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Possible Duplicates:
Abstract classes vs Interfaces
Interface vs Base class

Hi,

In C# when should we use interfaces and when should we use abstract classes? Please explain with example

marked as duplicate by ChrisF, Jon Skeet, Henk Holterman, nos, RCIX Aug 21 '10 at 20:49

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    @BlaXpirit: Would a question about whether to declare variables at the start of a method or at the place of first use prove that Java is a bad clone of C++? Your comment is pointlessly provocative, with no evidence of either your main point or your snipe at C# being "bad". – Jon Skeet Aug 21 '10 at 20:49
  • @Bla Hi, I got answer from your recommended questions. Technically i can understand the difference, and when I use an abstract class I am re-using the base class code in my derived classes. But why I need to write an interface and implement it? Anyway I am going to define the methods only in the class that implements hte interface. So if two classes implement the interface that I write and defines the method in the interface, I will be able to use the classes and methods even If I don't write an interface correct? So what advantage will I achieve when I use interfaces? – SARAVAN Aug 21 '10 at 21:10
  • My head started to hurt while I was reading the previous comment. So I'll give you a helpful link that contains lots of other links that make your head hurt: duckduckgo.com/?q=interface+vs+abstract+class – Oleh Prypin Aug 22 '10 at 22:42
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Abstract class, if you want to implement basic functionality and some properties/methods that must be overwritten by the implementer:

public abstract class Entity
{
     public int Id { get; set;}

     public bool IsNew { get { return Id == 0; } }

     public abstract DoSomething(int id); // must be implemented by concrete class
}

Interface, if you want to define, which properties/methods a class must contain, without implementing any functionality:

public interface IRepository
{
    object Get(int id);
    IEnumerable<object> GetAll();
}
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use interfaces when you don't when your describing a contract and abstract classes when your implmenting functionality that will be shared among deriving classes.

To examples of usage could be template pattern and Strategy pattern

  • Technically i can understand the difference, and when I use an abstract class I am reusing the base class code in my derived classes. But why I need to write an interface and implement it. Anyway I am going to define the methods only in the class that implements it. So if two classes implement the interface that I write and defines the method in the interfaces, I will be able to use the classes and methods even If I dont write an interface correct? So what advantage will I achieve when I use interfaces? – SARAVAN Aug 21 '10 at 21:08

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