3

Is there an idiomatic way to implement an "once method", that is: a method whose return value gets evaluated on the first call only? Something like what the following simplified code does for the return value of x:

class X:
    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None

    def x(self):
        if not self._x:
            self._x = some_expensive_call()
        return self._x
7

As of Python 3.2, you can use the functools.lru_cache decorator (but it may be overkill for what you need):

import functools

@functools.lru_cache(maxsize=1)
def once():
    print("calculating expensive result")
    return "expensive result"

once()
once()

output:

calculating expensive result         # <- only prints on first call
'expensive result'                   # returned value on first call
'expensive result'                   # <- just return value on second call

Alternatively, you can write your own decorator:

def cache_result(func):
    def wrapper(*args, **kwds):
        if not wrapper.cached:
            wrapper.value = func(*args, **kwds)
            wrapper.cached = True

        return wrapper.value

    wrapper.cached = False

    return functools.update_wrapper(wrapper, func)

And use it on any function you want to run only once and cache the result

@cache_result
def do_once():
    print('doing it once')
    return 'expensive result'
  • Besides functions, does functools.lru_cache work for methods, too? – Elena Feb 14 '16 at 10:56
7

One way is to give the function itself an attribute which will only be True on the first call.

>>> def once():
...     if once.first_call:
...         print('doing some heavy computation over here...')
...         once.result = 1 + 1
...         once.first_call = False
...     return once.result
... 
>>> once.first_call = True
>>> once()
doing some heavy computation over here...
2
>>> once()
2

Another option is to (ab)use a mutable default parameter. The advantage is that you don't have to set an attribute on the function after defining it:

>>> def once(state={'first_call':True}):
...     if state['first_call']:
...         print('doing some heavy computation over here...')
...         state['result'] = 1 + 1
...         state['first_call'] = False
...     return state['result']
... 
>>> once()
doing some heavy computation over here...
2
>>> once()
2

edit:

For completeness, if you have instance attributes that should only be computed once, use a property:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None

    @property
    def x(self):
        if self._x is None:
            self._x = self._compute_x()
        return self._x

    def _compute_x(self):
        print('doing some heavy computation over here...')
        return 1 + 1

Demo:

>>> f = Foo()
>>> f.x
doing some heavy computation over here...
2
>>> f.x
2
  • Besides functions, does this solution work for methods, too? – Elena Feb 14 '16 at 1:38
  • @Elena sure, but inside a class you could and probably should use a property decorator to achieve this result. – timgeb Feb 14 '16 at 1:40
1

Since you tagged this as Python 3.X, you can also use a function annotation as a state flag:

>>> def f()->{"state":False}:
...    if f.__annotations__['return']['state']==False:
...       f.__annotations__['return']['state']=True
... 
>>> f.__annotations__
{'return': {'state': False}}
>>> f()
>>> f.__annotations__
{'return': {'state': True}}

For a class, timgeb method works great.

1

The old-school method is to just have a global that holds the result.

_foo_result = None

def foo():
    global _foo_result
    if _foo_result is None:
        _foo_result = _get_me_some_foo()
    return _foo_result

If None is a valid result, define an empty class and use that instead

class _FooNone: pass

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