57

I'm crawling a lot of links with the request module in parallel with combination of the async module.
I'm noticing alot of ETIMEDOUT and ESOCKETTIMEDOUT errors although the links are reachable and respond fairly quickly using chrome.

I've limit the maxSockets to 2 and the timeout to 10000 in the request options. I'm using async.filterLimit() with a limit of 2 to even cut down the parallelism to 2 request each time. So I have 2 sockets, 2 request, and a timeout of 10 seconds to wait for headers response from the server yet I get these errors.

Here;s request configuration I use:

{
    ...
    pool: {
        maxSockets: 2
    },
    timeout: 10000
    ,
    time: true
    ...
}

Here's the snippet of code I use to fecth links:

var self = this;
async.filterLimit(resources, 2, function(resource, callback) {
    request({
        uri: resource.uri
    }, function (error, response, body) {
        if (!error && response.statusCode === 200) {
            ...
        } else {
            self.emit('error', resource, error);
        }
        callback(...);
    })
}, function(result) {
    callback(null, result);
});

I listened to the error event and I see whenever the error code is ETIMEDOUT the connect object is either true/false so sometimes it's a connection timeout and sometimes it's not (according to request docs)

UPDATE: I decided to boost up the maxSockets to Infinity so no connection will be hangup due to lack of available sockets:

pool: {
    maxSockets: Infinity
}

In-order to control the bandwidth I implemented a requestLoop method that handle the request with a maxAttemps and retryDelay parameters to control the requests:

async.filterLimit(resources, 10, function(resource, callback) {
    self.requestLoop({
        uri: resource.uri
    }, 100, 5000, function (error, response, body) {
            var fetched = false;
            if (!error) {
                ...
            } else {
                ....
            }
            callback(...);
        });
}, function(result) {
    callback(null, result);
});

Implementation of requestLoop:

requestLoop = function(options, attemptsLeft, retryDelay, callback, lastError) {
    var self = this;
    if (attemptsLeft <= 0) {
        callback((lastError != null ? lastError : new Error('...')));
    } else {
        request(options, function (error, response, body) {
            var recoverableErrors = ['ESOCKETTIMEDOUT', 'ETIMEDOUT', 'ECONNRESET', 'ECONNREFUSED'];
            var e;
            if ((error && _.contains(recoverableErrors, error.code)) || (response && (500 <= response.statusCode && response.statusCode < 600))) {
                e = error ? new Error('...');
                e.code = error ? error.code : response.statusCode;
                setTimeout((function () {
                    self.requestLoop(options, --attemptsLeft, retryDelay, callback, e);
                }), retryDelay);
            } else if (!error && (200 <= response.statusCode && response.statusCode < 300)) {
                callback(null, response, body);
            } else if (error) {
                e = new Error('...');
                e.code = error.code;
                callback(e);
            } else {
                e = new Error('...');
                e.code = response.statusCode;
                callback(e);
            }
        });
    }
};

So this to sum it up: - Boosted maxSockets to Infinity to try overcome timeout error of sockets connection - Implemnted requestLoop method to control failed request and maxAttemps as well as retryDelay of such requests - Also there's maxium number of concurrent request set by the number passed to async.filterLimit

I want to note that I've also played with the settings of everything here in-order to get errors free crawling but so far attempts failed as-well.

Still looking for help about solving this problem.

UPDATE2: I've decided to drop async.filterLimit and make my own limit mechanism. I just have 3 variables to help me achieve this:
pendingRequests - a request array which will hold all requests (will explain later) activeRequests - number of active requests maxConcurrentRequests - number of maximum allowed concurrent requests

into the pendingRequests array, i push a complex object containing a reference to the requestLoop function as well as arguments array containing the arguments to be passed to the loop function:

self.pendingRequests.push({
    "arguments": [{
        uri: resource.uri.toString()
    }, self.maxAttempts, function (error, response, body) {
        if (!error) {
            if (self.policyChecker.isMimeTypeAllowed((response.headers['content-type'] || '').split(';')[0]) &&
                self.policyChecker.isFileSizeAllowed(body)) {
                self.totalBytesFetched += body.length;
                resource.content = self.decodeBuffer(body, response.headers["content-type"] || '', resource);
                callback(null, resource);
            } else {
                self.fetchedUris.splice(self.fetchedUris.indexOf(resource.uri.toString()), 1);
                callback(new Error('Fetch failed because a mime-type is not allowed or file size is bigger than permited'));
            }
        } else {
            self.fetchedUris.splice(self.fetchedUris.indexOf(resource.uri.toString()), 1);
            callback(error);
        }
        self.activeRequests--;
        self.runRequest();
    }],
    "function": self.requestLoop
});
self.runRequest();

You'' notice the call to runRequest() at the end. This function job is to manage the requests and fire requests when it can while keeping the maximum activeRequests under the limit of maxConcurrentRequests:

var self = this;
process.nextTick(function() {
    var next;
    if (!self.pendingRequests.length || self.activeRequests >= self.maxConcurrentRequests) {
        return;
    }
    self.activeRequests++;
    next = self.pendingRequests.shift();
    next["function"].apply(self, next["arguments"]);
    self.runRequest();
});

This should solve any Timeouts errors, through my testings tho, I've still noticed some timeouts in specific websites I've tested this on. I can't be 100% sure about this, but I'm thinking it's due to the nature of the website backing http-server limiting a user requests to a maximum by doing an ip-checking and as a result returning some HTTP 400 messages to prevent a possible 'attack' on the server.

5
  • Did you ever get this figured out @Jorayen?
    – DvideBy0
    Commented May 20, 2016 at 16:56
  • @DvideBy0 Updated a solution
    – Jorayen
    Commented May 27, 2016 at 11:14
  • I found the issue with my code was slightly different. It appears that setting a timeout in my code wasn't respected as far as the underlying socket was concerned. I had to wait for the socket event (see below)
    – DvideBy0
    Commented May 27, 2016 at 13:30
  • 1
    .on('socket', function(socket) { socket.setTimeout(30000); socket.on('timeout', function() { request.abort(); logger.error('request timed out after 30 seconds'); }); })
    – DvideBy0
    Commented May 27, 2016 at 13:31
  • Possible duplicate of Node.js GET Request ETIMEDOUT & ESOCKETTIMEDOUT
    – OrangeDog
    Commented Jul 31, 2018 at 12:43

2 Answers 2

46

Edit: duplicate of https://stackoverflow.com/a/37946324/744276

By default, Node has 4 workers to resolve DNS queries. If your DNS query takes long-ish time, requests will block on the DNS phase, and the symptom is exactly ESOCKETTIMEDOUT or ETIMEDOUT.

Try increasing your uv thread pool size:

export UV_THREADPOOL_SIZE=128
node ...

or in index.js (or wherever your entry point is):

#!/usr/bin/env node
process.env.UV_THREADPOOL_SIZE = 128;

function main() {
   ...
}

Edit 1: I also wrote a blog post about it.

Edit 2: if queries are non-unique, you may want to use a cache, like nscd.

3
  • thanks for the helpful addition to this topic, I've yet to tested what you've suggested but that's good to know none the less. I will also report result as soon as I'll have a free time to do so :)
    – Jorayen
    Commented Jun 23, 2016 at 16:33
  • What I've read about UV_THREADPOOL_SIZE suggests that this is most important for blocking io (such as disk access) but will not matter for non-blocking io (such asnetwork access).
    – Eric Rini
    Commented Mar 23, 2017 at 17:09
  • 4
    That's correct, except DNS resolution is also blocking, due to how getaddrinfo(3) works. Commented Feb 8, 2019 at 6:03
3

I found if there are too many async requests, then ESOCKETTIMEDOUT exception happens in linux. The workaround I've found is doing this:

setting this options to request(): agent: false, pool: {maxSockets: 100} Notice that after that, the timeout can be lying so you might need to increase it.

1
  • 2
    First of all, this worked for me since I was downloading a few hundred small files which caused this bug. Secondly, what are the downsides of increasing the number of sockets? Will they be automatically closed at some point? Commented Aug 11, 2018 at 19:04

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