2

I am experimenting with NSProgress, and finding a simple loop on a background thread causes memory to grow rapidly:

class Worker {
    var progress:NSProgress?

    func doWork() {
        let numIterations:Int64 = 100000
        let delay:UInt32 = 100

        let progressObj = NSProgress(totalUnitCount: numIterations)
       // progressObj.cancellable = true
        progress = progressObj


        let priority = DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT

        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(priority, 0)) {
            progressObj.becomeCurrentWithPendingUnitCount(numIterations)
            for i in 0...numIterations {
                progressObj.completedUnitCount = i
                usleep(delay)
            }

            progressObj.resignCurrent()
        }

    }

}

Profiling this with the Allocations instrument shows memory grow to about 20mb over 30 seconds (more if I increase the size of the loop). The allocations are all attributed to _NSProgressFraction.

Is there something obvious I'm overlooking, or is this a bug with NSProgress?

1
  • I see the same effect - a lot of tuples being created. The doco does suggest not being too granular, but due to KVO not memory usage.
    – Michael
    Feb 13 '16 at 23:25
4

After a little more experimentation, it looks like the act of setting progressObj.completedUnitCount causes NSProgress to make allocations into the current autorelease pool. I found I can keep the memory from growing by wrapping the loop body in an autorelease pool, like so:

for i in 0...numIterations {
    autoreleasepool {
        progressObj.completedUnitCount = i
        usleep(delay)
    }
}    
0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.