioned in the comments by @siride, this is "probably actually better that you use the fully qualified name anyway. The documentation should be complete in place, without depend on using statements."

/// <exception cref="IOException" />

Becomes:

/// <exception cref="System.IO.IOException" />

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