40

Given the following ActiveModel::Serializer class:

class SampleSerializer < ActiveModel::Serializer
  attributes :id, :name
end

How can this be tested with RSpec?

5 Answers 5

33

Assumptions

This answer assumes you have the rspec-rails, active_model_serializers and factory_girl_rails gems installed and configured.

This answer also assumes you have defined a factory for the Sample resource.

Serializer spec

For the current version(0.10.0.rc3) of active_model_serializers at the time of writing, ActiveModel::Serializer classes do not receive to_json and are , instead, wrapped in an adapter class. To obtain the serialization of a model wrapped in a serializer instance, an instance of an adapter must be created:

before(:each) do
  # Create an instance of the model
  @sample = FactoryGirl.build(:sample)

  # Create a serializer instance
  @serializer = SampleSerializer.new(@sample)

  # Create a serialization based on the configured adapter
  @serialization = ActiveModelSerializers::Adapter.create(@serializer)
end

The adapter instance receives the to_json method and returns the serialization of the model.

subject { JSON.parse(@serialization.to_json) }

Expectations can then be run on the JSON returned.

it 'should have a name that matches' do
  expect(subject['name']).to eql(@sample.name)
end

When parsing the JSON response, the adapter configuration must be taken into consideration:

  • The default config, :attributes, generates a JSON response without a root key:

    subject { JSON.parse(@serialization.to_json) }
    
  • The :json config generates a JSON response with a root key based on the model's name:

    subject { JSON.parse(@serialization.to_json)['sample'] }
    
  • The :json_api config generates a JSON that conforms to the jsonapi standard:

    subject { JSON.parse(@serialization.to_json)['data']['attributes'] }
    
3
  • this is most excellent. Wondering if you can unravel something for me. I have a polymorphic serializer, and for the last many hours, I cant get the associated records to render using the steps you outlined above. If I used just straight up SomeSerializer.new(resource).associations I seem to be able to see them, but its in no way a serialized data packet. Thanks
    – cgmckeever
    May 2, 2016 at 3:47
  • 5
    One note: ActiveModel::Serializer::Adapter.create is deprecated. Use ActiveModelSerializers::Adapter.create.
    – Terry Ray
    May 18, 2016 at 17:33
  • in what file should i write the tests
    – Arnold Roa
    Oct 7, 2020 at 6:44
31

When using active_model_serializers, there is a much easier way by simply calling serializable_hash on the serializer:

it 'should include a correct name' do
  sample = FactoryBot.create(:sample)
  serializer = SampleSerializer.new(sample)
  expect(serializer.serializable_hash[:name]).to eq 'Heisenberg'
end
2
20

@gnerkus’s answer helped to guide my own implementation, but I chose a different approach. Testing the returned values of ActiveModel::Serializer where no additional processing is being done by the Serializer seems to be testing both the presence of particular keys and whether ActiveModel::Serializer is working. To avoid testing ActiveModel::Serializer and instead test whether specific keys are present, here’s how I would test a given Serializer:

describe SampleSerializer do
  subject {  SampleSerializer.new(sample) }

  it "includes the expected attributes" do
    expect(subject.attributes.keys).
      to contain_exactly(
        :sample_key,
        :another_sample_key
      )
  end

  def sample
    @sample ||= build(:sample)
  end
end

Notice the use of contain_exactly: this ensures that no other keys than the ones you specify are present. Using include would result in tests not failing if unexpected attributes are included. This scales nicely when you update the attributes but fail to update your tests, as the test will throw an error and force you to keep everything up to date.

The exception to testing keys only would be when you want to test custom methods you’ve added to a given serializer, in which case I would highly recommend writing a test for the returned value/s impacted by that method.

Update

For testing relationships, you'll need to do a little more setup with the serializer. I avoid this setup for simple serializers, but this modified setup will help you test the presence of links, relationships, etc.

describe SampleSerializer do
  subject do
    ActiveModelSerializers::Adapter.create(sample_serializer)
  end

  it "includes the expected attributes" do
    expect(subject_json(subject)["data"]["attributes"].keys).
      to contain_exactly(
        "date"
      )
  end

  it "includes the related Resources" do
    expect(subject_json(subject)["data"]["relationships"].keys).
      to contain_exactly(
        "other-resources"
      )
  end

  def subject_json(subject)
    JSON.parse(subject.to_json)
  end

  def sample_resource
    @sample_resource ||= build(:sample_resource)
  end

  def sample_serializer
    @sample_serializer ||=
      SampleSerializer.new(sample_resource)
  end
end
3
8

Example: You can writing this modern style.

Category serializer:

class CategorySerializer < ActiveModel::Serializer
  attributes :id, :name
end

RSpec:

require 'rails_helper'

RSpec.describe CategorySerializer, type: :serializer do
  let(:category) { FactoryGirl.build(:category) }
  let(:serializer) { described_class.new(category) }
  let(:serialization) { ActiveModelSerializers::Adapter.create(serializer) }

  let(:subject) { JSON.parse(serialization.to_json) }

  it 'has an id that matches' do
    expect(subject['id']).to eql(category.id)
  end

  it 'has a name that matches' do
    expect(subject['name']).to eql(category.name)
  end  
end
2
  • Hi @Tanbir Hasan can you please at my question stackoverflow.com/questions/50781617/…
    – awsm sid
    Jun 10, 2018 at 11:17
  • In the version 0.10.10, the current_user is available in the serializer. To get it work in the tests you need to add let(:serializer) { described_class.new(category, scope: user, scope_name: :current_user) }
    – Piioo
    May 29, 2020 at 15:29
1

You can just use subject { described_class.new(user).serializable_hash } to create serialized object. My example below

UserSerializer:

# frozen_string_literal: true

class UserSerializer < ApplicationSerializer
  attributes :first_name, :last_name, :verification, :avatar_url, :state, :payin_ability
end

Rspec

# frozen_string_literal: true

RSpec.describe UserSerializer, type: :serializer do
  let(:user) { create(:user) }

  describe '.serializable_hash' do
    subject { described_class.new(user).serializable_hash }

    it { expect(subject).to include(:first_name, :last_name, :verification, :avatar_url, :state, :payin_ability) }

    it 'returns correct keys and values' do
      expect(subject).to include(
        first_name: be_a(String),
        last_name: be_a(String),
        verification: be_a(String),
        avatar_url: (be_a(String).or be_nil),
        state: be_kind_of(String),
        payin_ability: (be(true).or be(false)),
      )
    end
  end
end

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